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Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, The Guildhall, Market Square, Cambridge, CB2 3QJ

Contact: Democratic Services  Committee Manager

Note: This meeting is a continuation of the Council meeting from 24 February 2022. Under Council Procedure Rule 13.3.1 Motion 9c is withdrawn. 

Media

Items
No. Item

22/6/CNL

Public questions time

Minutes:

Question 1

  i.  Councillors will be aware of our campaign with the RNIB and Cam Sight to address concerns about pavement parking. Since COVID lockdowns commenced the habit of parking cars on, or across, the pavement has increased substantially and shows no signs of abating now that restrictions have eased. Some of you may have visited our website at stumblingstreets.com, viewed the video produced by the RNIB or seen the gallery showing some of the many instances that have been photographed. 70% of the photos on that site were taken in the first two weeks of February and they must represent only a fraction of the reality. 

  ii.  While representing a nuisance for all pedestrians, pavement parking is a major issue for particular groups.  Wheelchair and mobility scooter users as well as parents with prams or buggies are often forced into the road to get around the vehicles. For the blind and partially sighted they represent a hazard with real potential dangers. One they are now likely to encounter at least once in almost every outing. If active travel policies are ever to work, barriers like this need to be reduced not, as they are now, allowed to grow unchecked.

  iii.  We are, of course, aware that the City Council has no powers to address this and similar problems under the current arrangements. We believe it has a major role to play, nonetheless. Will this Council and its members now agree to press the County Council and the Highways and Transport Committee for swift action to bring an end to the worst manifestations of what is rapidly becoming an epidemic, one that negates the positive work of the Active Travel Team? 

  iv.  First it is important to emphasise to the County Council and especially to the Highways and Transport Committee that they absolutely do have the powers to address the problem. These were bestowed on all local authorities including Cambridge by ‘special authorisation’ in February 2011 given by the then Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Norman Baker, to prohibit parking on footways and verges, wherever they considered it necessary. This would be exercised through a traffic regulation order (TRO, or ETRO).  A copy of that authorisation could be made available.

  v.  Secondly, this Council can refuse to accept the obfuscation, buck passing and denial of responsibility that seems to have greeted past complainants. Thirdly they can make it clear that, apart from London where there is a blanket ban, pavement parking has been, or is being, successfully tackled in cities like Peterborough and Sheffield through the use of TROs in localities where the problem is worst. This is easier and generally more acceptable than city wide action. Councillors can identify and nominate local hotspots for consideration. Finally, this Council can suggest that, if initial schemes have sufficient scope, any action could be self-funding through the administration of fines.

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport said the following:

 

  i.  Thanked the public speaker for drawing the work of Living Streets Cambridge in this area to the Council’s attention. 

  ii.  This issue would be very familiar to Councillors across Cambridge who recognised the difficulties it can cause and the obstacles that many residents experienced.

  iii.  Agreed with the points that had been raised and would press Cambridgeshire County Council as the Highways Authority to ensure the concerns raised could be discussed and solutions found.

  iv.  Was aware that Cambridgeshire County Council had consulted with the London based national organisation representing disability interest Transport for All to work through many of the objectives raised.

  v.  Had requested a meeting with the relevant Councillors, Officers and the public speaker and hoped it would take place in the next couple of weeks from this meeting.

 

Question 2

  i.  How can we further accelerate the deployment of rapid, effective, no-brainer investment in housing insulation and heat saving retrofit across all council properties, as well as suitable local incentives for private dwellings, especially private rented dwellings - which is surely the most critical and comparatively easy priority for a sudden and significant reduction in fossil usage in the city, as well as significantly reducing cost of living, utility bills for as many local residents as possible.

  ii.  Would the Council commit to swiftly investing in these choices, and incentive private landlords and homeowners to undertake this work.

 

 

 

The Executive Councillor for Housing said the following:

  i.  Since 2020, the Council had been fitting external wall insultation and solar panels to council owned properties, with a programme of 150 solid wall properties in Arbury, to be completed this year at a cost of £3.2million.  Those residents should save at least £200 per annum on energy bills as the energy rating had gone from D to B

  ii.  In the new financial year, £1.9million had been allocated from the housing revenue account (HRA) to retrofit another 60 council houses.

  iii.  In combination with the HRA, using local authority delivery funding where applicable, and the social housing decarbonisation fund, there were plans to retrofit more council properties in 2023.

  iv.  The Council also had ongoing planned works for loft insulation for all council dwellings and cavity wall insulation for 148 council dwellings benefiting in 2021/22.

  v.  £5million had been allocated from the HRA to deliver a net zero carbon housing project in 2022/23.

  vi.  A package of energy efficiency measures across 50 different council home types would assist in calculating zero carbon measures required for all existing council dwellings. Evidence from this project would help assist with the Council’s request to Government for more funding.

 vii.  £365million was required to retrofit all council homes to energy rating B standard, but the HRA could not fund this. The Council was applying to every grant funding stream available, but the Government also needed to meet this challenge.

viii.  The Council were part of The Great Homes Upgrade campaign to lobby the Government to upgrade all homes.

  ix.  The Council would look at the planned maintenance programme and if funds were available and could be allocated for appropriate works, there was the flexibility to do so.

 

The Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment and City Centre said the following:

  i.  With regards to private owned and privately rented properties there were a number of initiatives being pursued by the Council; working in partnership with all Cambridgeshire districts to deliver retrofit to Cambridgeshire residents through the Action on Energy programme with the service planned to start in July 2022.

  ii.  There were a number of projects designed to provide residents advice and support on how to retrofit their homes.

  iii.  Two high level retrofit studies had been commissioned to identify what energy efficiency and renewable energy measures would need to be installed for different property archetypes in Cambridge. A building control project was also launched last year to provide homeowners energy advice through thermal imaging. The private rented sector would also be targeted through the minimum energy efficiency standards.

 

Question 3

  i.  On the 22 July 2021, the Council unanimously passed a motion outlining its concerns about the implications of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill on Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities. With the Bill in its final stages having completed all its readings in the House and the Lords, it is due to enter the Commons for final consideration of the Lords amendments Monday, 28 February before proceeding for Royal Assent. Although a number of amendments on the rights to protest have been changed, there has been little movement on the provisions regarding the criminalisation of the Traveller way of life, the power of police to seize Gypsy and Traveller homes, to fine Gypsies and Travellers up to £2,500 and to imprison those who continue to follow a nomadic way of life because of the lack of safe legal stopping places.

  ii.  Since the passing of the Council’s motion last year there had been 7 evictions. The GRT community were asked to participate in the GTANA but they declined to do so stating that the Council had no relationship with the GRT community.  Trust needed to be built with the GRT community.

  iii.  What plans does the Council have in place now to supply legal stopping places and transit sites for Gypsies and Travellers passing through Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire?

  iv.  This is now an issue of great urgency. There are no legitimate grounds for delay.

 

Question 4

  i.  I am delighted that the council stood in solidarity with the Gypsy Roma and Traveller community against Jimmy Carr's appearance at the Corn Exchange in February. I was at the protest and delighted to see some councillors there.

  ii.  However, it is disappointing that the council does not currently have a negotiated stopping policy and continues to carry out evictions. I note that in their meeting of 22nd July 2021, councillors voted through a motion in which they committed to “Stand in solidarity with Traveller and Gypsy communities in Cambridge and continue to build trust and good relations with them”. However, councillors also voted down an amendment which would – among other things – have made provision for negotiated stopping in Cambridge. Negotiated stopping has a proven track record in providing secure housing and service provision for Travellers. It also eases tensions with local communities and, in Leeds, has saved the council £230,000 on clean-up and enforcement costs.

  iii.  I understand that Cambridge City Council was the only council in Cambridgeshire to carry out an eviction during the first COVID lockdown. As a Labour Party member, I am concerned that a Labour council would allow this. The motion of solidarity passed last July is encouraging but it is time to go further than words and take meaningful action to back up the rhetoric.

  iv.  I understand that the council may have considered the idea of negotiated stopping in the past. Will the City Council and its members act in accordance with its words of support for the GRT community, and commit to a formal negotiated stopping policy now, such as has been adopted in Leeds?'

 

SOURCES

 

https://democracy.cambridge.gov.uk/mgAi.aspx?ID=27720

https://www.negotiatedstopping.co.uk/ns-explained 

https://www.cambridgeindependent.co.uk/news/cambridge-city-council-to-stand-in-solidarity-with-travell-9208931/

https://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/cambridge-news/traveller-communities-face-systemic-racism-21960286

 

The Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Wellbeing responded to questions 3 and 4 together:

  i.  Agreed this issue was a matter of urgency and did not intend to delay. 

  ii.  Fully supported negotiated stopping places as an alternative solution for the Gypsy, Roma, and Traveller (GRT) community to stop safely and legally.

  iii.  In the case of Cambridge City Council, the current availability of unused pieces of council owned land, which could feasibly serve as a temporary legal stopping place was a significant limiting factor. Given these limitations our current approach in respect of GRT encampments on our land was a de facto negotiated stopping agreement, which included agreeing stopping time and services to be provided by the Council. These services include welfare assessments, water, rubbish disposal and sanitation. In most cases, such as on our parks and open spaces, stopping can be agreed for weeks or in some case months (eg. Coldham’s Common in 2019).

  iv.  As said previously, any need for transit site provision needed to be included in the Greater Cambridge Local Plan; and therefore clear evidence of GRT need was required. A Gypsy & Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment (GTANA) was the recognised way of doing this.

  v.  Recognised that GTANAs had their limitations, which included the willingness and trust of the GRT community to be interviewed. Unfortunately, the Covid-19 pandemic (with lockdown starting just before interviews across the study area were due to take place) had inevitably had an impact this time round due to delays in carrying out surveys and additional reluctance of some individuals and families to be interviewed face to face.  She had been reassured that the consultants were now completing these interviews.

  vi.  She attended the Corn Exchange and welcomed the show of solidarity with the GRT community from a whole cross section of the Cambridge community against GRT racism.

 vii.  Had spoken with a member of the GRT community whilst at the Corn Exchange and asked what the Council could do to support the GRT community. Their response was to provide stopping places. To support stopping places, un-used sites needed to be found.

viii.  Would work with neighbouring councils to understand what needs there were and how these needs could be met.

 

Question 5

  i.  The woefully inadequate provision of formal sports pitches at the proposed North East Cambridge development is on tonight’s agenda.

  ii.  What is the prospect of the new development getting a bigger share of sports facilities that the council’s own policy says it should bring?  

  iii.  Why shouldn’t sports pitches and a swimming pool be part of the promise of a five-minute community that the council is promoting to its future residents?

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport said the following:

  i.  The proposed development at north east Cambridge would not be coming forward for the next 10-15 years.

  ii.  Would work towards the full requirement of sports facilities contained within the current adopted Local Plan being delivered on site or close by.

  iii.  There was nothing within the North East Cambridge Area Action Plan preventing all sports facility provision being provided on-site.

  iv.  Noted that further debate on the matter would take place during item 22/10/CNLb.

 

Question 6

  i.  Why are there insufficient rubbish and recycling bins throughout Castle Ward. What plans has the Council got in place to properly reflect the increasing pedestrian traffic in the Ward to ensure litter reduction?

 

The Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment and City Centre said the following:

  i.  Dog waste (preferably bagged) could be disposed of in any litter bin.

  ii.  Tackling the environmental and financial impacts of litter was a priority across all wards in Cambridge. The Council was currently developing a Litter Strategy, which included a litter bin review (which would look at the location, size and type of bins).

  iii.  A resident’s survey had been undertaken and responses stated that litter impacted on resident’s satisfaction of where they lived and their wellbeing.

  iv.  Detailed litter issues could be sent to the Executive Councillor and would be shared with officers as part of the litter bin review.

 

The following questions were not asked during the meeting, written responses where available, would be provided following the meeting.

 

Question 7

  i.  The City Council is to be congratulated on its successful application, with South Cambridgeshire District Council, for funding to undertake restoration work on the city’s chalk streams and their critically important biodiversity.  Would it therefore not be appropriate to also provide statutory protection, in the form of Local Nature Reserve (LNRs), for all those streams that meet the criteria for such designation?  As has been found globally, restoration of biodiversity and its habit is of little value unless the areas involved are also protected and suitable measures put in place to reduce the threats that led to deterioration in the first place. The 11 LNRs in Cambridge include Nine Wells and Byron’s Pool, but no other chalk stream habitat.

  ii.  Cherry Hinton Brook is a particularly important example and is currently designated only as a City Wildlife Site, which carried no statutory weight.  The Brook meets the key criteria for designation as an LNR in terms of local importance for wildlife, education and enjoyment (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/create-and-manage-local-nature-reserves).  It has a very healthy population of breeding water voles (a protected species), visiting otters and a rich bird diversity including kingfisher, egret and water rail.  It is enormously popular as a leisure spot, attracts many birdwatchers and photographers, and is also used for educational school visits.  There is an active group of volunteers involved with maintenance and restoration activities, and who would help to prepare the required management plan.  Would the Council consider looking at the feasibility of designating Cherry Hinton Brook as an LNR, thus demonstrating the Council’s full commitment to the protection of this unique habitat?

 

Question 8

  i.  Given that the upper Cam is classed by the Environment Agency as being of 'poor' water quality, and that, as we have established for ourselves by professionally validated microbial testing, the principal source of polluting faecal bacteria are from upstream sewage treatment works can the Greater Cambridge Partnership not put a great deal more pressure on the Water Companies (particularly Anglian Water) to improve their performance so that our Cam valley rivers reach at least 'good' water quality status?

 

Question 9

  i.  I gather "up to 12 streets will be selected where local residents can volunteer to clear their street spaces to avoid herbicide use"

(www.cambridgeindependent.co.uk/news/herbicide-free-trials-to-begin-in-two-cambridge-wards-and-9238734).

  ii.  It's an excellent initiative, and when I posted a message about it on our Belvoir Road WhatsApp group, I discovered there was lots of support and many willing volunteers.

  iii.  How do we go about getting Belvoir Road selected?

 

In response the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Wellbeing said the following:

  i.  To be selected you will need to register your interest using an online form and the council will then help you to consult other local residents and neighbours to reach a consensus of support and then if successful, the council will work with your street to become herbicide free.

  ii.  The Council has developed a range of web-based support material to help with community communications and build volunteer capacity.

  iii.  The 12 selected streets would be supported by the Council’s Streets and Open Spaces Community Engagement service, who would also make resources available, as required, such as tools, signs, gloves, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22/6/CNLa

Leader and Executive Councillor for Strategy: Corporate Plan 2022-27 pdf icon PDF 176 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 25 votes to 0):

i.  To agree the Corporate Plan as attached to the agenda.

 

22/7/CNL

To consider the recommendations of Committees for adoption

22/7/CNLa

Licensing Committee: Review of Statement of Gambling Principles pdf icon PDF 93 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously):

i.  To approve for publication the Statement of Gambling Principles set out in Appendix A of the officer’s report.

22/7/CNLb

Civic Affairs: Appointing Person: Arrangements for the Appointment of the External Auditor pdf icon PDF 167 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously):

i.  To agree the Public Sector Audit Appointments Ltd (PSAA) as the appointing person for the council.

ii.  To delegate acceptance of the invitation to the Head of Finance, as the council’s Section 151 Officer.

22/7/CNLc

Civic Affairs: Pay Policy Statement 2022/23 pdf icon PDF 174 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Bick proposed and Councillor Porrer seconded the following amendment to the recommendations (additional text underlined):

 

  i.  To approve the draft Pay Policy Statement 2022/23 attached as Appendix 1 of the Officer’s report.

  ii.  To delegate authority to the Head of Human Resources to update the Pay Policy Statement 2022/23 should a chief executive and/or chief officer and/or NJC pay award be agreed.

  iii.  To ask the committee to reconsider its decisions (iv) and (v) in relation to Chief Executive and Director performance appraisal, allowing further discussion to take place first, in the meantime leaving the existing process in place. 

 

The Committee also agreed:

  iv.  Unanimously - To note the update on the review of senior officer salaries which was scheduled for late 2021 and has now been moved until 2022 due to the delay in the national pay award settlement for 2021 and the forthcoming review of the senior management structure.

  v.  By 4 votes to 2 - For director performance reviews to be undertaken by the Chief Executive, as outlined in Section 5 of the officer’s report.

  vi.  By 4 votes to 2 - For chief executive performance reviews to be undertaken by the Leader, as outlined in Section 5 of the officer’s report.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was lost by 9 votes in favour to 21 against.

 

Resolved (by 30 votes to 3):

  i.  To approve the draft Pay Policy Statement 2022/23 attached as Appendix 1 of the Officer’s report.

  ii.  To delegate authority to the Head of Human Resources to update the Pay Policy Statement 2022/23 should a chief executive and/or chief officer and/or NJC pay award be agreed.

 

 

 

22/7/CNLd

Civic Affairs: Amendment to the Constitution Part 4A Appendix F (A) - Protocol on Media Relations pdf icon PDF 166 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously):

i.  That sections 1-3 of Part 4A Appendix F(A) of the constitution be deleted, as illustrated in Appendix A of the officer’s report.

 

 

22/7/CNLe

Civic Affairs: Member Allowances Scheme / Virtual Area Committees pdf icon PDF 185 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 22 votes to 0):

i.  To approve the Members Allowances Scheme as amended.

ii.  To approve that the Area Committees continue virtually for the March cycle 2022 as set out in paragraph 1.6 of the officer’s report.

 

22/8/CNL

To Pass a Resolution of Thanks to Councillor Bird for Mayoral Year February 2019 to May 2020

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously), on the proposal of Councillor McPherson, seconded by Councillor Porrer that:

i.  The Council expressed its appreciation of the manner in which the duties of Mayor were discharged by Councillor Gerri Bird and her consort Alan Pooley, during their period of office February 2019 to May 2020 and that the Common Seal be affixed to a copy of the resolution.

22/9/CNL

To deal with oral questions

Minutes:

1) Councillor Bick to theExecutive Councillor for Finance and Resources

How does the Executive Councillor feel about the extensive overseas marketing of the new private housing on council-owned sites at Ironworks (the former Mill Road Depot) and Timberworks (Cromwell Road) being constructed by the Council’s joint venture with Hill?

 

Executive Councillor Response:

Was not aware of any extensive overseas marketing of the private housing on the council owned sites at Cromwell Road and Mill Road. Was aware of the recent Youtube video promoting the site, this was un-authorised and had not been commissioned by Cambridge Investment Partnership (CIP) and the Sales Manager was seeking to get this removed.  Two online council promoted events had taken place. Sales were restricted to individual purchasers rather than bulk sales. There was a guide level of 25% of sales to overseas buyers.

 

2) Councillor S Baigent to the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Well being

Can the Executive Councillor give an update on the city’s food justice work and, in particular, comment on whether there are any plans for Cambridge to become a Right to Food City?

 

Executive Councillor Response:

The Council played an active role within the city’s Food Poverty Alliance and were long term supporters of a whole range of food justice programmes, which includes holiday hunger projects, food hubs and emergency food aid. The Food Poverty Alliance was vital during the pandemic and the Council planned to continue its support. Work now was moving from food poverty to food justice. Would be exploring the ‘Right to Food’ campaign with the Food Poverty Alliance.

 

3) Councillor Sargeant to the Executive Councillor for Communities

We hear a lot about the allocation of community grants, but sometimes less about what happens to those grants. Could the executive councillor please update us on the outcomes of some of the activities which have received funding in previous years?

 

Executive Councillor response:

Every award made was monitored against activity and outcomes contained within the grant agreement. A few example case studies included: the Money Advice Centre (MAC) and debt advice. John came to the MAC with a folder detailing his debts. It took over 100 hours to work out what debt he had and who he owed money to. This work was undertaken by MAC staff and volunteers. John would be debt free in a few months. He had turned his life around and the MAC was thrilled to have worked with him. Another example included the Meadows Children and Family wing funding which was used for a family support project. 

 

Councillors thanked Jackie Hanson for all the work she had undertaken with the Grants Team and the community, she would be missed following her retirement. 

 

4) Councillor Hauk to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport

Could the Executive Councillor please confirm that she is committed to working with the Cambridge South station development process to ensure that Hobson's Park and its vital biodiversity and amenity areas are protected as much as possible during and after any works that may take place.

 

Executive Councillor response:

Strong statements had been made by officers in the Shared Planning Service, the Street and Open Spaces Team and Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Wellbeing to the recent public examination regarding the proposals for Cambridge South Station. This included objecting to the proposals for a number of reasons, including concerns about the implications on Hobson’s Park. As a result of substantial engagement and the council’s objections the promoters of the station made a number of amendments to the proposals aimed at reducing the impacts of the construction phase and ensuring that the final post-construction mitigation proposals met the Council’s biodiversity and recreational objectives. Subject to these changes the Council was then able to support the proposals.

 

5) Councillor D.Baigent to the Executive Councillor for Housing

Can the Exec Cllr provide information on the additional winter support for rough sleepers in Cambridge?

 

Executive Councillor response:

The severe weather emergency provision (SWEP) consisted of several communal spaces where people could sleep for the night, with the expectation that they would vacate the building the following morning. This winter 20 beds were available at the Cross Way site in Chesterton through the charity ‘It takes a city’ with grant funding and support including from the Council. Beds were available to rough sleepers who were identified by the Outreach Team and were locally connected to the city. In previous arrangements bed were only available during periods of severe weather. From November 2021 – 28 February 2022, winter provision was open permanently, this was also to be extended into March if there was a period of severe weather, which would have triggered the SWEP. This was a much more stable environment allowing each resident to have their own room. The facility also sought to enable residents to move on to suitable long term accommodation. The Street Outreach Team also sought to contact all known rough sleepers during the stormy weather to ensure that they had appropriate accommodation.

 

6) Councillor Hauk to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport

Following the recent collapse of a roof wall in Whittle Avenue, Trumpington, during storm Eunice, what is the Council doing and what will it do to ensure that the new developments are and will be built up to the required and expected standards, especially with respect to the health and safety of their residents.

 

Executive Councillor response:

Storm Eunice was an extreme case and effected some buildings across the country and in Cambridge. As soon as the council became aware of the issue, a building control officer visited the location and discussions took place with the management agent and owners to ensure the safety of residents within the building. Responsibility for building safety sat with the person carrying out the construction work and inspections were carried out during construction by Building Control Surveyors (either by Approved Inspectors or the local authority Building Control Service).  The Council was currently trying to raise awareness with architects and agents, residents and communities of the importance of complying with the minimum standards of building control through a number of awareness sessions which were open to all and were taking place virtually. Were investigating about engaging with developers and agents at the earliest point within the build process to secure a voluntary commitment to building control standards which may be above the minimum standards.  The City Council did not undertaken the building control work on the Whittle Avenue development.

 

7) Councillor Bird to theExecutive Councillor for Communities

Following on from the council's recent stand on racism against Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) communities, what will be taking place to enhance our community development work with those communities and to promote and celebrate GRT culture

 

Executive Councillor response:

As part of the transformation programme, the work undertaken in the Communities Team was being reviewed, including whether what the council currently does meets the needs of the communities and if there was anything that the council needed to do differently. As part of this work it was being explored whether a new post was required to specially support GRT families and the community. Felt it was important to give a platform to celebrate GRT culture. A specific project was being set up, which would be held at the Corn Exchange. There would also be activities at Midsummer Fair too.

 

8) Councillor Payne to the Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment and City Centre

Does the Executive Councillor think that there is a fundamental problem with Green Bin collection in Cambridge?

 

Executive Councillor response:

She did not think there was a fundamental problem with the green bin collection in Cambridge, the Greater Cambridge Shared Waste Team had been doing an outstanding job during the covid-19 pandemic. The staff worked day in and day out when many others could work safely from home. The service had been impacted by staff illness. There was also a shortage of agency workers who would normally have been employed to fill any gaps. The service had also been impacted by Brexit and the HGV driver shortages. The council had a statutory duty to collect residual waste and recycling; green bin collection was a discretionary service. When there was a staffing shortage blue and black bin collections were therefore prioritised. Acknowledged recently that 30% of green bins had been unable to be collected on time but crews had worked over time to catch up.

 

The following oral questions were tabled but owing to the expiry of the period of time permitted, were not covered during the meeting.

 

9) Councillor Sweeney to the Leader of the Council

Given the Government's recent announcement that it is going to remove most of the remaining covid protections, what is the leader's message to Cambridge residents?

 

10) Councillor Pounds to the Executive Councillor for Housing

Can the Exec Cllr for Housing give an update on the government’s ‘First Homes’ policy

 

11) Councillor Payne to the Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment and City Centre

Can the Executive Councillor offer an update on the development towards a city-wide litter strategy?

 

12) Councillor Lee to the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Well Being

Whilst noting that national regulation is needed for pavement and highway usage, will the Executive Councillor agree to work cross party within the city, with our County colleagues and with local volunteer groups to look at how best to promote the safe use of (legal) e-bikes and e-scooters and deter antisocial and illegal use across our city council open spaces and shared paths, moving at speed and often without lights, putting pedestrians and vulnerable road users at risk?

 

13) Councillor Copley to the Leader of the Council

Despite covid restrictions being rolled back, a number of residents are still vulnerable and / or shielding due to their health conditions. How can the council best support these residents as they continue living with uncertainty and personal covid risk?

 

14) Councillor Scutt to the Executive Councillor for Communities

Can the executive councillor provide an update on the plans for lending, loaning and reuse projects in the city?

 

15) Councillor H. Davies to the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Well being

Council has been really encouraged to see the start of the herbicide-free trial this year. Can the Executive Councillor update members on progress so far, and timescales for action?

 

16) Councillor Dalzell to the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Well Being

Our Council owns a number of enclosed green spaces that do provide important refuge for nature. When these sites are licensed for use by third parties, what steps does the Council take to ensure that local wildlife is suitably protected?

 

17) Councillor Porrer to the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Well being

Could the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces please provide an update on the proposed electricity supply to the centre of Parker's Piece, which is going to be essential to stop future fossil fuel use at events contracted with the council to take place on this land.

 

18) Councillor Healy to the Executive Councillor for Open Spaces, Sustainable Food and Community Well being

Can the Executive Councillor update members on the partnership working with other local councils to support the national scheme to resettle Afghan refugees?

 

19) Councillor D Baigent to the Leader of the Council

What is the leader's response to the recent levelling up white paper?

 

22/10/CNL

To consider the following notices of motion, notice of which has been given by:

22/10/CNLa

Councillor Robertson: Fuel Poverty

There is a serious threat of fuel poverty to many residents of Cambridge

 

In the last few months international energy costs have risen dramatically. In response the government have announced a scheme to increase the cap on energy bills, and provide some compensation through council tax rebates and pay back loans. However it is apparent there are serious flaws in this scheme.

 

New analysis from Joseph Rowntree Foundation finds that, even after the new deferral scheme for energy bills and council tax discount are taken into account, once the new energy price cap kicks in:

·  Families on low incomes will spend on average 16% of their incomes after housing costs on energy bills. This compares to 5% for middle-income families

·  Single adult households on low incomes will spend a shocking 43% on average of their income after housing costs on energy bills

·  Lone parent families on low incomes will spend 22% on average of their income after housing costs on energy bills

·  Some families on low incomes will face annual bills as high as £2,326 from April

·  For low-income families with children, the measures will mitigate just 36% of the increase in their bills on average. This compares to 59% for low-income single-adult households.

·  Around three-quarters of people eligible for the council tax discount announced are not in poverty

 

Cambridge City Council calls on the Government to act now and far more effectively on the national crisis in energy prices and unsustainable supply, to protect thousands of low and middle income Cambridge residents who will get nothing from the council tax rebate plan or payback loan. We call on the government to take the following actions:

1.  Increase substantially the Warm Homes Discount for poorer households, and expand the category of households eligible to include all in receipt of either Pension Credit or working age benefits

2.  Allow households heated through communal heating schemes to be eligible for the energy cap as they are currently treated as commercial customers and excluded

3.  Levy windfall taxes on fossil fuel producing companies

4.  Remove from energy bills the burden of paying the debts of failed energy companies since OFGEM failed to require them to protect themselves against wholesale cost increases

5.  Remove environmental levies from energy bills and pay for them from general taxation.

6.  Cut VAT on energy bills and insulation at least until energy bills return to more usual levels

7.  Set up a National Renewable Energy Fund for long term investment in energy efficiency by homeowners, council and other social landlords, private rental tenants and small to medium sized businesses

 

We ask our Council leader to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, copied to our two MPs, making the case for intervention and pointing out that the proposed scheme to reimburse people via the council tax system, fails to help thousands of families in need or lead to long term investment to cut future bills and end the use of fossil fuels for domestic heating and power  ...  view the full agenda text for item 22/10/CNLa

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) that:

 

There is a serious threat of fuel poverty to many residents of Cambridge

 

In the last few months international energy costs have risen dramatically. In response the government have announced a scheme to increase the cap on energy bills, and provide some compensation through council tax rebates and pay back loans. However it is apparent there are serious flaws in this scheme.

 

New analysis from Joseph Rowntree Foundation finds that, even after the new deferral scheme for energy bills and council tax discount are taken into account, once the new energy price cap kicks in:

·  Families on low incomes will spend on average 16% of their incomes after housing costs on energy bills. This compares to 5% for middle-income families

·  Single adult households on low incomes will spend a shocking 43% on average of their income after housing costs on energy bills

·  Lone parent families on low incomes will spend 22% on average of their income after housing costs on energy bills

·  Some families on low incomes will face annual bills as high as £2,326 from April

·  For low-income families with children, the measures will mitigate just 36% of the increase in their bills on average. This compares to 59% for low-income single-adult households.

·  Around three-quarters of people eligible for the council tax discount announced are not in poverty

 

Cambridge City Council calls on the Government to act now and far more effectively on the national crisis in energy prices and unsustainable supply, to protect thousands of low and middle income Cambridge residents who will get nothing from the council tax rebate plan or payback loan. We call on the government to take the following actions:

1.  Increase substantially the Warm Homes Discount for poorer households, and expand the category of households eligible to include all in receipt of either Pension Credit or working age benefits

2.  Allow households heated through communal heating schemes to be eligible for the energy cap as they are currently treated as commercial customers and excluded

3.  Levy windfall taxes on fossil fuel producing companies

4.  Remove from energy bills the burden of paying the debts of failed energy companies since OFGEM failed to require them to protect themselves against wholesale cost increases

5.  Remove environmental levies from energy bills and pay for them from general taxation.

6.  Cut VAT on energy bills and insulation at least until energy bills return to more usual levels

7.  Set up a National Renewable Energy Fund for long term investment in energy efficiency by homeowners, council and other social landlords, private rental tenants and small to medium sized businesses

 

We ask our Council leader to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, copied to our two MPs, making the case for intervention and pointing out that the proposed scheme to reimburse people via the council tax system, fails to help thousands of families in need or lead to long term investment to cut future bills and end the use of fossil fuels for domestic heating and power in Britain.

22/10/CNLb

Councillor Dalzell: North East Cambridge Area Action Plan

Council calls on the Executive Councillor for Planning & Transport to consider with her scrutiny committee options for the on-site achievement of more of the local plan policy standard for sports facilities as soon as these can be developed by officers, and then to reconsider her decision to approve the currently proposed Reg 19 version of the Area Action Plan in the light of this.

Minutes:

Councillor Dalzell proposed and Councillor Bick seconded the following motion:

 

Council calls on the Executive Councillor for Planning & Transport to consider with her scrutiny committee options for the on-site achievement of more of the local plan policy standard for sports facilities as soon as these can be developed by officers, and then to reconsider her decision to approve the currently proposed Reg 19 version of the Area Action Plan in the light of this.

 

Councillor Thornburrow proposed and Councillor S.Smith seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struckthrough additional text underlined):

 

Council calls on the Executive Councillor for Planning & Transport to consider with her scrutiny committee options for the on-site achievement of more of the local plan policy standard for sports facilities as soon as these can be developed by officers, and then to reconsider her decision to approve the currently proposed Reg 19 version of the Area Action Plan in the light of this.

 

Council calls on the Executive Councillor for Planning & Transport to consider with the scrutiny committee and in discussion with the Council’s sport and leisure team, options for the on-site achievement of more of the local plan policy standard for sports facilities. This should be part of a wide and comprehensive review being undertaken on the Greater Cambridge Local Plan, and within the context of her decision to accept the recommendation of the Planning and Transport Scrutiny Committee to approve the currently proposed Reg 19 version of the Area Action Plan.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 18 votes to 7.

 

Resolved (by 20 votes to 0):

 

Council calls on the Executive Councillor for Planning & Transport to consider with the scrutiny committee and in discussion with the Council’s sport and leisure team, options for the on-site achievement of more of the local plan policy standard for sports facilities. This should be part of a wide and comprehensive review being undertaken on the Greater Cambridge Local Plan, and within the context of her decision to accept the recommendation of the Planning and Transport Scrutiny Committee to approve the currently proposed Reg 19 version of the Area Action Plan.

 

 

22/10/CNLc

Councillor Copley: Non-harmful Advertising Policy

Advertising of products and activities that are, or are potentially harmful to mental or physical health, or are incompatible with limiting global heating to 1.5°C and preventing biodiversity loss are very common on our television screens, radios, social media feeds and across a variety of out-of-home advertising media. Advertising is known to promote behaviour which can be damaging to individual and/or planetary health, including overconsumption which is a key driver of climate and ecological breakdown. The consumption of the average UK citizen, if followed by all citizens globally would require 2.6 Earths worth of resources.

 

There is however a strong precedent for halting harmful forms of advertising. Tobacco advertising and sponsorship on billboards and in printed publications were banned from 2003, and tobacco sponsorship of international sport from 2005. The Greater London Authority (GLA), which controls Transport for London (TFL) property, enacted a Healthier Food Advertising Policy in 2018 prohibiting High Fat, Sugar or Salt (HFSS) food advertising on TFL property. Liverpool City Council passed a ‘Low Carbon Advertising Policy’ motion (aimed at excluding advertising of polluting cars, Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), airline flights and fossil fuel companies); Bristol City Council banned advertising of HFSS food, gambling and payday loans on those sites for which it has responsibility; and Norwich City councillors have unanimously supported developing a policy to limit harmful categories of advertising and sponsorship such as gambling, “junk food” and environmentally-damaging products.

 

Cambridge should be following these examples as a matter of urgency, in line with it’s commitment to the health and wellbeing of the city’s residents, and it’s declarations of climate and biodiversity emergencies, and recent stated commitment to the goal of the Paris Climate Agreement to limit global heating to 1.5°C. The very purpose of advertising is to stimulate demand for goods and services, and that some of those goods and services undermine the council’s objectives regarding public health, air pollution and sustainability.

 

This council resolves to:

 

1.  Given the harmful effects to individual and planetary health that the promotion of harmful activities and products can have, ask officers to explore and report back to the relevant scrutiny committee of the policy, legislative, financial and contractual constraints and implications of the implementation of a non-harmful advertising policy (including products and services that can contribute to poor physical or mental health, high carbon emissions, air pollution and biodiversity loss).

2.  To formally submit a policy proposal to the next phase of the emerging Local Plan regarding digital advertising boards, which entails a presumption against granting planning applications for all new digital advertising screens in the City due to the high reported electricity use of these technologies.

3.  Write to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport, asking for a ban on advertising that is harmful to mental or physical health, or incompatible with the Paris Climate Agreement to limit global heating to 1.5°C, nationally, noting that in Italy, a ‘Dignity Decree’ was introduced in 2018 that banned all advertisements for gambling services on  ...  view the full agenda text for item 22/10/CNLc

Minutes:

This motion was withdrawn by Councillor Copley under Council Procedure Rule 13.

22/10/CNLd

Councillor Payne: Cambridge's Response to the Spiking Crisis

Council notes:

·  Drink spiking can affect anybody, but statistics show that the majority of victims, as well as those most likely to feel unsafe due to the risk of drink spiking are women and those of marginalised genders. 

·  That the parliamentary Home Affairs Committee opened a new enquiry into drink spiking on 12th January 2022.

·  That the worrying trend of injection spiking has received a raised profile in the media recently.  This highly dangerous practice has caused increased concern for users of the night-time economy. 

·  That there were 43 reports of drink spiking made to Cambridgeshire Constabulary between January and October 2021.

·  That Anglia Ruskin University Students’ Union has raised direct concerns about drink spiking in an open appeal to clubs in Cambridge to ensure there are safety measures in place to prevent drink spiking such as providing drink covers and serving drinks directly into the hands of the customer. 

·  That Cambridge University Students’ Union has issued guidance to university event organisers to improve safety at nighttime events.

·  That Cambridgeshire Constabulary have recently received a large grant to improve safety in the nighttime economy and have issued drink testing kits to clubs in Cambridge and Peterborough.

 

Council believes:

·  Spiking is entirely the fault of the perpetrator and never the victim. 

·  Everyone has the right to feel and be safe at night.

·  While preventative measures are required to limit the impact of drink spiking in the short-term, education is required to ensure a long-term cultural change.

 

Council will:

·  Continue to work with our partners in the nighttime economy, including but not limited to pubs and club owners, the police and CAMBAC, to emphasise the need for urgent action to tackle drink spiking.

·  Produce an easily accessible information resource to share with the universities and nighttime economy venues and publicise this through the council’s channels, to educate and inform people about what to do if they believe they have been a victim of spiking, including how to take care of themselves or a friend, and where to report the incident to.

·  Encourage all venues serving alcohol to provide free drink stop tops and covers to prevent spiking, as well as education for club bouncers and security staff about how to recognize and advise someone who may have been spiked or injected and commit to offering funding for this in the next budget cycle, following an assessment of the demand and options available. 

·  Bring a report to the next Environment and Communities Committee to outline the activities of other partners across the city to prevent drink spiking, and to make recommendations to the Committee which identify further steps the Council can take to facilitate and support this work.

 

References
Anglia Ruskin Students’ Union Safer Nights Out appeal:
https://www.angliastudent.com/news/article/union/Safer-Nights-Out/

Cambridge University Students’ Union guidance for party organisers: https://www.cambridgesu.co.uk/news/article/jobs/BEST-Night-Out-Support-for-Event-Organisers/

 

Minutes:

Councillor Payne proposed and Councillor Lee seconded the following motion:

 

Council notes:

·  Drink spiking can affect anybody, but statistics show that the majority of victims, as well as those most likely to feel unsafe due to the risk of drink spiking are women and those of marginalised genders. 

·  That the parliamentary Home Affairs Committee opened a new enquiry into drink spiking on 12th January 2022.

·  That the worrying trend of injection spiking has received a raised profile in the media recently.  This highly dangerous practice has caused increased concern for users of the night-time economy. 

·  That there were 43 reports of drink spiking made to Cambridgeshire Constabulary between January and October 2021.

·  That Anglia Ruskin University Students’ Union has raised direct concerns about drink spiking in an open appeal to clubs in Cambridge to ensure there are safety measures in place to prevent drink spiking such as providing drink covers and serving drinks directly into the hands of the customer. 

·  That Cambridge University Students’ Union has issued guidance to university event organisers to improve safety at nighttime events.

·  That Cambridgeshire Constabulary have recently received a large grant to improve safety in the nighttime economy and have issued drink testing kits to clubs in Cambridge and Peterborough.

Council believes:

·  Spiking is entirely the fault of the perpetrator and never the victim. 

·  Everyone has the right to feel and be safe at night.

·  While preventative measures are required to limit the impact of drink spiking in the short-term, education is required to ensure a long-term cultural change.

Council will:

·  Continue to work with our partners in the nighttime economy, including but not limited to pubs and club owners, the police and CAMBAC, to emphasise the need for urgent action to tackle drink spiking.

·  Produce an easily accessible information resource to share with the universities and nighttime economy venues and publicise this through the council’s channels, to educate and inform people about what to do if they believe they have been a victim of spiking, including how to take care of themselves or a friend, and where to report the incident to.

·  Encourage all venues serving alcohol to provide free drink stop tops and covers to prevent spiking, as well as education for club bouncers and security staff about how to recognize and advise someone who may have been spiked or injected and commit to offering funding for this in the next budget cycle, following an assessment of the demand and options available. 

·  Bring a report to the next Environment and Communities Committee to outline the activities of other partners across the city to prevent drink spiking, and to make recommendations to the Committee which identify further steps the Council can take to facilitate and support this work.

 

References
Anglia Ruskin Students’ Union Safer Nights Out appeal:
https://www.angliastudent.com/news/article/union/Safer-Nights-Out/

Cambridge University Students’ Union guidance for party organisers: https://www.cambridgesu.co.uk/news/article/jobs/BEST-Night-Out-Support-for-Event-Organisers/

 

Councillor Gilderdale proposed and Councillor Collis seconded the following amendment to motion (additional text underlined):

 

Council notes:

·  That misogyny, sexism, and gender-based violence are all rooted in inequality and an abuse of power. This form of violence is mainly committed towards women and girls, and includes stalking, harassment, and sexual abuse.

·  That trans women and women of colour are also more likely than cisgender people to experience violent victimisation.

·  That data on gender-based violence is often inaccurate, with reporting and conviction rates remaining shockingly low.

·  That, amid national debates last year around women’s safety, police forces recorded a record number of rape offences in England and Wales, while the ONS reported that sexual offences had increased by 8%. Drink spiking must therefore be understood within the broader context of gender-based violence which, as a council we are actively combatting while striving to support all victims of abuse and harassment.

·  People’s safety across the city, particularly at night, is of utmost importance to the council and local organisations.

·  Harassment and drink spiking can affect anybody, but statistics show that the majority of victims, as well as those most likely to feel unsafe due to the risk of drink spiking are women and those of marginalised genders.

·  It is understood that many of these crimes go unreported yet are widely witnessed across the Night Time Economy (NTE). Statistics from a StoppTops survey show that 97% of drink spiking cases are not reported.

·  That the parliamentary Home Affairs Committee opened a new enquiry into drink spiking on 12th January 2022.

·  That the worrying trend of injection spiking has received a raised profile in the media recently. Both drink spiking and injection spiking are highly dangerous, premeditated, and criminal practices which have caused increased concern for users of the night-time economy.

·  That there were 43 reports of drink spiking made to Cambridgeshire Constabulary between January and October 2021.

·  That Anglia Ruskin University Students’ Union has raised direct concerns about drink spiking in an open appeal to clubs in Cambridge to ensure there are safety measures in place to prevent drink spiking such as providing drink covers and serving drinks directly into the hands of the customer.

·  That Cambridge University Students’ Union has issued guidance to university event organisers to improve safety at night-time events.

·  Many campaigns note that simply increased security presence in venues is not an effective deterrent for gender-based violence, and therefore we must think critically about effective ways of challenging these issues at their root.

·  That Cambridgeshire Constabulary have recently received a large grant to improve safety in the night-time economy and have issued drink testing kits to clubs in Cambridge and Peterborough.

·  That Cambridge BID has been awarded Purple Flag status since 2019, an award for safe management of the night-time economy (NTE). Safety is a priority area for any Purple Flag accreditation, alongside maintaining the vibrancy and diversity of nightlife in the city.

·  That, in 2021, the Council ran a Welfare and Vulnerability Engagement (WAVE) training event to increase skills, knowledge and confidence of those working in licenced premises. 15 venues attended as well as Porters’ Lodges, transport, police, city council, hotel, and security staff.

 

Council believes:

·  NTE venues across Cambridge have a duty to their patrons to create a safe environment. Spiking is entirely the fault of the perpetrator and never the victim. Therefore, it is important that all venues have appropriate procedures in place to support any victims of assault or spiking.

·  Everyone has the right to feel and be safe at night, not only in venues, but in open spaces and public transport across the city. Residents’ safety requires a joined-up approach working together for a safer Cambridge.

·  While preventative measures are required to limit the impact of drink spiking in the short-term, education is required to ensure a long-term cultural change.

 

Council will:

·  Work with key partner agencies across the city, taking proactive action towards the prevention of harassment and spiking, to make Cambridge a safe place for all at night.

·  Explore the possibility of signing up to accreditation schemes, such as Best Bar None or Good Night Out, to set a zero-tolerance policy towards harassment and spiking for all council-run events, setting a standard which can be encouraged in venues across the city.

·  Continue to work with our partners in the night time economy, including but not limited to pubs, venues and club owners, Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin Universities and Students’ Unions, hospitals, Cambridge BID, the police and CAMBAC, to emphasise the need for urgent action to tackle drink spiking. In particular, close partnership working with Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin Universities, Students’ Unions and Sixth Forms who have direct contact with students who play a large role in the NTE.

·  Continue running WAVE training throughout the year to ensure venue staff across the city are able to identify vulnerability and safely make appropriate interventions.

·  Produce an easily accessible information resource to share with the universities and NTE venues and publicise this through the council's channels, to educate and inform people. This could include debunking common misconceptions about harassment, how to respond to harassment, speaking out if you have concerns about someone's behaviour, what to do if you believe you have been a victim of spiking, including who to go to, how to take care of yourself or a friend, and where to report the incident to.

·  Encourage all venues serving alcohol to provide free drink stop tops and covers to prevent spiking, as well as education for club bouncers and security staff about how to recognize and advise someone who may have been spiked or injected and commit to offering funding for this in the next budget cycle, following an assessment of the demand and options available.

·  Work with Cambridge BID to develop an application to retain our Purple Flag status for the following three years from 2022.

·  Bring a report to the next Environment and Communities Committee to outline the activities of other partners across the city to prevent drink spiking, and to make recommendations to the Committee which identify further steps the Council can take to facilitate and support this work.

 

References

 

Anglia Ruskin Students’ Union Safer Nights Out appeal: https://www.angliastudent.com/news/article/union/Safer-Nights-Out/

Cambridge University Students’ Union guidance for party organisers: https://www.cambridgesu.co.uk/news/article/jobs/BEST-Night-Out-Support-for-Event-Organisers/

Best Bar None UK: https://bbnuk.com/

Good Night Out Campaign: https://www.goodnightoutcampaign.org/info/

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 21 votes to 0.

 

Resolved (unanimously):

 

Council notes:

·  That misogyny, sexism, and gender-based violence are all rooted in inequality and an abuse of power. This form of violence is mainly committed towards women and girls, and includes stalking, harassment, and sexual abuse.

·  That trans women and women of colour are also more likely than cisgender people to experience violent victimisation.

·  That data on gender-based violence is often inaccurate, with reporting and conviction rates remaining shockingly low.

·  That, amid national debates last year around women’s safety, police forces recorded a record number of rape offences in England and Wales, while the ONS reported that sexual offences had increased by 8%. Drink spiking must therefore be understood within the broader context of gender-based violence which, as a council we are actively combatting while striving to support all victims of abuse and harassment.

·  People’s safety across the city, particularly at night, is of utmost importance to the council and local organisations.

·  Harassment and drink spiking can affect anybody, but statistics show that the majority of victims, as well as those most likely to feel unsafe due to the risk of drink spiking are women and those of marginalised genders.

·  It is understood that many of these crimes go unreported yet are widely witnessed across the Night Time Economy (NTE). Statistics from a StoppTops survey show that 97% of drink spiking cases are not reported.

·  That the parliamentary Home Affairs Committee opened a new enquiry into drink spiking on 12th January 2022.

·  That the worrying trend of injection spiking has received a raised profile in the media recently. Both drink spiking and injection spiking are highly dangerous, premeditated, and criminal practices which have caused increased concern for users of the night-time economy.

·  That there were 43 reports of drink spiking made to Cambridgeshire Constabulary between January and October 2021.

·  That Anglia Ruskin University Students’ Union has raised direct concerns about drink spiking in an open appeal to clubs in Cambridge to ensure there are safety measures in place to prevent drink spiking such as providing drink covers and serving drinks directly into the hands of the customer.

·  That Cambridge University Students’ Union has issued guidance to university event organisers to improve safety at night-time events.

·  Many campaigns note that simply increased security presence in venues is not an effective deterrent for gender-based violence, and therefore we must think critically about effective ways of challenging these issues at their root.

·  That Cambridgeshire Constabulary have recently received a large grant to improve safety in the night-time economy and have issued drink testing kits to clubs in Cambridge and Peterborough.

·  That Cambridge BID has been awarded Purple Flag status since 2019, an award for safe management of the night-time economy (NTE). Safety is a priority area for any Purple Flag accreditation, alongside maintaining the vibrancy and diversity of nightlife in the city.

·  That, in 2021, the Council ran a Welfare and Vulnerability Engagement (WAVE) training event to increase skills, knowledge and confidence of those working in licenced premises. 15 venues attended as well as Porters’ Lodges, transport, police, city council, hotel, and security staff.

 

Council believes:

·  NTE venues across Cambridge have a duty to their patrons to create a safe environment. Spiking is entirely the fault of the perpetrator and never the victim. Therefore, it is important that all venues have appropriate procedures in place to support any victims of assault or spiking.

·  Everyone has the right to feel and be safe at night, not only in venues, but in open spaces and public transport across the city. Residents’ safety requires a joined-up approach working together for a safer Cambridge.

·  While preventative measures are required to limit the impact of drink spiking in the short-term, education is required to ensure a long-term cultural change.

 

Council will:

·  Work with key partner agencies across the city, taking proactive action towards the prevention of harassment and spiking, to make Cambridge a safe place for all at night.

·  Explore the possibility of signing up to accreditation schemes, such as Best Bar None or Good Night Out, to set a zero-tolerance policy towards harassment and spiking for all council-run events, setting a standard which can be encouraged in venues across the city.

·  Continue to work with our partners in the night time economy, including but not limited to pubs, venues and club owners, Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin Universities and Students’ Unions, hospitals, Cambridge BID, the police and CAMBAC, to emphasise the need for urgent action to tackle drink spiking. In particular, close partnership working with Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin Universities, Students’ Unions and Sixth Forms who have direct contact with students who play a large role in the NTE.

·  Continue running WAVE training throughout the year to ensure venue staff across the city are able to identify vulnerability and safely make appropriate interventions.

·  Produce an easily accessible information resource to share with the universities and NTE venues and publicise this through the council's channels, to educate and inform people. This could include debunking common misconceptions about harassment, how to respond to harassment, speaking out if you have concerns about someone's behaviour, what to do if you believe you have been a victim of spiking, including who to go to, how to take care of yourself or a friend, and where to report the incident to.

·  Encourage all venues serving alcohol to provide free drink stop tops and covers to prevent spiking, as well as education for club bouncers and security staff about how to recognize and advise someone who may have been spiked or injected and commit to offering funding for this in the next budget cycle, following an assessment of the demand and options available.

·  Work with Cambridge BID to develop an application to retain our Purple Flag status for the following three years from 2022.

·  Bring a report to the next Environment and Communities Committee to outline the activities of other partners across the city to prevent drink spiking, and to make recommendations to the Committee which identify further steps the Council can take to facilitate and support this work.

 

References

 

Anglia Ruskin Students’ Union Safer Nights Out appeal: https://www.angliastudent.com/news/article/union/Safer-Nights-Out/

Cambridge University Students’ Union guidance for party organisers: https://www.cambridgesu.co.uk/news/article/jobs/BEST-Night-Out-Support-for-Event-Organisers/

Best Bar None UK: https://bbnuk.com/

Good Night Out Campaign: https://www.goodnightoutcampaign.org/info/

22/11/CNL

Written questions

No discussion will take place on this item. Members will be asked to note the written questions and answers document as circulated around the Chamber.

 

Minutes:

Members were asked to note the written questions and answers contained in the information pack.

22/12/CNL

Officer Urgent Decision

22/12/CNLa

Appointment of Council Representatives to the Conservators of the River Cam pdf icon PDF 108 KB

Minutes:

The decision was noted.