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Agenda and minutes

Venue: This is a virtual meeting.

Contact: Democratic Services  Committee Manager

Media

Items
No. Item

20/1/CNL

Minutes pdf icon PDF 360 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the 28 May 2020 were confirmed as a correct record and signed by the Mayor.

 

20/2/CNL

Mayor's announcements

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Councillor Summerbell.

 

The Mayor commented that his duties were not as they would usually be as all public gatherings had been put on hold. The Mayor had spent many hours with the Mayoress in the city visiting crisis food hubs, traders on the market and independent shops. He had also taken part in Teams meetings with cadets and charities. He would continue to visit as many people and businesses as he was able to.

 

The Mayor asked members to consider charities at this difficult time and also highlight the Mayors’ Charities for the year; Magpas Air Ambulance and SERV Suffolk and Cambridgeshire https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/mayoral-charities. Fundraising events were planned but unfortunately these were dependent on restrictions being eased.

 

VJ day was taking place on the 15 August more details would follow.

 

Name

Item

Interest

Councillor Moore

20/4/cnclb

Personal: Her children attend Netherhall School which has received a number of grants.

 

20/3/CNL

Public questions time

Minutes:

Members of the public asked a number of questions, as set out below.

 

1.

i.  He was a resident of West Chesterton, Governor of Chesterton Community College, volunteer at Cambridge Central Mosque and had set up 2 COVID-19 appeals.

ii.  He wanted to address the lack of engagement with food banks by BAME families, asylum seekers, refugees and migrant communities.

iii.  He had set up Cambridge City Food bank appeal, which had raised £19,000 and went directly to the food bank. Speaking with the food bank there was a lack of engagement with these communities and the food available was sometimes generic and did not meet dietary, religious or cultural requirements. This had led to a second appeal, the Cambridge Muslim COVID-19 response, which identified a significant un-met need for these communities, many of whom had no recourse to public funds and had fallen through the cracks.

iv.  Since April his group had spent £4000 through a hardship appeal for specialist food which food banks and other providers were not doing. There were 138 beneficiaries, 60% was on-going support and 40% had been helped in the last month; the number of beneficiaries was increasing. Support was mainly requested in CB4 postcodes but there were growing requests in the immediate areas.  As a crowder funder he had only been able to do this with the support of the Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum and Al Amin Stores in Mill Road. Most donations had come in Ramadan during the peak of the pandemic, and donations had since reduced.

v.  He hoped this un-met and un-known need would be addressed.

vi.  In light of the significant scaling down of support for BAME communities by volunteer organisations such as the Cambridge Central Mosque (post Ramadan), Mutual Aid Groups, other stakeholders and Crowdfunder's like himself, funds would run out in weeks.

vii.Asked what financial support the Council would provide to BAME communities now that the number of cases and referrals for assistance (food and utilities) was increasing when support was diminishing.

 

The Executive Councillor for Communities responded:

  i.  Wanted to express thanks for the fundraising and food provision which the Muslim community had provided especially during Ramadam.

  ii.  Cambridge City Council had been working with Cambridge Sustainable Food as part of the Food Poverty Alliance. This help was available to everyone and welcomed people to approach Cambridge Sustainable Food or one of the local food hubs.

  iii.  Cambridge Sustainable Food provision was largely vegetarian or vegan. Dietary needs are requested when people sign up and they were happy to respond to cultural needs when prompted.

  iv.  Cambridge Sustainable Food was working with food hubs to try and find out more information about what people would like which wasn’t currently available.

  v.  The Council had made funding available as part of the COVID-19 relief effort, which included a contribution towards the Cambridge Community Foundation Fund and the Ethnic Community Forum.

  vi.  A meeting with officers could be set up to investigate whether there was any unspent and unallocated community grant funding.

 vii.  She was aware economic hardships from COVID-19 were not over and would welcome discussions in the context of the question with cultural and faith leaders to discuss additional needs in the BAME community.

 

The following supplementary points were made:

  i.  Thanked the Executive Councillor for her words and would pass on her thanks to colleagues.

  ii.  Commented that this needed to be an educational lesson for many.  He thought it unlikely that the 138 people would have gone to food banks in the first place, although they did a fantastic job they did not have specialist food. It was generally dried food or contained a list of items which would not encourage people to go to the food bank. People who had attended the food bank had returned the food as it did not meet their dietary, cultural or religious requirements. There was a gap and un-met need which needed to be filled.

  iii.  There were a number of people not going to food banks for a variety of reasons, these were not secular and people may feel uncomfortable going to them.

  iv.  Needed to encourage people to donate more specialist food across the city.

  v.  Pleased it had been acknowledged there was a problem then something could be done about it.

  vi.  Noted that this situation would be on-going and a long-term issue.

 

Councillor Collis responded with the following:

  i.  She thought it would be useful to invite the public speaker to an online meeting of the Food Poverty Alliance. There were other faith leaders involved in the alliance and she would contact the public speaker outside of the meeting to take the matter forward.

 

2.

i.   He was a resident of East Chesterton and asked if the Executive Councillor for open spaces agreed that there are far too few green and open spaces in East Chesterton and that those we have must be maintained, supported and improved wherever possible?

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Open Spaces responded:

  i.  She cared enormously for parks and open spaces and she sought to look after protected open space and where possible preserve and extend them.

  ii.  Acknowledged that East Chesterton Ward had less open space than other wards. On average in Cambridge there was 6.2 hectares of open space per 1000 inhabitants, while East Chesterton had 2.9 hectares of open space per 1000 inhabitants, which was lower than the average and only 60% of that space was publicly accessible which put the ward below the recommended level of 2.4 hectares of space for play and sports per 1000.

 iii.  Residents would have access to open space across Cambridge but this wasn’t enough. Finding new space in wards was hard. The Council would do everything it could to support maintain and improve the land it had.

iv.  Decisions to reduce protected open space were never taken lightly.

  v.  The commitment to East Chesterton was demonstrated by the recently allocated s106 funding for Logan’s Meadow. The Council intended to register Logan’s Meadow as a nature reserve and undertake works to improve the area and expand it.

vi.  She welcomed suggestions for other things which could be done and would continue to monitor the situation in the ward.

 

The following supplementary points were made:

  i.  Can you ensure that the green space in East Chesterton, known as five trees, which is between Fen Road and Cam Causeway won’t be encroached upon by any redevelopment e.g: at the former care home at 73 Fen Road and any other development in the area which would reduce the amenity and open space.

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy an Open Spaces responded:

  i.  She wasn’t aware of any planning applications at this location and if there were any the fact that open space was less in East Chesterton than elsewhere would be a material consideration in determining any application. She would support that this area be maintained as protected open space.

20/4/CNL

To consider the recommendations of the Executive for adoption

20/4/CNLa

2019/20 Revenue and Capital Outturn, Carry Forwards and Significant Variances – Housing Revenue Account (Executive Councillor for Housing) pdf icon PDF 255 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 26 votes to 0) to:

 

Approve the carry forward requests of £6,560,000 in HRA and General Fund Housing capital budgets and associated resources from 2019/20 into 2020/21 and beyond to fund re-phased net capital spending, as detailed in Appendix D of the Officer’s report and the associated notes to the appendix.

 

20/4/CNLb

Annual Treasury Management (Outturn) Report 2019/20 (Executive Councillor for Finance & Resources) pdf icon PDF 105 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

Approve the report with the Council’s actual Prudential and Treasury Indicators for 2019/20.

 

20/4/CNLc

2019/20 General Fund Revenue and Capital Outturn, Carry Forwards and Significant Variances (Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources) pdf icon PDF 108 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 27 votes to 0) to:

 

i.  Approve carry forward requests totalling £1,070,060 revenue funding from 2019/20 to 2020/21, as detailed in Appendix C of the officer’s report.

ii.  Carry forward requests of £27,634k capital resources from 2019/20 to 2020/21 to fund rephased net capital spending, as detailed in Appendix D of the officer’s report.

iii.  To fund the overspend of two capital schemes – Lammas Land Car Parking and Barnwell Business Park remedial projects totalling £29,757 from reserves.

iv.  Transfer the Bateman Street tree replacement underspend of £17k to the Environmental Improvements programme – South.

v.  Transfer the underspend of £24k on Grafton East car park essential roof repair project to Structural Holding Repairs & Lift Refurbishment - Queen Anne project which is renamed Car Park Structural Holding Repairs.

 

 

20/4/CNLd

Interim Update to Medium Term Financial Strategy (Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources) pdf icon PDF 107 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Dalzell proposed and Councillor Matthews seconded the following amendment to the recommendations, additional text is underlined, and deleted text is struck through.

 

 

i.  Note the forecast impact of the Covid-19 crisis on the council’s finances

ii.  Approve changes to 2020/21 GF revenue and capital budgets as set out in Section 7 and Appendices 1 and 2, with the exception of the following items which would delay or remove contributions supporting the council’s priority to address the climate and biodiversity emergencies, which demand an urgent response (as set out in the officer’s report contained in the Information Pack):

 

Revenue (ref Appendix 1)

B4621

Partnership work on climate change research and projects - defer half to following year (B4621)

B4626

Providing consultancy advice on Cutting Carbon Emissions in Current Building Stock - stop project (B4626)

B4640

Climate Change communication and community engagement - defer half to following year (B4640)

B4645

Double current wildflower meadows - delay one year (B4645)

B4662

Street trees fund - delay one year and spread total budget over 4 years (duration of tree canopy project) (B4662)

 

Capital (ref Appendix 2)

 

SC724

Provision of extra electric charging points

PR017

Vehicle Replacement Programme

 

iii.  Approve the use of earmarked reserves, as set out in Section 7 and Appendix 3 (as set out in the officer’s report contained within the Information Pack)

iv.  Note the revised savings requirements identified in Section 8 of the officer’s report as contained within the Information Pack.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was lost by 14 votes to 27

 

Resolved (by 27 votes to 0) to:

 

  i.  Note the forecast impact of the Covid-19 crisis on the council’s finances.

  ii.  Approve changes to the 2020/21 GF revenue and capital budgets as set out in Section 7 and Appendices 1 and 2of the officer’s report contained in the council agenda.

  iii.  Approve the use of earmarked reserves, as set out in Section 7 and Appendix 3of the officer’s report contained in the council agenda.

  iv.  Note the revised savings requirements identified in Section 8 of the officer’s report contained in the council agenda.

 

20/5/CNL

To consider the recommendations of Committees for adoption

20/5/CNLa

Civic Affairs Committee: Joint Development Control Committee pdf icon PDF 104 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 39 votes to 0) to:

 

i.  Dissolve the JDCC pursuant to section 101 (5) Local Government Act 1972 and cease all delegations to the same with effect from 31 July 2020; and 

ii.  Establish a new joint planning committee between Cambridge City Council and South Cambridgeshire District Council (to be called the Joint Development Control Committee) with the Terms of Reference as updated in the Information Pack and to delegate functions to the joint committee and officers as set out therein, pursuant to section 101 (5) and section 102 Local Government Act 1972 with effect from 1 August 2020

iii.  Agree that any ongoing planning matters or any other continuing action relating to development covered by the terms of reference as updated in the Information Pack  which would otherwise fall to be determined by the previous Committee will, after 31 July 2020, transfer to the newly formed Joint Development Control Committee for determination

iv.  Authorise the Joint Director of Planning and Economic Development, in consultation with the Chair and Vice Chair of the Committee, to decide whether to refer any development control matters for determination by the Joint Development Control Committee where the boundary of the site concerned overlaps or is adjacent to the boundary between Cambridge City Council and South Cambridgeshire District Council

v.  Authorise the Monitoring Officer to make any consequential amendments to the Council’s constitution arising from the above decisions

vi.  Appoint 6 members (and substitutes) from Cambridge City Council and South Cambridgeshire District Council to serve upon the new Joint Development Control Committee from August 2020.

 

20/5/CNLb

Employment (Senior Officer) Committee: Estates and Facilities Restructure: Associated Exit Costs pdf icon PDF 166 KB

Minutes:

Resolved (by 39 votes to 0) to:

 

Agree the termination costs arising from redundancy in the post in the Estates and Facilities Team.

 

20/6/CNL

To deal with oral questions

Minutes:

1.  Councillor Price to the Executive Councillor for Strategy and External Partnerships

You’ve raised concerns that the Mayor has been spending most of his time during the pandemic trying to take over the GCP.  What is the latest position.

The Executive Councillor responded that the Combined Authority Mayor had fully endorsed the work of the Greater Cambridge Partnership (GCP) up until January 2020. The main local transport routes had been endorsed in the Local Transport Plan, which the Mayor had led on. Everyone wanted to see us working in partnership. He hoped to link transport routes with the Cambridgeshire Metro. He wanted fast reliable public transport linking jobs, housing and the city centre.

 

2.  Councillor Dalzell to the Executive Councillor for Transport and Community Safety

With schemes being introduced across Cambridge by the County Council to encourage walking and cycling, can the Executive Councillor confirm if there has been any progress in recruiting the long vacant role of Active Travel Officer?

The Executive Councillor responded that the Council’s Environmental Services Team were working closely with the GCP, County Council and other important partners on the Government’s ‘Build Back Better’ road map for Cambridge which included various interventions to promote active travel. In light of the pressures faced by the council, the recruitment of the Active Travel Officer was currently on hold and the function was being resourced within the existing capacity in the Streets and Open Spaces Team. COVID -19 had had an impact on commuting levels with many people working from home and the number of people using public transport had reduced.

3.  Councillor Pippas to the Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment & City Centre

Tourism is one of the three main sources of income for Cambridge. What does the executive councillor propose to do to re-start the tourist trade and protect the local jobs that rely on that trade? 

The Executive Councillor responded that the initial priority had been to support the safe reopening of the city centre, with the aim of giving visitors and residents the confidence to return and enjoy Cambridge.  To achieve this a city centre recovery task group had been set up, which included the City Council, County Council, GCP, Cambridge BID, the Police and Stagecoach to develop a recovery plan. The recovery plan had 3 main areas of interrelated activity: highway, business and visitor management this was based on the overriding principle of ‘Build Back Better’.

The city’s retail sector had successfully been opened on 14 June and the hospitality sector on the 4 July.  Measures implemented to date included the installation of temporary highway barriers to widen narrow pavements, pedestrian management signage, customer queue management stickers and window posters for businesses. A city centre stewardship plan had been implemented which involved the deployment of city centre stewards who were easily identifiable to provide a friendly face to assist with navigation. 

4.  Councillor Ashton to the Executive Councillor for Housing

Can the Executive Councillor confirm that the Council does not supply the personal data of homeless people with no recourse to public funds to the Home Office and Immigration Enforcement without their consent?

The Executive Councillor confirmed that details of immigration enforcement was not shared without consent. The question was important as around 1/6th of people who had sought the council’s help during the COVID-19 crisis were people who did not have recourse to public funds. The Council would do everything it could for people who did not have access to social security support. The Council had run a successful Ministry of Housing scheme last year which allowed people to live rent free for 6 months whilst they took steps to settle their immigration status. The Council were looking to do something similar this year.

5.  From Councillor Davey to the Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment & City Centre

How do you think the city can best encourage more people to spend time and spend more money in the city centre?

The Executive Councillor responded that the best way to attract visitors back to the city centre was to have a well run city centre which felt safe and welcoming.

The Council was now moving on to medium and long-term action to make the city centre a more attractive place for visitors. This included the increased pedestrianisation of streets and improved cycle access infrastructure.  There were currently plans being put in place for increasing the number of outdoor tables and chairs for the hospitality sector through the introduction of experimental traffic regulation orders, which may require temporarily closing roads to vehicle access, whilst still accommodating emergency access and business access for deliveries over an 18 month period. Where temporary measures were shown to be effective then the council would seek to make them permanent.

The council would also be working on a domestic marketing plan aimed at the UK market to encourage more visitors to come to Cambridge in the future.

6.  From Councillor Chadwick to the Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment and City Centre.

With the imminent introduction of compulsory face coverings in shops what is the city council doing to support shops in the city to aid compliance and ensure availability of suitable coverings?

The Executive Councillor responded that she was pleased that Central Government was responding to scientific evidence that face masks and face coverings helped to stop the spread of COVID-19. The policy was particularly valuable to shop workers as the death rate of sales assistants was 75% higher among men and 60% higher among women than in the general population. If an individual without an exemption refused to wear a face covering then a shop could refuse them entry and call the police if people refused to comply. The police had the formal enforcement powers and could issue a fine, although enforcement was a last resort.

7.  Councillor Matthews to the Executive Councillor for Communities.

The Government has been reported and quoted as seeking to abandon the proposed, widely welcomed changes to the Gender Recognition Act, and also as considering legislation that would remove existing rights for the trans community; will the Executive Councillor join me in condemning the Government’s plans, closely monitor the situation with us and respond accordingly, and agree to include the “Progress Pride” flag as part of Cambridge’s Pride celebrations to inclusively represent the BAME LGBTQ+ and trans communities?

The Executive Councillor responded that she was a vocal trans ally, the current Gender Recognition Act had significant problems and needed reform. She expressed concerns regarding rumours that current equality provisions were going to be reduced. The Council was fully committed to equality and inclusion, this included LGBTQIA+ inclusion, the diversity pledge, LGBT+ history month, support of Cambridge Pride and participation in the Safer Spaces Initiative.  With regards to the ‘Progress Pride’ flag, she would want to consult the BAME LGBTQIA+ communities to see if they wanted to include the flag as part of Cambridge’s Pride celebrations.

8.  From Councillor Collis to the Executive Councillor for Communities

What has been done to support the wellbeing of the bereavement services staff at this difficult time?

The Executive Councillor expressed her thanks to the Team at the Crematorium and Bereavement Services. The team had had to accept a new ‘business as usual’ with social distancing rules and requirements. She also thanked the senior managers for creating a supportive working environment for staff. Colleagues had access to PAM assist, which was an external support service to all employees available 24/7 and 365 days a year.  This service also provided access to clinical and depressional expertise giving them the opportunity to talk about their work concerns without having to go through their line managers if they didn’t feel able to do so.

The following oral questions were tabled but owing to the expiry of the period of time permitted, were not covered during the meeting. The Mayor asked Executive Councillors if a written response could be provided to those questions that had not been covered.

 

9.  Councillor Gehring to the Executive Councillor for Executive Councillor for Transport and Community Safety.

Does the Council think car sharing is a useful addition for our sustainable transport mix?

10.  Councillor McGerty to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Open Spaces

In light of significant delays, could the Executive Councillor provide an updated schedule for delivery of the new Nightingale Recreation Ground Pavilion?

11.  Councillor Baigent to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Open Spaces

Shortly after she was elected the executive councillor for planning policy talked about transparency and community engagement in the planning process. Can she tell us how this will be shown in the development of the new local plan, given its importance?

12.  From Councillor O’Reilly to the Executive Councillor for Communities

What is the council doing to mitigate for the cancellation of face to face live events over the summer?

13.  Councillor Bick to the Executive Councillor for Finance & Resources

Why is the City Council so dramatically underspending its apprenticeship funding? 

14.  Councillor Porrer to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Open Spaces

Could the Executive Councillor update members on whether or not the city council has now stopped using herbicides on our city verges under our contract with the county council, as discussed at the last meeting in May 2020?

15.  From Councillor McQueen to the Executive Councillor for Communities

What steps are the council taking to support those people on universal credit?

16.  From Councillor Thittala to the Executive Councillor for Communities

During the lockdown, my friends and family cooked vegetarian food, and delivered 70-80 through the mutual aid support, and response was very positive because it was vegetarian food. Could the executive councillor tell us what work is being done to ensure that the food served as part of the Covid relief and holiday lunch efforts is sensitive to cultural and dietary needs?

17.  From the Councillor Todd-Jones to the Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources

What has the council been able to do to support businesses, charities and other not for profit organisations in Cambridge who have lost income and/or incurred extra costs as a result of the Covid19 lockdown?

18.  From Councillor Payne to the Executive Councillor for Communities

The work of the mutual aid groups across the city has been of vital importance throughout the lockdown, and this has received cross-party recognition and thanks.  Although the lockdown is loosening, the impact of Covid-19 continues, and many people will still be in need of support.  Could the Executive Councillor please confirm what support the Council will offer to the mutual aid groups on a longer term basis?

19.  Councillor Bird to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Open Spaces

Thank the executive councillor for open spaces for opening playgrounds on July 4. What measures are in place to ensure that children are safe?

20.  From Councillor Hadley to the Executive Councillor for Climate Change, Environment & City Centre

At a time when we are trying to show that Cambridge is open for business but still maintain social distancing, what measures can be taken to make the city more attractive to residents and visitors?

21.  From Councillor Martinelli to the Executive Councillor for Housing

Does the Executive Councillor believe the Council has failed its tenants at the Kingsway flats in Arbury?

22.  Councillor Smart to the Executive Councillor for Strategy and External Partnerships

What are the main targets in the city’s recovery plans?

23.  From Councillor Cantrill for the Executive Councillor for Communities

The recently announced Green Homes Grant launches in September which gives eligible homeowners up to £5'000 towards energy efficiency improvements in their homes. In the light of the climate emergency, what will the city council do to promote this scheme to residents and ensure strong uptake?

24.  From Councillor Barnett to the Executive Councillor for Communities

Will Jesus Green pool be open this summer? 

 

 

 

20/7/CNL

To consider the following notices of motion, notice of which has been given by:

20/7/CNLa

Councillor Payne: Refugee Resettlement

Council notes:

·  The imminent end of the 2016 Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme and the success in surpassing the target of resettling 100 Syrian refugees, with the help of the Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and the participation of South Cambs District Council. 

·  The imminent start of the Government’s new resettlement scheme, as reaffirmed by the Home Secretary on 19th June 2020, which commits to resettling 5000 refugees in the first  year, under the same five-year funding arrangement currently provided by the Vulnerable Person’s Resettlement Scheme and the Vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme.

·  The awful experiences of an estimated 50,000 refugees trapped in camps on the Aegean islands in Greece, highlighted by the Europe Must Act campaign.

·  The creation of the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network, providing a structure for councils to work more closely together. 

·  That Cambridge benefits from committed charitable organisations supporting refugee resettlement, including Cambridge City of Sanctuary, CamCRAG, Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum.

 

Council believes:

·  Cambridge has a duty to the rest of the world, and should remain committed to being a city of sanctuary. 

·  That partnership is the best way to expedite the refugee resettlement process and find the best outcomes. 

·  That the covid-19 pandemic should accelerate all efforts to resettle refugees given the health risks presented by the refugee camps. 

 

Council will:

·  Renew its commitment to Cambridge being a City of Sanctuary.

·  Enshrine the City of Sanctuary aims in the corporate plan and begin a periodic report to committee about progress with resettlement.

·  Commit to resettling 150 refugees under the UKRS by 2025. 

·  Write to the County Council and South and East Cambridgeshire District Councils, to request support and unequivocal partnership in this.

·  Establish a multi-agency forum to enable interchange between the councils involved in resettlement and third sector and organisations. 

·  Review the 2016 resettlement scheme and prepare a report to go to the Environment and Community Scrutiny Committee within the next year, to identify the learning achieved. 

·  Apply to join the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network.

·  Update the council website to clarify the resettlement situation, and provide updated details of ways to help. 

 

Minutes:

Councillor Payne proposed and Councillor Chadwick seconded the following motion:

 

Council notes:

·  The imminent end of the 2016 Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme and the success in surpassing the target of resettling 100 Syrian refugees, with the help of the Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and the participation of South Cambs District Council. 

·  The imminent start of the Government’s new resettlement scheme, as reaffirmed by the Home Secretary on 19th June 2020, which commits to resettling 5000 refugees in the first  year, under the same five-year funding arrangement currently provided by the Vulnerable Person’s Resettlement Scheme and the Vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme.

·  The awful experiences of an estimated 50,000 refugees trapped in camps on the Aegean islands in Greece, highlighted by the Europe Must Act campaign.

·  The creation of the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network, providing a structure for councils to work more closely together. 

·  That Cambridge benefits from committed charitable organisations supporting refugee resettlement, including Cambridge City of Sanctuary, CamCRAG, Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum.

 

Council believes:

·  Cambridge has a duty to the rest of the world, and should remain committed to being a city of sanctuary. 

·  That partnership is the best way to expedite the refugee resettlement process and find the best outcomes. 

·  That the covid-19 pandemic should accelerate all efforts to resettle refugees given the health risks presented by the refugee camps. 

 

Council will:

·  Renew its commitment to Cambridge being a City of Sanctuary.

·  Enshrine the City of Sanctuary aims in the corporate plan and begin a periodic report to committee about progress with resettlement.

·  Commit to resettling 150 refugees under the UKRS by 2025. 

·  Write to the County Council and South and East Cambridgeshire District Councils, to request support and unequivocal partnership in this.

·  Establish a multi-agency forum to enable interchange between the councils involved in resettlement and third sector and organisations. 

·  Review the 2016 resettlement scheme and prepare a report to go to the Environment and Community Scrutiny Committee within the next year, to identify the learning achieved. 

·  Apply to join the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network.

·  Update the council website to clarify the resettlement situation, and provide updated details of ways to help. 

 

On a show of hands Council agreed by a simple majority to suspend Council Procedure Rules 23.3 to permit amendments to be moved where no, or inadequate notice had been given.

 

Councillor Massey proposed and Councillor Bird seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struck through and additional text underlined):

 

Council notes:

·  The success of Cambridge city council’s Syrian Vulnerable persons Resettlement scheme which has exceeded its target of resettling 100 persons, having to date resettled 121 Syrian refugees with the help of its partners Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and South Cambridgeshire District Council.  Cambridge City Council has been cited many times by the Home Office as a best practice approach to the resettlement.

·  The imminent end of the 2016 Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme and the success in surpassing the target of resettling 100 Syrian refugees, with the help of the Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and the participation of South Cambs District Council. 

·  The imminent start of the Government’s new resettlement scheme, as reaffirmed by the Home Secretary on 19th June 2020, which commits to resettling 5000 refugees in the first  year, under the same five-year funding arrangement currently provided by the Vulnerable Person’s Resettlement Scheme and the Vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme.

·  The awful experiences of an estimated 50,000 refugees trapped in camps on the Aegean islands in Greece, highlighted by the Europe Must Act campaign.

·  The creation of the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network, providing a structure for councils to work more closely together. 

·  That Cambridge is City of Sanctuary, and that the City Council is a signatory to this.

·  That Cambridge benefits from committed charitable and community organisations supporting refugee resettlement, including Cambridge City of Sanctuary, Cambridge Convoy Refugee Action Group CamCRAG, Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum.

 

Council believes:

·  Cambridge has a duty to the rest of the world, and should remain committed to being a city of sanctuary. 

·  Cambridge is a proudly international city, with a rightly strong sense of responsibility to the rest of the world, and should remain committed to being a city of sanctuary.

·  That p Partnership is the best way to expedite the refugee resettlement process and find the best outcomes. 

·  That t The covid-19 pandemic should accelerate all efforts to resettle refugees given the health risks presented by the refugee camps. 

 

Council will:

·  Renew its commitment to Cambridge being a City of Sanctuary.

·  Reaffirm its commitment to Cambridge being a City of Sanctuary including exploring greater ties with the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network, including becoming a local authority partner.

·  Enshrine the City of Sanctuary aims in the corporate plan and begin a periodic report to committee about progress with resettlement.

·  Commit to resettling 150 refugees under the UKRS by 2025. 

·  Continue to report to the Environment and Communities Committee about progress with resettlement.

·  Commits to being bold and ambitious in extending our work in this area, resettling as many refuges and other asylum seekers as it is able to do so effectively.

·  Develop its plan in conjunction with our existing multi-agency partners, including Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum, The Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and South Cambridgeshire District Council.

·  Write to the County Council and South and East Cambridgeshire District Councils, to request support and unequivocal partnership in this region, as we will be able to achieve so much more if all local authorities work together.

·  Establish a multi-agency forum to enable interchange between the councils involved in resettlement and third sector and organisations. 

·  Review the 2016 resettlement scheme and prepare a report to go to the Environment and Community Scrutiny Committee within the next year, to identify the learning achieved. 

·  Apply to join the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network.

·  Update the council website to clarify the resettlement situation, and provide updated details of ways to help. 

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 25 votes to 12.

 

Resolved (by 37 votes to 0) that:

 

Council notes:

·  The success of Cambridge city council’s Syrian Vulnerable persons Resettlement scheme which has exceeded its target of resettling 100 persons, having to date resettled 121 Syrian refugees with the help of its partners Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and South Cambridgeshire District Council.  Cambridge City Council has been cited many times by the Home Office as a best practice approach to the resettlement.

·  The imminent start of the Government’s new resettlement scheme, as reaffirmed by the Home Secretary on 19th June 2020, which commits to resettling 5000 refugees in the first  year, under the same five-year funding arrangement currently provided by the Vulnerable Person’s Resettlement Scheme and the Vulnerable Children’s Resettlement Scheme.

·  The awful experiences of an estimated 50,000 refugees trapped in camps on the Aegean islands in Greece, highlighted by the Europe Must Act campaign.

·  That Cambridge is City of Sanctuary, and that the City Council is a signatory to this.

·  That Cambridge benefits from committed charitable and community organisations supporting refugee resettlement, including Cambridge City of Sanctuary, Cambridge Convoy Refugee Action Group CamCRAG, Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum.

 

Council believes:

·  Cambridge is a proudly international city, with a rightly strong sense of responsibility to the rest of the world, and should remain committed to being a city of sanctuary.

·  Partnership is the best way to expedite the refugee resettlement process and find the best outcomes. 

·  The covid-19 pandemic should accelerate all efforts to resettle refugees given the health risks presented by the refugee camps. 

 

Council will:

·  Reaffirm its commitment to Cambridge being a City of Sanctuary including exploring greater ties with the City of Sanctuary Local Authority Network, including becoming a local authority partner.

·  Continue to report to the Environment and Communities Committee about progress with resettlement.

·  Commits to being bold and ambitious in extending our work in this area, resettling as many refuges and other asylum seekers as it is able to do so effectively.

·  Develop its plan in conjunction with our existing multi-agency partners, including Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum, The Cambridge Refugee Resettlement Campaign and South Cambridgeshire District Council.

·  Write to the County Council and East Cambridgeshire District Councils, to request support and unequivocal partnership in this region, as we will be able to achieve so much more if all local authorities work together.

·  Update the council website to clarify the resettlement situation, and provide updated details of ways to help.

20/7/CNLb

Councillor Matthews: Littering in Public Places

Council notes that despite the best efforts of council staff under existing arrangements, public places in the city are suffering an inundation of litter coinciding with the Covid pandemic.

 

It welcomes the demonstrated importance of our open spaces for people to relax and enjoy themselves over this period but regrets that the contract of trust is not working between the city and some users over their care. 

 

Council calls for an urgent, co-ordinated local response campaign.

 

It believes this should embrace a combination of high profile public awareness, enhanced and focused enforcement activity, an intensification of collection frequency in response to warm weather days and improved type and capacity of bins in places of high footfall and concentrated leisure activity across the city. 

 

It requests the relevant Executive Councillor to rapidly bring together a small cross-party group of members to sense-check plans from council officers, enlisting support from other agencies including the Police and from the volunteer sector.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Matthews proposed and Councillor Tunnacliffe seconded the following motion:

 

Council notes that despite the best efforts of council staff under existing arrangements, public places in the city are suffering an inundation of litter coinciding with the Covid pandemic.

 

It welcomes the demonstrated importance of our open spaces for people to relax and enjoy themselves over this period but regrets that the contract of trust is not working between the city and some users over their care. 

 

Council calls for an urgent, co-ordinated local response campaign.

 

It believes this should embrace a combination of high profile public awareness, enhanced and focused enforcement activity, an intensification of collection frequency in response to warm weather days and improved type and capacity of bins in places of high footfall and concentrated leisure activity across the city. 

 

It requests the relevant Executive Councillor to rapidly bring together a small cross-party group of members to sense-check plans from council officers, enlisting support from other agencies including the Police and from the volunteer sector.

 

On a show of hands Council agreed to suspend Council Procedure Rules 23.3 (unanimously) to permit amendments to be moved where no, or inadequate notice had been given.

 

Councillor Moore proposed and Councillor Price seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struck through and additional text underlined):

 

Council notes; that despite the best efforts of council staff under existing arrangements, public places in the city are suffering an inundation of litter coinciding with the Covid pandemic.

 

It welcomes

·  the demonstrated importance of our open spaces for people to relax and enjoy themselves over this period but regrets that the contract of trust is not working between the city and some users over their care.  Council calls for an urgent, co-ordinated local response campaign.

 

It believes this should embrace a combination of:

 

·  High profile public awareness,

·  Enhanced and focused enforcement activity,

·  An intensification of collection frequency in response to warm weather days; and

·  Improved type and capacity of bins in places of high footfall and concentrated leisure activity across the city. 

 

It requests the relevant Executive Councillor to rapidly bring together a small cross-party group of members to sense-check plans from council officers, enlisting support from other agencies including the Police and from the volunteer sector.”

 

·  That our streets and Open Spaces team have been working throughout lockdown keeping Cambridge clean and safe.

·  That during lockdown our operatives updated their work schedule to focus their efforts on busier residential areas and open spaces whilst the city centre was very quiet.

·  That our Streets and Open Spaces team work seven days a week starting at 6am to clean up the city before residents go out to school and work.

·  That our enforcement teams have been working throughout lockdown supporting Environmental Health and the Police to manage lockdown restrictions using the policy of engage, explain, encourage, enforce.

·  The increase in litter related to Covid-19 such as face masks and disposable gloves, which defeats the purpose of wearing them and also poses a health risk to our staff and residents.

·  Since lockdown restrictions have been eased, open spaces and beauty spots across England, including many beaches, have seen a disappointing increase in litter. In Cambridge this has been seen on Jesus Green, Parkers Piece, Midsummer Common and around Mill Pond. 

·  That in preparation for this increase in litter, additional large bins with new signage, including information on anti-littering and social distancing were put at the entrances to key sites. These have been supplemented with an additional number of wheeled bins at locations experiencing above normal volumes of littering.

·  The damage caused to green spaces, including moorland and forest fires by irresponsible use of disposable barbeques.

·  The harm caused to wildlife, pets and farm animals by litter, as seen by the death of a cow on Grantchester Meadows in South Cambridgeshire caused by a discarded plastic bag.

 

This council;

·  Will be taking part in the Keep Britain Tidy Great British September Clean to replace the Great British Spring clean which had to be cancelled due to Covid-19.

·  Will be carrying out a planned review of our litter bins which has been delayed due to the pandemic but will be reported back this coming autumn/winter.

·  Will be taking part in the Keep Britain Tidy - Love Parks Week, which this year is going to be a new summer-long campaign to reduce anti-social behaviour in parks, based on research and behavioural insights.

·  Is planning a new anti-littering campaign.

·  Is seeking to engage with local retail and hospitality businesses where we have evidence of a link between the litter and their business activity.

·  Is continuing to recruit community volunteers to help improve our streets and open spaces, including by litter picking.

·  Will be trialling a small refuse vehicle to use on our parks and open spaces which will increase the type and size of bin we will be able to use.

·  Is defining new targets to achieve a reduction in the amount of waste generated, by supporting and educating residents to reduce, reuse and recycle more.

 

#Don’tTrashCambridge #Don’tBeATosser

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 25 votes to 11.

 

Resolved (by 36 votes to 0) that:

 

Council notes;

·  the demonstrated importance of our open spaces for people to relax and enjoy themselves over this period

·  That our streets and Open Spaces team have been working throughout lockdown keeping Cambridge clean and safe.

·  That during lockdown our operatives updated their work schedule to focus their efforts on busier residential areas and open spaces whilst the city centre was very quiet.

·  That our Streets and Open Spaces team work seven days a week starting at 6am to clean up the city before residents go out to school and work.

·  That our enforcement teams have been working throughout lockdown supporting Environmental Health and the Police to manage lockdown restrictions using the policy of engage, explain, encourage, enforce.

·  The increase in litter related to Covid-19 such as face masks and disposable gloves, which defeats the purpose of wearing them and also poses a health risk to our staff and residents.

·  Since lockdown restrictions have been eased, open spaces and beauty spots across England, including many beaches, have seen a disappointing increase in litter. In Cambridge this has been seen on Jesus Green, Parkers Piece, Midsummer Common and around Mill Pond. 

·  That in preparation for this increase in litter, additional large bins with new signage, including information on anti-littering and social distancing were put at the entrances to key sites. These have been supplemented with an additional number of wheeled bins at locations experiencing above normal volumes of littering.

·  The damage caused to green spaces, including moorland and forest fires by irresponsible use of disposable barbeques.

·  The harm caused to wildlife, pets and farm animals by litter, as seen by the death of a cow on Grantchester Meadows in South Cambridgeshire caused by a discarded plastic bag.

 

This council;

·  Will be taking part in the Keep Britain Tidy Great British September Clean to replace the Great British Spring clean which had to be cancelled due to Covid-19.

·  Will be carrying out a planned review of our litter bins which has been delayed due to the pandemic but will be reported back this coming autumn/winter.

·  Will be taking part in the Keep Britain Tidy - Love Parks Week, which this year is going to be a new summer-long campaign to reduce anti-social behaviour in parks, based on research and behavioural insights.

·  Is planning a new anti-littering campaign.

·  Is seeking to engage with local retail and hospitality businesses where we have evidence of a link between the litter and their business activity.

·  Is continuing to recruit community volunteers to help improve our streets and open spaces, including by litter picking.

·  Will be trialling a small refuse vehicle to use on our parks and open spaces which will increase the type and size of bin we will be able to use.

·  Is defining new targets to achieve a reduction in the amount of waste generated, by supporting and educating residents to reduce, reuse and recycle more.

 

#Don’tTrashCambridge #Don’tBeATosser

 

20/7/CNLc

Councillor Porrer: Black Lives Matter

Council notes:

1.  The Home Office report in December 2018 identified that 26% of instances of police using firearms in the UK are against black people, despite black people making up only 3.3% of the population. 51% of young men in custody in the UK are from black, Asian or minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, despite these groups making up only 14% of the UK population.

2.  The 2017 Lammy Report, which concluded that “BAME individuals still face bias, including overt discrimination, in parts of the justice system”.

3.  Research by Liberty Investigates, which found that BAME people are 54% are more likely than white people to be fined under the new coronavirus lockdown laws.

4.  Data from Stop Watch, which shows that in 2018/2019 Cambridgeshire Police subjected black people to stop and search at a rate 6 times higher than white people. 

5.  That the worldwide protests in response to the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis have fuelled a movement to end Police violence against black people everywhere

 

Cambridge City Council expresses its solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and believes:

 

A. Racism in all forms, both structural and individual, continues to be a serious problem throughout the UK, including in Cambridge.

B. Although progress has been made in combatting racism, much more work is needed to eradicate it entirely.

C. This Council welcomes our duty as a public leader to actively spearhead that work locally.

 

Council resolves to meet the challenge head on with immediate action to:

 

·  Request from the Director of Public Health a report on the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on BAME communities in Cambridge by the end of 2020, to be reviewed in the Environment and Community scrutiny committee, and shared with BAME community representatives.

·  Ask our Equalities panel and HR team to review and re-challenge the Council about the experience of ethnic minority staff and service users. This should include but be not limited to working with our BAME staff to set up and support a BAME staff forum to review and act on concerns.

·  Require all Councillors to attend a briefing on Equality and Diversity during the first year of their term, to better understand their duties relating to the Public Sector Equality Duty, Equality Impact assessments and also be updated on key areas the Council is currently working on.

·  Work with the City’s food banks to ensure that they can provide as broad a range of foods as possible to cater for the dietary and cultural requirements of the ethnic minority groups in Cambridge, by the end of the next 3 months.

·  Work with partners across the city including the County Council and Combined Authority to  produce a toolkit for businesses to help broaden their understanding of race inequality in the workplace, including but not limited to materials, signposts to relevant local groups and training that can be provided for staff, and links to relevant networks.

·  Ask the Police & Crime Commissioner to report to the Police and Crime panel on  ...  view the full agenda text for item 20/7/CNLc

Minutes:

The movers and seconders of motions 7c and 7d sought Council’s approval to withdraw these motions under Council Procedure Rule 27. 

 

A composite joint motion to replace motions 7c and 7d and set out in the Information Pack was proposed by Councillor Thittala and seconded by Councillor Porrer.

 

Council notes:

 

1. On May 25th 2020 George Floyd was killed by a Policeman in Minneapolis. His death provoked widespread protests under the ‘Black lives Matter’ movement across the world, fuelling a desire to tackle systemic racism, including peaceful demonstrations in Cambridge.

 

2.  The Home Office report in December 2018 identified that 26% of instances of police using firearms in the UK are against black people, despite black people making up only 3.3% of the population. 51% of young men in custody in the UK are from black, Asian or minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, despite these groups making up only 14% of the UK population.

 

3.  The 2017 Lammy Report, which concluded that “BAME individuals still face bias, including overt discrimination, in parts of the justice system”.

 

4.  Data from Stop Watch, which shows that in 2018/2019 Cambridgeshire Police subjected black people to stop and search at a rate 6 times higher than white people.

 

 

Cambridge City Council expresses its solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and believes:

 

A. Racism in all forms, both structural and individual, continues to be a serious problem throughout the UK, including in Cambridge.

 

B. Although progress has been made in combatting racism, much more work is needed to eradicate it entirely.

 

C. This Council welcomes our duty as a public leader to actively spearhead that work locally.

 

 

Council resolves to meet the challenge head on with immediate action to:

 

Request from the Director of Public Health a report on the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on BAME communities in Cambridge by the end of 2020, to be reviewed in the Environment and Community scrutiny committee, and shared with BAME community representatives.

 

Request that the Leader of the Council will write to the Prime Minster and seek written confirmation of the measures which are being put in place nationally to ensure that the BAME community are not disproportionately affected as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic

 

Whilst noting the progress made previously, requests that the City Council reviews the Single Equality Scheme, prior to a reaffirmation of the scheme with particular and specific reference to the employment, recruitment and retention of staff with particular emphasis on enhancing consultation and representation of BAME staff.

 

Require all Councillors to attend a briefing on Equality and Diversity during the first year of their term, to better understand their duties relating to the Public Sector Equality Duty, Equality Impact assessments and also to be updated on key areas that the Council is currently working on.

 

Work with partners across the city including the County Council and Combined Authority to  produce a toolkit for businesses to help broaden their understanding of race inequality in the workplace, including but not limited to materials, signposts to relevant local groups and training that can be provided for staff, and links to relevant networks.

 

Ask the Police & Crime Commissioner to report to the Police and Crime panel on the measures which have been put in place to eliminate the disproportionality of BAME people affected by the use of stop and search powers seen locally and nationally and how often are these measures are reviewed; and to provide a regular report as to initiatives and progress.

 

Whilst recognising the established dialogue between existing local BAME community groups such as the Cambridge Ethnic Community Forum, for the City Council, and other local public service organisations to review their own involvement, and to encourage enhanced comment and feedback on further areas for improvement within our control. This work to be initiated by the end of September 2020 with a report to the relevant Committees by May 2021.

 

Welcome the work already being undertaken by our partners in the Cambridge Food Poverty Alliance to ensure that the food provided meets the needs of all those using the food hubs or receiving meals, including those with specific religious, health or cultural requirements, and note that this prioritises talking to the recipients themselves about their needs. In addition, council commits to exploring ways in which this commitment can be advertised amongst all communities in the City, to ensure that they know they can request food confidently knowing it will meet their needs.

 

Resolved (by 36 votes to 0) to support the motion.

 

 

20/7/CNLd

Councillor Collis: Free School Meals

Council notes that the lockdown period between March and May 2020 saw an unprecedented 142% increase in the number of Cambridge residents claiming unemployment benefits. Council also notes the subsequent rise in the number of Cambridge families falling into food poverty over the same period, with an additional 199 children claiming Free School Meals Vouchers (compared with a total increase of 514 new claims between May 2019 and May 2020).

 

Council notes the well-documented problems with the Free School Meals voucher scheme system and welcomes the intervention of our local MPs on behalf of schools, parents and their children. 

 

Council also welcomes the national campaign led by Manchester United and England footballer Marcus Rashford, whose eloquence in using his own personal experience of food poverty as a child to persuade the government to make a U-turn on its proposal to stop issuing Free School Meals vouchers over the summer holidays.

 

Council notes with thanks the responsiveness of both council officers and partners in the Food Poverty Alliance, who have worked together to address this rise in food poverty by;

 

-  supporting ward based mutual aid groups to identify residents needing help

-  establishing eight community food hubs across the city

-  adapting the holiday lunches provision into a service providing delivery of meals and shopping bags to vulnerable families

 

This directly meets several of the five main aims in the FPA’s action plan, endorsed by council in October 2019 particularly (2) ensuring there is emergency support so that people in Cambridge do not go hungry and promoting and (3) supporting community responses to food poverty.

 

Council also notes with thanks the work of the volunteers who have put in hundreds of hours during the COVID-19 outbreak to support residents, both at the community food hubs and those who have cooked, packed and delivered thousands of meals across the city.

 

Cambridge City Council therefore resolves to;

 

-  continue to work with officers and the FPA to monitor the extent of food poverty and support needs of the community

-  monitor the government’s new COVID Summer Food Fund and any issues for local families

-  continue to work with the FPA to identify, as we emerge into the recovery period, long-term, sustainable solutions to food poverty

 

Minutes:

Councillor Collis proposed and Councillor Davies seconded the following motion:

 

Council notes that the lockdown period between March and May 2020 saw an unprecedented 142% increase in the number of Cambridge residents claiming unemployment benefits. Council also notes the subsequent rise in the number of Cambridge families falling into food poverty over the same period, with an additional 199 children claiming Free School Meals Vouchers (compared with a total increase of 514 new claims between May 2019 and May 2020).

 

Council notes the well-documented problems with the Free School Meals voucher scheme system and welcomes the intervention of our local MPs on behalf of schools, parents and their children. 

 

Council also welcomes the national campaign led by Manchester United and England footballer Marcus Rashford, whose eloquence in using his own personal experience of food poverty as a child to persuade the government to make a U-turn on its proposal to stop issuing Free School Meals vouchers over the summer holidays.

 

Council notes with thanks the responsiveness of both council officers and partners in the Food Poverty Alliance, who have worked together to address this rise in food poverty by;

 

-  supporting ward based mutual aid groups to identify residents needing help

-  establishing eight community food hubs across the city

-  adapting the holiday lunches provision into a service providing delivery of meals and shopping bags to vulnerable families

 

This directly meets several of the five main aims in the FPA’s action plan, endorsed by council in October 2019 particularly (2) ensuring there is emergency support so that people in Cambridge do not go hungry and promoting and (3) supporting community responses to food poverty.

 

Council also notes with thanks the work of the volunteers who have put in hundreds of hours during the COVID-19 outbreak to support residents, both at the community food hubs and those who have cooked, packed and delivered thousands of meals across the city.

 

Cambridge City Council therefore resolves to;

 

-  continue to work with officers and the FPA to monitor the extent of food poverty and support needs of the community

-  monitor the government’s new COVID Summer Food Fund and any issues for local families

-  continue to work with the FPA to identify, as we emerge into the recovery period, long-term, sustainable solutions to food poverty

 

Resolved (by 36 votes to 0) to support the motion.

 

 

20/8/CNL

Written questions

No discussion will take place on this item. Members will be asked to note the written questions and answers document as circulated around the Chamber.

 

Minutes:

Members were asked to note the written questions and answers that had been placed in the information pack and published on the council meeting webpage.