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Items
No. Item

21/7/CNL

Apologies

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Councillors Ashton, Sheil and Tunnacliffe and Councillor McPherson provided apologies for lateness.

 

Councillors Page-Croft and Sargeant indicated that they would need to leave the meeting part way through.

 

Councillor

Item

Interest

Councillor Davey

21/10/cnclc

Personal: Was a member of the Board of Trustees of Centre 33, who ran work for Young Carers for County Council and was involved in the tender of the organisation for the County Council contract.

 

21/8/CNL

To consider the recommendations of Committees for adoption

21/8/CNLa

Civic Affairs: Pay Policy Statement 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 183 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously):

i.  Approved the draft Pay Policy Statement 2021/22 attached as Appendix 1 of the Officer’s report.

ii.  Delegated authority to the Head of Human Resources to update the Pay Policy Statement 2021/22 should a chief executive and/or chief officer and/or NJC pay award be agreed.

21/8/CNLb

Civic Affairs: Member Allowances - review by the Independent Remuneration Panel pdf icon PDF 188 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously):

i.  Approved the 2020/21 allowance scheme (attached to the officer’s report) and that it is not index linked for 2021/22 (ie. kept at the rate for 2020/21).

21/8/CNLc

Licensing Committee: Statement of Licensing Policy pdf icon PDF 179 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously):

i.  Considered the results of the public consultation exercise as summarised in Appendix B of the Officer’s report.

ii.  Approved the amended Statement of Licensing Policy attached to the Officer’s report as Appendix D. Appendix C included tracked changes showing the amendments that have been made.

21/8/CNLd

Licensing Committee: Cumulative Impact Assessment pdf icon PDF 177 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously):

  i.  Considered the results of the public consultation exercise as summarised in Appendix B of the Officer’s report and the information provided by Cambridge Constabulary and Public Health before the public consultation as attached to the Officer’s report as Appendix C.

  ii.  Approved the proposed Cumulative Impact Assessment attached to the Officer’s report as Appendix D. Appendix E is the current section in the Statement of Licensing Policy on the cumulative impact of a concentration of licensed premises.

 

 

 

21/9/CNL

To deal with oral questions

Minutes:

Question  1

 

From: Cllr Payne

To: Ex Cllr for Climate Change,Environment and City Centre

 

After a Liberal Democrat motion highlighted the dramatic increase in littering over the summer months, the Environment and Community Scrutiny Committee recently unanimously supported a new litter strategy.  While work on this strategy begins, what immediate steps will the Council take to try to prevent another inundation of litter as outdoor socialising begins?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

Officers had worked tirelessly during the pandemic. The Executive Councillor did not agree there was a litter problem in the city in 2020. There was some littering in known hot spots and the cleansing team cleared these areas before daytime use of the open spaces commenced. Littering was a general issue experienced by local authorities across the country during the pandemic. Following publication of the Government roadmap out of lockdown, officers were meeting to discuss ways forward and what measures needed to be put in place in advance of the summer period, including advice, guidance and enforcement.

 

Question  2

 

From: Cllr Gehring

To: Leader

 

Brexit continues to be a greatly unsettling process, especially for EU citizens. How is the Council ensuring that EU citizens will excercise their right to vote in the upcoming local elections for Council, County, P&C Commissioner and Metromayor?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

The Council continued to give its full support to EU citizens. It was a key priority to make EU citizens aware that they could and were welcome to vote. A leaflet was to be sent out with all council tax bills giving advice regarding the EU resettlement scheme and also about registering to vote. The Cambridge Matters magazine would be sent to all households in Cambridge and would contain articles regarding the EU resettlement scheme and advice regarding voting. In May every political position was up for election in Cambridge except the MP and it was therefore vital that everyone who was entitled to vote could vote. Urged people to apply for a postal vote to ensure that they could exercise their democratic right.

 

Question  3

 

From: Cllr O'Reilly

To: Leader

 

What are the city council’ s priorities so Cambridge recovers strong when COVID is beaten?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

The well organised vaccination programme in Cambridge was helping but the city wasn’t fully protected yet. Noted and agreed that people needed to stick to the Covid rules set out in the Government’s roadmap. Recovery needed to be based on the virus being controlled. There were four forms of recovery: economic, social, environmental and the council itself. Economic and social recovery were linked. The city had 2,100 additional people claiming universal credit. The Council would be working closely with its partners to get the recovery right. The Council would need to improve the way it delivered its services with less finance.

 

Question  4

 

From: Cllr Bird

To: Ex Cllr for Communities

 

What is the council doing to support LGBTQ+ history month?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

LGBTQ+ history month celebrated the lives and achievements of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities. It ensured stories were heard and voices were not silenced; their contribution to history had often been ignored. The City Council was proud to support and fund this month in February. Thanked the Encompass Network for their online events. Noted that there was still a lot of work to do and noted an extract from the Equality Pledge which stated ‘Wanted Cambridge to be a safe, welcoming and inclusive place’.

 

Question  5

 

From: Cllr Matthews

To: Ex Cllr for Planning Policy and Open Spaces

 

The planning department appears to be becoming stricter with the timelines available to councillors to “call-in” applications so that they can be decided by the planning committee. Are there clear guidelines for councillors on when to call-in applications to committee? Could councillors be given clarity in writing on how the planning department’s discretionary powers are now being applied to call-ins after the official deadlines?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

Wasn’t aware that Officers were becoming stricter with timelines for councillors to ‘call in’ applications. The procedure for the ‘call in’ of an application to Planning Committee were set out in the Planning Committee Scheme of Delegation which was contined in the Council’s Constitution. This was reviewed as part of the Statement of Community Involvement which was updated in 2019. The procedure stated that within 21 days of the date of publication of the weekly list or within 14 days of any significant amendments any member including County Council members representing a city ward could request in writing that the application should be determined by the Planinng Committee. The request had to include the planning grounds on which the request was based. Timelines were strict as planning applications needed to be determined in accordance with statutory timescales.

 

Question  6

 

From: Cllr McGerty

To: Ex Cllr for Transport and Community Safety

 

Wednesday’s meeting of the Greater Cambridge Partnership Joint Assembly provided some interesting updates on plans to ease congestion and resulting pollution around the Cambridge Biomedical Campus, including progress on Cambridge South Station, the Cambridge Southeast Transport scheme and various walking and cycling projects. Would the leader of the council join me in welcoming these measures?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

Transport around the two hospitals was key for patients, visitors and staff. Noted that further hospitals were due to be built on the site. Welcomed improvements to the biomedical campus especially walking, cycling and sustainable transport improvements.

 

Question  7

 

From: Cllr Baigent

To: Leader

 

What obligations do local political parties in Cambridge have to follow Government national safety guidance during the current lockdown on campaigning?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

Everyone needed to follow the Covid rules, including political parties.  Subject to safety precautions, policitical parties were able to start campaigning from the 8 March 2021.

 

Question  8

 

From: Cllr Porrer

To: Leader

 

Would the Leader of the council agree that we need to continue to make representations to the ONS (Office of National Statistics) to ensure that the Census on 21st March 2021 fully accounts for those in our community who may not currently be resident in our city. In particular those in our EU and International student populations who may not have had accommodation in the city over the pandemic, and who won't otherwise be counted.

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

The census was vital and provided high quality data. There were problems with the 2011 census as this underestimated the number of students at Anglia Ruskin University and Cambridge University. Cambridge was a dynamic city with a lot of movement.  A significant number of students, researchers, academics, post graduates and people from the hospitality sector would not be in the city when the census took place. The risk was that the census severely underestimated Cambridge’s population and deprived the city of funding for health, schools, police and councils. Asked everyone to complete the census. Was disappointed that the Government did not follow the Scottish Government and hold the census in 2022.

 

Question  9

 

From: Cllr Hadley

To: Ex Cllr for Planning Policy and Open Spaces

 

Are there any interesting outcomes from Draft Chalk Stream Project Report?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

There were lots of interesting outcomes from the report. For each stretch of the chalk streams, 9 features were assessed and ranked red, amber or green representing poor, moderate and good state. The emphasis was on the ecological quality of the streams. Only 1 stretch had a feature without a red designation, 2 stretches had 7, 12 stretches were designated red because they had invasive species. 11 stretches had weirs or barriers which disrupted the passage of fish. 8 stretches were designated red because the flow regime did not support biodiversity. Only 1 stretch was designated green for flow and that had a caveat that it had become more prone to low flows in the last 10 years. 46 projects had been put forward for improvments as a result of the report totalling an estimated £300,000. Would be working with South Cambs District Council, the County Council and Water Resources East and their partners.

 

Question  10

 

From: Cllr Sheil

To: Ex Cllr for Housing

 

Can the Executive Councillor provide an update on the council’s work helping support rough sleepers during the pandemic into sustainable, longer-term housing placements?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

Since the beginning of the pandemic 297 offers of accommodation had been made, this included repeated refusals and offers to previously evicted people.  As at 19 February 2021, there were 37 rough sleepers in temporary accommodation. Since March 2020, 132 people had been moved into longer term accommodation or had found an alternative permanent solution. In terms of longer term accommodation options had agreed with landlords in the private sector for 10 properties for rent and had the council had agreed to pay the rent to these landlords. Funding for this had come from a grant from the Ministry of Housing Communities and Local Government. There were 4 modular homes at Dundee Close and 6 in Kings Hedges were due to go online in March. 6 further modular homes had been given permission at Barnes Close in Abbey.

 

Question  11

 

From: Cllr Thittala

To: Leader

 

Given the Covid 19 impact on the BAME community, what measures are in place to provide additional support to the community in Cambridge?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

The Council and its partners had been in regular contact with different minority ethnic groups and organisations across the city. This included the mosque and the Ethnic Community Forum. The Council had focussed on hard to reach groups including those most at risk. Ethnicity was a big issue in the pandemic, welcomed the response of leaders in those communities. Noted a number of people in Cambridge did not use English as their first language.

 

Question  12

 

From: Cllr McQueen

To: Ex Cllr for Communities

 

What impact does the executive councillor think that universal credit has had on the people of Cambridge?

 

The Executive Councillor responded:

There was a 5-week delay before people were able to receive their money, which forced people into debt if they took out a loan. The default to 1 payment per household was problematic if people were victims of domestic abuse. The Council had done what it could to mitigate the negative impacts of Universal Credit including the provision of a dedicated universal credit support officer, a financial inclusion officer, retained the Council Tax Reduction Scheme and funded an outreach worker at the Citizens Advice Bureau. There were 1218 claimants on the Council Tax Reduction Scheme in February 2020, this had doubled to 2458. A fair system was required which did not patronise or punish people. 

 

Details of the oral questions which were tabled but were not covered during the meeting can be found in the Information Pack via Agenda for Council on Monday, 1st March, 2021, 6.30 pm - Cambridge Council.

 


21/10/CNL

To consider the following notices of motion, notice of which has been given by:

21/10/CNLa

Councillor Bick: The future of Cambridge city centre

Council is aware of the large structural changes in the retail sector occurring during the pandemic, both reflecting and accelerating the trend towards online shopping, and that recent bankruptcies impact a significant proportion of retail space in Cambridge city centre;

 

Council believes that this has the potential for profound impact not only on the precious environment in the centre itself but also on the economic and social contribution it makes to the whole of our city and beyond; that this represents a challenge beyond straight-forward bounce-back recovery; and that it is therefore timely and opportune to start a conversation to take stock of the centre's recent evolution and to re-imagine it for the future, using a placemaking approach in the public interest. 

 

It resolves that the council, as the city’s representative body and, with its key roles in planning, streets & open spaces and commercial property ownership, should lead this process, working with partners and stakeholders and involving the public: the broad aim of the exercise to maintain the city centre as a destination of vitality and jobs for local people, and of hospitality to its many visitors, in a way which complements its identity as historic university city encircled by public open spaces and residential areas and growing city quarters with neighbourhood centres of their own. 

 

In the process it urges consideration of:

  • means of facilitating a larger and much stronger range of local independent shops, including start-ups, making the centre a destination for retail that is genuinely differentiated from elsewhere and what is online
  • ensuring a secure future for a thriving, popular 7-day market which works for customers and traders
  • the changing nature of physical retail for ongoing high street businesses, in particular the key anchor presences 
  • the demand for co-working spaces which builds on remote and flexible working trends outside the home, which seem likely to have a post pandemic legacy
  • the role that a larger arts and culture offering might play
  • the importance of conserving the city’s heritage
  • developing a pipeline of public realm schemes such as the market square, available to capitalise on the likely availability of government funding for city centre improvements
  • faster development of improved public transport access and cycle parking and completion of the traffic-free goal envisaged in our “Making space for People” process
  • the need for continued strong challenge to national planning policy proposals under which even more switches between use classes may become 'permitted development' and therefore beyond local planning policy and control.

Council requests the Chief Executive to bring an initial report to the July meeting of Strategy & Resources Scrutiny Committee on how the council can most effectively start to take this matter forward. 

 

Minutes:

Councillor Bick proposed and Councillor Porrer seconded the following motion:

 

Council is aware of the large structural changes in the retail sector occurring during the pandemic, both reflecting and accelerating the trend towards online shopping, and that recent bankruptcies impact a significant proportion of retail space in Cambridge city centre;

 

Council believes that this has the potential for profound impact not only on the precious environment in the centre itself but also on the economic and social contribution it makes to the whole of our city and beyond; that this represents a challenge beyond straight-forward bounce-back recovery; and that it is therefore timely and opportune to start a conversation to take stock of the centre's recent evolution and to re-imagine it for the future, using a placemaking approach in the public interest. 

 

It resolves that the council, as the city’s representative body and, with its key roles in planning, streets & open spaces and commercial property ownership, should lead this process, working with partners and stakeholders and involving the public: the broad aim of the exercise to maintain the city centre as a destination of vitality and jobs for local people, and of hospitality to its many visitors, in a way which complements its identity as historic university city encircled by public open spaces and residential areas and growing city quarters with neighbourhood centres of their own. 

 

In the process it urges consideration of:

  • means of facilitating a larger and much stronger range of local independent shops, including start-ups, making the centre a destination for retail that is genuinely differentiated from elsewhere and what is online
  • ensuring a secure future for a thriving, popular 7-day market which works for customers and traders
  • the changing nature of physical retail for ongoing high street businesses, in particular the key anchor presences 
  • the demand for co-working spaces which builds on remote and flexible working trends outside the home, which seem likely to have a post pandemic legacy
  • the role that a larger arts and culture offering might play
  • the importance of conserving the city’s heritage
  • developing a pipeline of public realm schemes such as the market square, available to capitalise on the likely availability of government funding for city centre improvements
  • faster development of improved public transport access and cycle parking and completion of the traffic-free goal envisaged in our “Making space for People” process
  • the need for continued strong challenge to national planning policy proposals under which even more switches between use classes may become 'permitted development' and therefore beyond local planning policy and control.

Council requests the Chief Executive to bring an initial report to the July meeting of Strategy & Resources Scrutiny Committee on how the council can most effectively start to take this matter forward. 

 

Councillor Davey proposed and Councillor Moore seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struck through and additional text underlined):

 

Council is aware of the large structural changes in the retail sector occurring during the pandemic, both reflecting and accelerating the trend towards online shopping, and that recent bankruptcies impact a significant proportion of retail space in Cambridge city centre;

 

The pandemic has had a major impact on theCouncil believes that this has the potential for profound impact not only on the precious environment in of the city centre itself but and also on the economic and social contribution it makes to the whole of our city and beyond;. Equally concerning has been the effect of COVID 19 on neighbourhood shopping areas such as Mill Rd, Cherry Hinton Rd, Arbury Ct., Chesterton Road and Chesterton High St. Council recognises the work undertaken to date to prepare for the future and thanks all City Council staff for their outstanding endeavours over the last 12 months. Council notes the structural changes in the retail sector that have occurred over the last twelve months and of the significant challenge still to come. Therefore, it is timely to take stock, and review and coordinate our ongoing activity with an eye to the future.

that this represents a challenge beyond straight-forward bounce-back recovery; and that it is therefore timely and opportune to start a conversation to take stock of the centre's recent evolution and to re-imagine it for the future, using a placemaking approach in the public interest. 

 

We therefore welcome the proposed appointment of the Economic Recovery Officer as set out in the Budget Setting Report. It We also resolves that the council, as the city’s representative body and, with its key roles in planning, streets & open spaces and commercial property ownership, should continue to lead the process of preparing the City’s recovery, building on the effective work undertaken to date to respond to COVID19. This work should be undertaken in conjunction with the Cambridge Business Development (BID), established partnerships such as the GCP and the Combined Authority, working with stakeholders and actively involving the public.

lead this process, working with partners and stakeholders and involving the public: the broad aim of the exercise to maintain the city centre as a destination of vitality and jobs for local people, and of hospitality to its many visitors, in a way which complements its identity as historicuniversity city encircled by public open spaces and residential areas and growing city quarters with neighbourhood centres of their own. 

 

In the process it urges consideration of: The proposed Review will consider:

·  The work of the Economic Recovery Officer in facilitating the recovery of the city centre and neighbourhood shopping areas

  • means of facilitating offering a larger and much stronger broader range of local independent shops, including start-ups, making the centre a destination for retail and supporting the recovery of neighbourhood areas. that is genuinely differentiated from elsewhere and what is online
  • ensuring a secure future for a thriving, popular 7-day market which works for customers and traders
  • the changing nature of physical retail for ongoing high street businesses, in particular the key anchor presences 
  • the demand for co-working spaces which builds on remote and flexible working trends outside the home, which seem likely to have a post pandemic legacy
  • the role that a larger of arts and culture and offering might play
  • the importance of conserving the city’s heritage
  • developing a pipeline of reviewing the public realm schemes such as the market square, available to currently proposed thereby capitalisinge on the likely possible availability of government funding for city centre improvements
  • faster the development of improved public transport access and cycle parking and completion of the traffic-free goal envisaged in our “Making space for People” process
  • the need for to continued strong to challenge to the national planning policy proposals under which even more regarding switches between use classes which may become 'permitted development' and therefore beyond local planning policy and control.

Council requests the Chief Executive to bring a report to the July meeting of Strategy & Resources Scrutiny Committee on the ongoing work that the council has taken to respond to the needs of the City. an initial report to the July meeting of Strategy & Resources Scrutiny Committee on how the council can most effectively start to take this matter forward. 

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 21 votes to 0.

 

Resolved (by 21 votes to 0) that:

 

The pandemic has had a major impact on the precious environment of the city centre itself and also on the economic and social contribution it makes to the whole of our city and beyond. Equally concerning has been the effect of COVID 19 on neighbourhood shopping areas such as Mill Rd, Cherry Hinton Rd, Arbury Ct., Chesterton Road and Chesterton High St. Council recognises the work undertaken to date to prepare for the future and thanks all City Council staff for their outstanding endeavours over the last 12 months. Council notes the structural changes in the retail sector that have occurred over the last twelve months and of the significant challenge still to come. Therefore, it is timely to take stock, and review and coordinate our ongoing activity with an eye to the future.

 

We therefore welcome the proposed appointment of the Economic Recovery Officer as set out in the Budget Setting Report. We also resolve that the council, as the city’s representative body and, with its key roles in planning, streets & open spaces and commercial property ownership, should continue to lead the process of preparing the City’s recovery, building on the effective work undertaken to date to respond to COVID19. This work should be undertaken in conjunction with the Cambridge Business Development (BID), established partnerships such as the GCP and the Combined Authority, working with stakeholders and actively involving the public.

 

The proposed Review will consider:

·  The work of the Economic Recovery Officer in facilitating the recovery of the city centre and neighbourhood shopping areas

  • means of offering a broader range of local independent shops, including start-ups, making the centre a destination for retail and supporting the recovery of neighbourhood areas.
  • ensuring a secure future for a thriving, popular 7-day market which works for customers and traders
  • the changing nature of physical retail for ongoing high street businesses, in particular the key anchor presences 
  • the demand for co-working spaces which builds on remote and flexible working trends outside the home
  • the role of arts and culture and of conserving the city’s heritage
  • reviewing the public realm schemes currently proposed thereby capitalising on the possible availability of government funding for city centre improvements
  • the development of improved public transport access and cycle parking and completion of the traffic-free goal envisaged in our “Making space for People” process
  • to continue to challenge the national planning policy proposals regarding switches between use classes which may become 'permitted development' and therefore beyond local planning policy and control.

Council requests the Chief Executive to bring a report to the July meeting of Strategy & Resources Scrutiny Committee on the ongoing work that the council has taken to respond to the needs of the City.

 

21/10/CNLb

Councillor Massey: Domestic Abuse in the Workplace

As an organisation Cambridge City Council is committed to the Work to Stop Domestic Abuse campaign. Cambridge City Council fully recognise that for many people, the workplace is not just a vital source of independent income but can also be a source of support, which enables staff to be safe at home and at work. Much has been done by the Council to date, however the GMB has recently introduced a Charter which identifies good practice, and now is the time to review our practice using the Charter as a model.

Everyone has a responsibility to end domestic abuse and as an organisation, Cambridge City Council will commit to the following actions:

  • Train managers how to best support staff members experiencing domestic abuse
  • Ensure that all staff have access to a domestic abuse in a workplace toolkit
  • Every staff member will have access to our workplace policy, and we will actively take steps to ensure it is adhered to.
  • Commit to reviewing our existing Policy by May 2021 and monitoring the amended policy on a regular basis
  • Display domestic abuse national and local support/advice in workplaces across the organisation
  • Sign up to GMB Union’s ‘Work to Stop Domestic Abuse’ Charter.

 

 

Minutes:

Councillor Massey proposed and Councillor Davey seconded the following motion.

As an organisation Cambridge City Council is committed to the Work to Stop Domestic Abuse campaign. Cambridge City Council fully recognise that for many people, the workplace is not just a vital source of independent income but can also be a source of support, which enables staff to be safe at home and at work. Much has been done by the Council to date, however the GMB has recently introduced a Charter which identifies good practice, and now is the time to review our practice using the Charter as a model.

Everyone has a responsibility to end domestic abuse and as an organisation, Cambridge City Council will commit to the following actions:

  • Train managers how to best support staff members experiencing domestic abuse
  • Ensure that all staff have access to a domestic abuse in a workplace toolkit
  • Every staff member will have access to our workplace policy, and we will actively take steps to ensure it is adhered to.
  • Commit to reviewing our existing Policy by May 2021 and monitoring the amended policy on a regular basis
  • Display domestic abuse national and local support/advice in workplaces across the organisation
  • Sign up to GMB Union’s ‘Work to Stop Domestic Abuse’ Charter.

 

Resolved (unanimously) to support the motion.

 

 

 

21/10/CNLc

Councillor Payne: Young Carers' Action Day

Council commends the young people in Cambridge who selflessly provide care for others.

Council notes that:

• Recent research shows that one in five secondary school children may be a young carer. For many, their caring journey begins at a much younger age and can continue past 18.

• Caring for someone can be isolating, worrying and stressful. For young carers, this can negatively impact on their experiences and outcomes in education, having a lasting effect on their life chances. 

• Each year, The Carers Trust has organised a Young Carers’ Action Awareness Day. In 2021 this will be renamed Young Carers’ Action Day and marked on March 16.

• The purpose of the day is to raise public awareness of the challenges faced by young people and young adults because of their caring role, and to campaign for greater support for young carers to meet their needs.

Council resolves to:

  • Promote Young Carers Action Day as widely as possible on an annual basis, where possible particularly to young carers and their families.
  • To use the Spring edition of ‘Cambridge Matters’ to promote awareness of the valuable work of Centre 33 in supporting Young Carers.
  • To work with local businesses and higher and further education providers around Cambridge to promote awareness of young carers and to encourage them to work with The Carers' Trust to promote opportunities and support for this group of people.
  • Write to the County Council to express our willingness to form a partner alongside them, in their All Age Carers Strategy, when it is reviewed in 2022. 

 

 

Minutes:

Councillor Payne proposed and Councillor Chadwick seconded the following motion.

 

Council commends the young people in Cambridge who selflessly provide care for others.

Council notes that:

• Recent research shows that one in five secondary school children may be a young carer. For many, their caring journey begins at a much younger age and can continue past 18.

• Caring for someone can be isolating, worrying and stressful. For young carers, this can negatively impact on their experiences and outcomes in education, having a lasting effect on their life chances. 

• Each year, The Carers Trust has organised a Young Carers’ Action Awareness Day. In 2021 this will be renamed Young Carers’ Action Day and marked on March 16.

• The purpose of the day is to raise public awareness of the challenges faced by young people and young adults because of their caring role, and to campaign for greater support for young carers to meet their needs.

Council resolves to:

  • Promote Young Carers Action Day as widely as possible on an annual basis, where possible particularly to young carers and their families.
  • To use the Spring edition of ‘Cambridge Matters’ to promote awareness of the valuable work of Centre 33 in supporting Young Carers.
  • To work with local businesses and higher and further education providers around Cambridge to promote awareness of young carers and to encourage them to work with The Carers' Trust to promote opportunities and support for this group of people.
  • Write to the County Council to express our willingness to form a partner alongside them, in their All Age Carers Strategy, when it is reviewed in 2022. 

The Executive Councillor asked to note the Council’s thanks to the following organisations for their support to young carers:

Caring Together

 

Pinpoint - siblings and carers in Cambridgeshire

 

Big Sibs at Student Community Action

 

Young Sibs, a national organisation

 

Young Carers

 

The Carers Trust

Resolved (unanimously) to support the motion.

 

 

21/11/CNL

Written questions

No discussion will take place on this item. Members will be asked to note the written questions and answers document as circulated around the Chamber.

 

Minutes:

Members were asked to note the written questions and answers that had been published in the Information Pack via.