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Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, The Guildhall, Market Square, Cambridge, CB2 3QJ. View directions

Contact: Democratic Services  Committee Manager

Link: Video recording of the meeting

Items
No. Item

18/40/CNL

Minutes pdf icon PDF 620 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of 24 May 2018 as amended and detailed in the Information Pack were confirmed as a correct record and signed by the Mayor.

 

18/41/CNL

Mayor's announcements

Minutes:

APOLOGIES

 

Apologies were received from Councillor Ashton, Dryden, Hipkin and Page-Croft.

 

The Mayor stated that he’d had a busy and enjoyable start to the Mayoral year and highlight several events which he had particularly enjoyed which included Arbury Carnival, Chesterton Festival, The Dragon Boat Festival, the Abbey People Big Lunch, the Big Weekend and the Annual Memorial Ride to the American Cemetery.

 

The Mayor also reminded members about the Night Market the following evening which would show the films Paddington and Grease.

 

Mayor’s Day Out

 

Members were reminded about the Mayor’s day out which was due to take place on Tuesday 14 August.

 

Harvest Festival Civic Service

 

Members were advised about the harvest festival which would take place on Sunday 7 October at 9.30am at Great St. Mary’s Church. 

 

Presentation of resolution of thanks to Councillor George Pippas

 

On behalf of the City Council, the Mayor presented Councillor Pippas with a framed copy of the Resolution of Thanks for his service as Mayor during the 2017/18 municipal year, passed at the annual meeting of the Council on the 24 May 2018.

 

 

18/42/CNL

Declaration of Interests

Minutes:

Name

Item

Interest

Benstead

18/45/CNLa

Trustee of Cambridge Live

O’Connell

18/45/CNLa

Was a trustee of Cambridge Live

Moore

18/46/CNLa

Worked for a small local sustainable food company

Johnson

18/49/CNLd

Employer was Daniel Zeichner

Price

18/49/CNLb

Daughter is a tenant of City Homes

Gillespie

18/46/CNLa

Undertaken paid work for Cambridge Tea and Coffee

 

18/43/CNL

Petition

A petition has been received containing over 500 valid signatures

stating the following:

 

We, the undersigned, call on Cambridge City Council to withdraw and reconsider the charges for the use of Shop Mobility which it introduced on 1st April.

 

The petition organiser will be given 5 minutes to present the petition at the meeting and the petition will then be discussed by Councillors for a maximum of 15 minutes. The Council will then decide how to respond to the petition.

Minutes:

A petition had been received containing over 500 valid signatures stating the following:

 

We, the undersigned, call on Cambridge City Council to withdraw and reconsider the charges for the use of Shop Mobility which it introduced on 1st April.

 

Ms Simms presented and spoke in support of the petition.

 

The following points were made:

i.  946 signatures had been collected from users and former users of Shopmobility.

ii.  The petition had restored faith in the community

iii.  Changes made to the Shopmobility service had reduced usage by two thirds.

iv.  People who needed the most help fell away from being able to use the service.

v.  The Executive Councillor’s decision had increased the number of vulnerable people being lonely.

vi.  The Council was not generating the income it had hoped for and the Shopmobility service was in danger of dying on its feet.

vii.  Asked what further evidence was required for the Executive Councillor to change his decision.

 

Councillors debated the issues raised for the allocated 15 minutes.

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport made the following comments:

i.  The petition was a Liberal Democrat sponsored petition, it had been posted on their website and signatures had been collected at Arbury Carnival. There were a number of signatories who did not live in Cambridge.

ii.  The petition did not explain that Shopmobility charges would be less for people who were VAT exempt and of the 67 people who had used the service 2 were not VAT exempt.

iii.  Acknowledged that where there was previously a free service and then charges were introduced, there would be people who would be unhappy by this decision.

iv.  The impact of the service would be reviewed when it was reasonable and appropriate to do so.

v.  No decision would be made at the council meeting that evening.

18/44/CNL

Public questions time

Minutes:

Members of the public asked a number of questions as set out below:

 

1.  Mr Carpen asked the following:

 

What thoughts had the Mayor of Cambridge and councillors given to the idea of a Mayor's Permanent Fund to act as a central 'collecting pot' for donations from wealthy and affluent donors to help fund large civic projects that cannot be paid for through existing council funds or developer contributions? (Article at https://adragonsbestfriend.wordpress.com/2018/07/09/a-permanent-cambridge-mayoral-fund/)

 

The Leader provided the following response:

  i.  In each Mayoral year, the Mayor nominated the charities that they would like to raise money for. In this mayoral year Councillor Gawthrope had nominated the Alzheimer’s Society and the Red Hen project.

  ii.  It was not appropriate for the council to become the sponsor of major charities.

  iii.  The Council contributed £900,000 to voluntary organisations.

  iv.  He commented that the council could look at how financial contributions to the Mayor’s charities were made simpler.

 

Mr Carpen made the following supplementary points:

  i.  The fund he was trying to describe was for larger capital projects that the council should be funding in any event.

  ii.  There were a lot of homes being built but not the civic infrastructure to support it.

  iii.  The number of community venues had got smaller.

 

The Leader made the following supplementary points:

  i.  He did not think that the council should seek individual contributions to infrastructure projects.

  ii.  He suggested that the council would continue to focus on the charities nominated by the Mayor and community grants awarded by the council.

 

Mr Carpen submitted three additional public questions and it was agreed that a written response could be provided to Mr Carpen and published on the Council meeting webpage. A link to the questions and answers can be found here: https://democracy.cambridge.gov.uk/ieListDocuments.aspx?CId=116&MId=3403&Ver=4

 

2.  Ms Hyde asked the following:

  i.  Soroptimist International was working to promote toilet twinning in the UK. This involved twinning a toilet with another in the developing world through a UK based organisation.  The idea was to raise funds to provide fresh water and sanitation via the £60 fee to twin.  Women and girls were particularly disadvantaged. The organisation had been going for 70 years.

  ii.  More than 40 people / organisations had been encouraged to twin their toilets.

  iii.  If Cambridge agreed to twin a block of 4 toilets the resulting publicity may encourage more people and organisations to support the venture.

 

The Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces responded as follows:

  i.  Toilet twinning was an excellent initiative.

  ii.  She would commit to twinning her own toilet.

  iii.  If a decision was made to support the initiative later on in the agenda then she would work with officers to progress the decision.

 

Ms Ebanks raised the following question:

  i.  Cambridge Housing Society was proposing to demolish all homes at Montreal Square and the replacement proposal would not consist of 100% affordable housing.

  ii.  The existing development had been built over 90 years ago and was very successful and it had a nice area of green space.

  iii.  There was an online petition with 1300 signatures and 700 signatures had been collected via a paper petition.

  iv.  She questioned if it was right to decant residents from their homes.

  v.  She commented that it was not a necessity to build in the City.

 

The Executive Councillor for Housing made the following comments:

  i.  Cambridge Housing Society (CHS) was in a consultation with residents regarding proposals for the redevelopment of the site. It would be wrong of him or the council to interfere with that process. Once the consultation process ended it would be for the CHS Board to make a decision.

  ii.  There were 3 Ward Councillors who would be able to assist residents.

 

Mr Fox asked the following question:

  i.  It had recently emerged that new allotment sites in the southern fringe developments were not allowed sheds on the allotment land to store their equipment. This restriction would hinder people being able to use their allotments. He asked why the Council had done this and whether this decision could be reconsidered.

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport gave the following response:

  i.  He referred back to the decision made in consultation with landowners; the land was situated within Clay Farm Country Park and was designated as green belt land.

  ii.  The landowner insisted the transfer of land included a restriction that there were no sheds on the allotments. There was an agreement in place regarding a communal building. 

  iii.  He understood that this was not enough from an allotment holder perspective.

  iv.  He questioned if a storage area could be added to the communal building.

  v.  Commented that there was a process to vary planning decisions.

  vi.  The allotments were starter plots rather than established plots.

 

Mr Fox made the following supplementary points:

  i.  There needed to be storage locations around the site for allotment holders to store their equipment.

  ii.  Asked when the new allotments would be available.

  iii.  Asked for a firm commitment that the allotments would be available in the autumn.

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport made the following supplementary point:

  i.  There was a condition that the allotments would be made available no later than 1000th dwelling occupation.

  ii.  With hindsight he accepted Mr Fox’s knowledge about allotments.

  iii.  The council had to comply with conditions but he would look to see if this could be improved. 

 

18/45/CNL

To consider the recommendations of the Executive for adoption

18/45/CNLa

Cambridge Live: Business Plan Review (Executive Councillor for Communities) pdf icon PDF 114 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved by (22 vote to 2) to:

 

Revise the Council’s 2018/19 budget to make an allocation of £500k from reserves to be utilised for the purpose specified in 2.1 of the officer’s report during 2018/9 and 2019/20 with full delegation for management of the funds assigned to the Chief Executive.

 

18/45/CNLb

2017/18 Revenue and Capital Outturn, Carry Forwards and Significant Variances - Housing Revenue Account (Executive Councillor for Housing) pdf icon PDF 90 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved by (24 votes to 0) to:

 

Approve carry forward requests of £3,798,000 in HRA and General Fund Housing capital resources from 2017/18 to 2018/19 to fund rephased net capital spending, as detailed in Appendix D of the officer’s report and the associated notes to the appendix.

 

 

 

18/45/CNLc

Annual Treasury Management (Outturn) Report 2017/18 (Executive Councillor for Finance & Resources) pdf icon PDF 105 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved by (24 votes to 0) to:

 

Approve the Annual Treasury Management (Outturn) report which included the Council’s actual Prudential and Treasury Indicators for 2017/18.

 

 

18/45/CNLd

2017/18 Revenue and Capital Outturn, Carry Forwards and Significant Variances (All Portfolios) (Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources) pdf icon PDF 92 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor McGerty proposed and Councillor Dalzell seconded the following amendment to recommendation a (additional text underlined deleted text struckthrough).

 

a) Carry forward requests totalling £1,330k£1,350k General Fund

revenue funding from 2017/18 to 2018/19, as detailed in Appendix C with the addition of £20,000 in the Streets and Open Spaces “Street Cleaning Direct” budget line (underspent by £124,090 last year), to conduct an urgent supplementary summer deep clean of all commercial streets in the historic centre, Grafton area and neighbourhood shopping centres, subject to discussion with Cambridge BID about an appropriate contribution from their funds, utilising third party contractors if necessary to make optimum use of the necessary early morning time window

 

On a show of hands the amendment was lost by 13 votes to 23.

 

Councillor Bick proposed and Councillor Nethsingha seconded the additional paragraph d to the recommendations (additional text underlined)

 

(d) Allocation of an additional £50,000 from General Fund reserves for the appointment of an extra Project Officer in the Project Delivery Team for one year, to reduce the backlog in Environmental Improvement Schemes and enable new schemes to be undertaken in 2018/19 as provided for in the capital budget and a longer term staffing review to be undertaken in the meantime to ensure delivery capacity is adequate.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was lost by 13 votes to 23.

 

Resolved by (24 votes to 0) to:

 

i) Carry forward requests totalling £1,330k General Fund revenue funding from 2017/18 to 2018/19, as detailed in Appendix C of the officer’s report.

 

ii) Carry forward requests of £14,111k capital resources from 2017/18 to 2018/19 to fund rephased net capital spending, as detailed in Appendix D of the officer’s report - Overview (including £10,313k General Fund and £3,798 relating to the Housing Capital Investment Plan).

 

iii) (Request from Communities Portfolio:) allocation of an additional £100,000 from General Fund reserves to be made available for the Community Grants budget in 2019/20 to help fund projects delivered by the voluntary and community sector which will reduce poverty.

 

 

18/46/CNL

To consider a report from the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre

18/46/CNLa

Good Food for Cambridge pdf icon PDF 132 KB

At the Council meeting on the 19 April 2018 the motion ‘Good Food for Cambridge’ was referred to the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre.  Under Council Procedure Rules, the decision of the Executive Councillor is reported back to Council

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive Councillor considered the Good Food for Cambridge motion at the Environment and Community Scrutiny Committee on 28 June 2018.

 

The following decisions of the Executive Councillor were reported to Council:

  i.  Recognised the role of Cambridge Sustainable Food in acting as an umbrella organisation in Cambridge that brought together a range of organisations with an interest in promoting sustainable food within the National Sustainable Food Cities Network.

  ii.  Asked officers to work with Cambridge Sustainable Food in submitting a bid to the national Sustainable Food Cities Network for their Silver Award, contributing to the action plan where appropriate.

  iii.  Adopted the Sustainable Food Policy Statement set out at Appendix A of the Officer’s report.

 

 

18/47/CNL

To consider the recommendations of Committees for adoption

18/47/CNLa

Civic Affairs: Council submission to Local Government Boundary Commission for England on new warding arrangement for Cambridge City Council pdf icon PDF 368 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

i.  Approve the city council submission to the Local Government Boundary Commission for England as set out in the appendix to the adoption minute.

 

18/48/CNL

To deal with oral questions

Minutes:

1) Councillor McQueen to the Executive Councillor for Housing

 

Can the Executive Councillor please update council on the progress to date and further initiatives to promote Cambridge Street Aid??

 

The Executive Councillor for Housing responded since Street Aid was launched 18 months ago, over £32,000 had been raised for grants to help people get off the streets. This included buying shoes or suits for people to go to job interviews or to pay for training qualifications. Outside Mandela House a contactless payment point had been installed that week so that members of the public could donate £3 to the project. This had media coverage from ITV and Cambs TV. A booklet had also been produced which told people what Street Aid was about. 

 

2) Councillor Payne to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport

 

Does the Executive Councillor believe that the City Council is doing everything possible to integrate the new housing developments in Cambridge with the existing community?

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport responded that money was used on the back of applications in growth areas to ensure that we had community workers and team members paid for by developers.

 

3) Councillor Dalzell to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport

 

Can the Executive Councillor for Planning and Transport confirm what steps are being taken to support the proposed transformation of Mitcham’s Corner whilst we await the approval of the Local Plan and associated Supplementary Planning Framework?

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport responded that the Local Plan and Supplementary Planning Documents were hoped to be approved in early autumn. The documents would have more weight once they were formally approved. He had tried to encourage stakeholders to work to the documents as these had been worked up in consultation with residents.

 

4) Councillor O'Reilly to the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces

 

Can the Executive Councillor update the council on the progress and benefits of the pictorial meadows in the city?

 

The Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces responded that there were 13 flowering meadows in the City and the meadows included native and non-native species. Thought had gone into trying to future proof the meadows taking into account climate change whilst ensuring that there were still a selection of flowers that would attract bees. The Open Spaces Team had been experimenting with perennial planting which would need less maintenance. She thanked Officers for all their hard work.

 

5) Councillor Martinelli to the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre

 

Within my ward the Grafton Centre have installed a sign on one of their walls advising motorists to turn off their engine in an area where engine idling had been noted to be an issue. Would the council be able to commit to adopting a similarly proactive approach, with the use of No Idling signs for driver education, at one of the many public sites where this has been a problem?

 

The Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre responded that the adopted Air Quality Action Plan, which was unanimously supported at Committee supported measures to reduce impacts from idling and this was one of a number of areas where policy could be developed following the current consultation period. The installation of signs could be a positive action to consider. Steps had already been taken to reduce idling by writing to all schools to remind parents of the impact of vehicle emissions outside schools.

 

6) Councillor Cantrill to the Executive Councillor for Housing

 

Does the Executive Councillor believe that the City Council is doing everything possible to house people in Cambridge?

 

The Executive Councillor for Housing responded that in December 2017 there were 1239 housing completions of those were 474 affordable houses. The Council was on track to deliver 700 new homes by 2021 and was set to receive £70 million from Central Government for affordable housing. The Council was tackling empty homes better than Oxford.

 

7) Councillor McGerty to the Executive Councillor for Communities

 

Is the Executive Councillor for Communities satisfied with the summer outdoor events program?

 

The Executive Councillor for Communities responded that the City Events programme was delivered by Cambridge Live on the council’s behalf. The 2018 programme started with the return of Jazz and Brass in the Parks, and there had been two performances in parks to date, at Cherry Hinton Hall on 10 June with the Royston Town Band, and at Jesus Green 1 July with the Cambridge Youth Jazz band and the Cambridgeshire Youth Jazz Orchestra, which was in association with Cambridge Jazz Festival. There are four more concerts to come in this series, on the 12th and 19th August and the 2nd and 9th September.

 

Midsummer Fair and market had taken place from 20 - 25 June on Midsummer Common. This was a historic Charter fair which had been taking place for over 800 years and attracted diverse audience from across the city and beyond.

 

The most recent event to take place was the Big Weekend, which was well attended and celebrated the rich diversity of the city, from the Friday night pop bands and fireworks to the Saturday family day with an excellent range of activities, the Saturday evening concert, and the Sunday Mela.

 

8) Councillor Smart to the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces

 

Can the Executive Councillor update us on the Green Flag Award applications made earlier in the year?

 

The Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces responded that Christ Pieces had been awarded the Green Flag award; this was the equivalent of the blue flag award which was awarded to beaches.  Certain requirements for example litter, vandalism and community involvement had to be met to be eligible for the award. She thanked Anthony French and Christ Pieces Friends Association for the work undertaken to achieve the award.

 

The following oral questions were tabled but owing to the expiry of the period of time permitted, were not covered during the meeting. The Mayor asked Executive Councillors if a written response could be provided to those questions that had not been covered.

 

9) Councillor Bick to the Executive Councillor for Communities

 

What are “priority groups” in relation to the city’s community centres and how important are they to the purpose of the community centres? 

 

10) Councillor Baigent to the Leader

 

There is a demonstration taking place by the Football Lad’s Alliance in support of Tommy Robinson on Saturday 21st July at 1500 on Parker’s Piece that will be followed by a march.  There is also a counter demonstration taking place at 1400 on Donkey Common organised by a committee of Cambridge people that has amongst its members Unite Against Racism, Fire Brigades Union and Unite the Union.  Could the leader please provide an update on how Cambridge may be affected by these events?

 

11) Councillor McPherson to the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces

 

Can the Executive Councillor update us on the tree trail in Cherry Hinton Hall grounds?

 

12) Councillor Barnett to the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre

 

Can the Executive Councillor update us on visitor numbers to Cambridge and the impacts on the city?

 

13) Councillor Sargeant to the Leader

 

Can the Leader update the Council on the latest position in relation to the pause on Greater Cambridge Partnership transport projects imposed by the Combined Authority Mayor, and his efforts along with the GCP and the leader of South Cambridgeshire District Council to ensure the GCP can do its job and that both organisations work together to deliver vital transport improvements for Cambridge?

 

14) Councillor Thittala to the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre

 

What has been the progress of the night markets and what value do they give to residents?

 

15) Councillor Holt to the Leader

 

What action is the Council planning to ameliorate the impact that the temporary closure of the Park Street Car Park for redevelopment – may have on independent businesses in the surrounding part of the city centre? 

 

 

16) Councillor Massey to the Executive Councillor for Communities

 

Can the Executive Councillor for Communities inform Council of what activities will be on offer for young people by Chypps during the summer holidays?

 

17) Councillor Nethsingha to the Leader

 

Does the Leader have confidence that the Mayor and Combined Authority are working sufficiently collaboratively with all the bodies which have transport and planning responsibilities within the Combined Authority area, to give the Minister for Local Government the reassurance requested in his letter ahead of the gateway assessment for the GCP in 2019?

 

18/49/CNL

To consider the following notices of motion, notice of which has been given by:

18/49/CNLa

Councillor Todd-Jones - Toilet Twinning

Toilet Twinning is an initiative similar to twinning towns and cities, inviting individuals and organisations to ‘twin’ toilets with latrines in poor communities. The raising of funds in this way enables people in poorer countries to have clean water and a proper toilet. Hygiene awareness is a key focus of the Toilet Twinning programme.

 

Toilet Twinning works through community mobilisation, creating locally owned, locally delivered water and sanitation programmes. In conflict areas, where little infrastructure exists, Toilet Twinning funds programmes that build toilets and provide clean water.

 

The lack of adequate sanitation has a particular impact on women and, in this Year of the Woman, organisations backing Toilet Twinning include Soroptimist International, dedicated to making a difference to the lives of women and girls locally, nationally, and internationally through education, empowerment, and leadership projects.

 

This Council notes:

 

Chester became the first UK Toilet Twinned City in 2015. Soroptimist International of Cambridge have already twinned 42 toilets, working with communities and organisations, and request that Cambridge City Council formally applies to Toilet Twinning UK so that Cambridge becomes a Toilet Twinned City;

 

In conjunction with improvements to our public toilets, as part of the Toilet Twinned City initiative the City Council nominates public toilets so that £60 per nominated toilet, funded by Soroptimist International of Cambridge, is donated to a poorer country, as advised by Toilet Twinning UK, to help provide clean water and toilet facilities;

 

Requests the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces to work with officers and Soroptimist International of Cambridge to identify toilets within the remit of the City Council as part of the application to become a Toilet Twinned City, and to invite the Mayor of Cambridge and Members of Parliament representing Cambridge to be part of this initiative.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Todd-Jones proposed and Councillor Bird seconded the following motion:

 

Toilet Twinning is an initiative similar to twinning towns and cities, inviting individuals and organisations to ‘twin’ toilets with latrines in poor communities. The raising of funds in this way enables people in poorer countries to have clean water and a proper toilet. Hygiene awareness is a key focus of the Toilet Twinning programme.

 

Toilet Twinning works through community mobilisation, creating locally owned, locally delivered water and sanitation programmes. In conflict areas, where little infrastructure exists, Toilet Twinning funds programmes that build toilets and provide clean water.

 

The lack of adequate sanitation has a particular impact on women and, in this Year of the Woman, organisations backing Toilet Twinning include Soroptimist International, dedicated to making a difference to the lives of women and girls locally, nationally, and internationally through education, empowerment, and leadership projects.

 

This Council notes:

 

Chester became the first UK Toilet Twinned City in 2015. Soroptimist International of Cambridge have already twinned 42 toilets, working with communities and organisations, and request that Cambridge City Council formally applies to Toilet Twinning UK so that Cambridge becomes a Toilet Twinned City;

 

In conjunction with improvements to our public toilets, as part of the Toilet Twinned City initiative the City Council nominates public toilets so that £60 per nominated toilet, funded by Soroptimist International of Cambridge, is donated to a poorer country, as advised by Toilet Twinning UK, to help provide clean water and toilet facilities;

 

Requests the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces to work with officers and Soroptimist International of Cambridge to identify toilets within the remit of the City Council as part of the application to become a Toilet Twinned City, and to invite the Mayor of Cambridge and Members of Parliament representing Cambridge to be part of this initiative.

 

Resolved (unanimously) to support the motion.

 

 

18/49/CNLb

Councillor Cantrill - Housing solutions to help hardworking people live in Cambridge

The Cambridge housing market is broken.  The City Council, as a key stakeholder, needs to help residents across the city to be able to afford to live in Cambridge

 

The programme to build 500 new council houses will help some of the 2300 households on the housing register – which we all welcome

 

However, the city council appears to have done little to help those hardworking city makers, people like teachers and nurses, who are often the thread that holds the city together and ensures the city works and importantly are not eligible for council housing or support

 

To help these hardworking residents, the city council needs to come forward with specific proposals that will help them to continue to live in Cambridge

 

Pocket Living, a London based developer provides an illustration of how the council could help such residents.  Pocket Living provides:

-  1 and 2 bedroom flats for first time buyers who work locally

- The properties are sold outright at a discount of 20% to local market prices

- Buyers commit to sell the property at a 20% discount when they move on -Properties are well designed compact spaces, with elements of shared communal space

- Flats are developed on a modular basis – built off site and assembled on site – reducing construction time and costs

 

The Council asks the Executive Councillor for Housing to:

- Work with officers to explore possible sites in Cambridge (including the recently acquired Cromwell Road site) where such a scheme could be implemented

- Develop a detailed criteria for how the scheme could be delivered and identify third party providers who can assist in its delivery

- To bring the proposals to the appropriate scrutiny committee for review and approval

 

Minutes:

Councillor Cantrill proposed and Councillor Payne seconded the following motion:

 

The Cambridge housing market is broken.  The City Council, as a key stakeholder, needs to help residents across the city to be able to afford to live in Cambridge

 

The programme to build 500 new council houses will help some of the 2300 households on the housing register – which we all welcome

 

However, the city council appears to have done little to help those hardworking city makers, people like teachers and nurses, who are often the thread that holds the city together and ensures the city works and importantly are not eligible for council housing or support

 

To help these hardworking residents, the city council needs to come forward with specific proposals that will help them to continue to live in Cambridge

 

Pocket Living, a London based developer provides an illustration of how the council could help such residents.  Pocket Living provides:

-  1 and 2 bedroom flats for first time buyers who work locally

- The properties are sold outright at a discount of 20% to local market prices

- Buyers commit to sell the property at a 20% discount when they move on -Properties are well designed compact spaces, with elements of shared communal space

- Flats are developed on a modular basis – built off site and assembled on site – reducing construction time and costs

 

The Council asks the Executive Councillor for Housing to:

- Work with officers to explore possible sites in Cambridge (including the recently acquired Cromwell Road site) where such a scheme could be implemented

- Develop a detailed criteria for how the scheme could be delivered and identify third party providers who can assist in its delivery

- To bring the proposals to the appropriate scrutiny committee for review and approval

 

Councillor Price proposed and Councillor Thornburrow seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struck through and additional text underlined):

 

The Cambridge housing market is broken.  The City Council, as a key stakeholder, needs to help residents across the city to be able to afford to live in Cambridge

 

The programme to build 500 new council houses will help some of the 2300 households on the housing register – which we all welcome

 

However, the city council appears to have done little to help those hardworking city makers, people like teachers and nurses, who are often the thread that holds the city together and ensures the city works and importantly are not eligible for council housing or support

 

To help these hardworking residents, the city council needs to come forward with specific proposals that will help them to continue to live in Cambridge

 

Pocket Living, a London based developer provides an illustration of how the council could help such residents.  Pocket Living provides:

-  1 and 2 bedroom flats for first time buyers who work locally

- The properties are sold outright at a discount of 20% to local market prices

- Buyers commit to sell the property at a 20% discount when they move on -Properties are well designed compact spaces, with elements of shared communal space

- Flats are developed on a modular basis – built off site and assembled on site – reducing construction time and costs

 

The Council asks the Executive Councillor for Housing to:

- Work with officers to explore possible sites in Cambridge (including the recently acquired Cromwell Road site) where such a scheme could be implemented

- Develop a detailed criteria for how the scheme could be delivered and identify third party providers who can assist in its delivery

- To bring the proposals to the appropriate scrutiny committee for review and approval

 

The Cambridge housing market, as outlined in the City Council's Interim Housing Strategy Statement 2017, is set in a challenging national and local context and one moreover frequently subject to ongoing policy and legislative changes, exemplified by the recent appointment of Kit Malthouse, MP, as the 8th Housing Minister since 2010 and the second in the last 8 months alone.


This Council recognises that "good quality, affordable housing, whatever the tenure, is the key to delivering the opportunity for all our city's residents to thrive and live in mixed communities of their own choice" (Interim Housing Strategy Statement 2017) and it welcomes the unanimous endorsement of the Strategy and its key strategic priorities by all members of Housing Scrutiny Committee in March 2017.


The Council notes:

·  that the Strategy prioritises the provision of new council homes for those on low incomes, aiming for rents to be at or below LHA levels

·  that for many in work council housing remains the best option for a decent, secure and affordable home, including many working in the education and health sectors

·  that the Strategy recognises the need for intermediate tenure housing and supports the delivery of different tenure models across the Greater Cambridge area whilst acknowledging that this cannot be at the expense of providing a supply of social housing.

·  That the Council set up a wholly owned council company - Cambridge City Housing Company - to purchase market sale properties to be let on the intermediate market at submarket rents and that there are plans to expand its property portfolio on the redeveloped Mill Road Depot site and other General Fund sites.

 

The Council further notes that the last report to the Housing Scrutiny Committee on Intermediate Market Housing was in 2014, It further notes that shared ownership properties on its own sites, such as Clay Farm and Homerton, have proven difficult to sell and that since 2014 the intermediate tenure housing market has become increasingly complex, comprising shared ownership, shared equity, Help To Buy equity loans and intermediate rents. Alongside these further Low Cost Home Ownership (LCHO) market sale options have also emerged such as starter homes and 'pocket' homes such as those delivered by Pocket Living, where high density, high quality design compact flats are delivered on small, mainly brownfield, sites with a 20% discount to the market value in perpetuity for first time buyers meeting locally agreed criteria as a condition of planning consent. It also notes that Homes England and the Mayor of London have recognised the potential of options such as 'pocket homes' to help address affordability issues in high priced areas and have provided some funding for site assembly to developers like Pocket Living.

 

It therefore requests the Strategic Director to bring a detailed report on Intermediate Market Housing to the Housing Scrutiny Committee to clarify the different options and the ongoing joint work with other councils and partners such as the Great Cambridge Partnership and Combined Authority to increase provision for the 'squeezed middle' who live or work in Cambridge.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 24 votes to 0.

 

Resolved (unanimously) that:

 

The Cambridge housing market, as outlined in the City Council's Interim Housing Strategy Statement 2017, is set in a challenging national and local context and one moreover frequently subject to ongoing policy and legislative changes, exemplified by the recent appointment of Kit Malthouse, MP, as the 8th Housing Minister since 2010 and the second in the last 8 months alone.


This Council recognises that "good quality, affordable housing, whatever the tenure, is the key to delivering the opportunity for all our city's residents to thrive and live in mixed communities of their own choice" (Interim Housing Strategy Statement 2017) and it welcomes the unanimous endorsement of the Strategy and its key strategic priorities by all members of Housing Scrutiny Committee in March 2017.


The Council notes:

·  that the Strategy prioritises the provision of new council homes for those on low incomes, aiming for rents to be at or below LHA levels

·  that for many in work council housing remains the best option for a decent, secure and affordable home, including many working in the education and health sectors

·  that the Strategy recognises the need for intermediate tenure housing and supports the delivery of different tenure models across the Greater Cambridge area whilst acknowledging that this cannot be at the expense of providing a supply of social housing.

·  That the Council set up a wholly owned council company - Cambridge City Housing Company - to purchase market sale properties to be let on the intermediate market at submarket rents and that there are plans to expand its property portfolio on the redeveloped Mill Road Depot site and other General Fund sites.

 

The Council further notes that the last report to the Housing Scrutiny Committee on Intermediate Market Housing was in 2014, It further notes that shared ownership properties on its own sites, such as Clay Farm and Homerton, have proven difficult to sell and that since 2014 the intermediate tenure housing market has become increasingly complex, comprising shared ownership, shared equity, Help To Buy equity loans and intermediate rents. Alongside these further Low Cost Home Ownership (LCHO) market sale options have also emerged such as starter homes and 'pocket' homes such as those delivered by Pocket Living, where high density, high quality design compact flats are delivered on small, mainly brownfield, sites with a 20% discount to the market value in perpetuity for first time buyers meeting locally agreed criteria as a condition of planning consent. It also notes that Homes England and the Mayor of London have recognised the potential of options such as 'pocket homes' to help address affordability issues in high priced areas and have provided some funding for site assembly to developers like Pocket Living.

 

It therefore requests the Strategic Director to bring a detailed report on Intermediate Market Housing to the Housing Scrutiny Committee to clarify the different options and the ongoing joint work with other councils and partners such as the Great Cambridge Partnership and Combined Authority to increase provision for the 'squeezed middle' who live or work in Cambridge.

 

 

 

18/49/CNLc

Councillor Smart - Motion on Brexit

“Cambridge is an international city that relies on working with people and organisations across the world, including all European countries.

 

Cambridge City Council expresses its deep concern about the expected damage to our city and residents from the continued failure of the Government over Brexit, and the projected impact on Cambridge of the Government’s proposals.

 

We ask the Leader of the Council to

- write to the Prime Minister to make clear how her Government is putting Cambridge at risk

- share this with our local MPs, and support Cambridge MP Daniel Zeichner in achieving the best possible outcome for Cambridge.”

 

 

Minutes:

Councillor Smart proposed and Councillor Smith seconded the following motion:

 

“Cambridge is an international city that relies on working with people and organisations across the world, including all European countries.

 

Cambridge City Council expresses its deep concern about the expected damage to our city and residents from the continued failure of the Government over Brexit, and the projected impact on Cambridge of the Government’s proposals.

 

We ask the Leader of the Council to

- write to the Prime Minister to make clear how her Government is putting Cambridge at risk

- share this with our local MPs, and support Cambridge MP Daniel Zeichner in achieving the best possible outcome for Cambridge.”

 

Councillor Cantrill proposed and Councillor Dalzell seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struck through and additional text underlined):

 

Cambridge is an international city that relies on working with people and organisations across the world, including all European countries. The residents of Cambridge voted overwhelmingly to remain part of the EU during the referendum in 2016.  That commitment to be part of the EU has continued following the referendum, as demonstrated from the support for campaigning organisations such as Cambridge Stays and their call for a Peoples Vote.  

 

Cambridge City Council expresses its deep concern about the expected damage to our city and residents from the continued failure of the Government over Brexit, and the projected impact on Cambridge of the Government’s proposals. It is disappointed that at this critical point in determining our country’s future path, Her Majesty’s  Official Opposition are sitting on their hands, divided, while the country desperately needs clear and principled leadership.  As a result, they are aiding the Government’s pursuit of a BREXIT policy based on contradiction, confusion and chaos.

 

Cambridge City Council believes that the public should have the right to decide at the end of the negotiations, to vote on whether to press ahead or to exit from BREXIT.

 

We ask the Leader of the Council to

- write to the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Official Opposition to make clear how their actions are putting Cambridge at risk

- share this with our local MPs, and support Cambridge MP Daniel

Zeichner in achieving the best possible outcome for Cambridge.”

 

- Write to our local MPs, Daniel Zeichner and Heidi Allen seeking their public commitment to the public to have a right to decide at the end of the negotiations – a peoples vote

 

On a show of hands the amendment was lost by 13 votes to 23.

 

Councillor Bick proposed and Councillor Gehring seconded the following amendment to motion (additional text underlined):

 

Councillor Bick altered his amendment with the Council’s consent under Council Procedure Rule 26 to replace on the second line the word ‘committee’ with ‘group’.

 

Cambridge is an international city that relies on working with people and organisations across the world, including all European countries.

 

Cambridge City Council expresses its deep concern about the expected damage to our city and residents from the continued failure of the Government over Brexit, and the projected impact on Cambridge of the Government’s proposals.

 

We ask the Leader of the Council to

- write to the Prime Minister to make clear how her Government is putting Cambridge at risk

- share this with our local MPs, and support Cambridge MP Daniel Zeichner in achieving the best possible outcome for Cambridge.

 

-Agree with South Cambridgeshire District Council to evolve its proposed members' “Brexit Advisory Group” as soon as practical into a joint group between the two councils to assess the impact of Brexit on our shared economy, as prompted by the Interim Report of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Economic Review.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried unanimously.

 

Resolved (unanimously) that:

 

Cambridge is an international city that relies on working with people and organisations across the world, including all European countries.

 

Cambridge City Council expresses its deep concern about the expected damage to our city and residents from the continued failure of the Government over Brexit, and the projected impact on Cambridge of the Government’s proposals.

 

We ask the Leader of the Council to

- write to the Prime Minister to make clear how her Government is putting Cambridge at risk

- share this with our local MPs, and support Cambridge MP Daniel Zeichner in achieving the best possible outcome for Cambridge.

 

-Agree with South Cambridgeshire District Council to evolve its proposed members' “Brexit Advisory Group” as soon as practical into a joint group between the two councils to assess the impact of Brexit on our shared economy, as prompted by the Interim Report of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Economic Review.

 

Members unanimously resolved to continue the meeting after 10:30pm rather than adjourn to another day.

 

18/49/CNLd

Councillor McGerty - A GoodGym for Cambridge

Noting the potential to get fit and do good through volunteering with the GoodGym movement; its success elsewhere in helping isolated older people with practical tasks and avoiding loneliness; and the 495 local residents who have already signed up online to express an interest; this Council calls on the Executive Councillor for Communities to make contact with the organisation and explore ways in which the council could support the development of a Cambridge GoodGym group.

 

Ref: https://www.goodgym.org/proposals/cambridge

 

Minutes:

Councillor McGerty proposed and Councillor Nethsingha seconded the following motion:

 

Noting the potential to get fit and do good through volunteering with the GoodGym movement; its success elsewhere in helping isolated older people with practical tasks and avoiding loneliness; and the 495 local residents who have already signed up online to express an interest; this Council calls on the Executive Councillor for Communities to make contact with the organisation and explore ways in which the council could support the development of a Cambridge GoodGym group.

 

Ref: https://www.goodgym.org/proposals/cambridge

 

Resolved (unanimously) to support the motion.

 

18/50/CNL

Written questions

No discussion will take place on this item. Members will be asked to note the written questions and answers document as circulated around the Chamber.

 

Minutes:

Members were asked to note the written question and answer that had been placed in the information pack circulated around the Chamber.