A Cambridge City Council website

Cambridge City Council

Council and democracy

Home > Council and Democracy > Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, The Guildhall, Market Square, Cambridge, CB2 3QJ

Contact: Democratic Services  Committee Manager

Link: Video recording of the meeting

Items
No. Item

19/14/CNL

Public questions time

Minutes:

A member of the public asked a question as set out below.

 

1.  She was a Biologist at Nottingham University and her husband was a Professor. His work studied snails in the south pacific and it was found that some snail species had become extinct. To try and protect certain snail species a further snail was introduced to manage certain populations of snails in the area.  Unfortunately the snail which was introduced consumed snail species it was not expected to consume.  They set up a charity called Frozen Ark, whose purpose was to save genetic resources before they went extinct.  The charity was a global charity and there were 24 institutions which were collecting DNA samples so that this could be used for breeding and future genetic studies. She noted the Motion on Biodiversity and asked whether the Council would be interested in getting involved with the Frozen Ark project.

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Open Spaces responded:

 

  i.  Thanked the public speaker for attending the meeting and bringing the Frozen Ark project to the council’s attention. She commented that it was important that we had records of all the different species so that we can work to reduce their decline. The Council was fortunate to be able to contact such organisations for contributions.

 

 

19/15/CNL

To consider the following notices of motion, notice of which has been given by:

19/15/CNLa

Councillor Martinelli: Proposed closure of Parkside Police station

Council notes the Police Constabulary’s intention to move its Southern Divisional HQ out of its current site in Parkside to a location in the outskirts of Cambridge.

 

It resolves to hold the Police & Crime Commissioner to his public statement that community policing and a Public Contact point will remain in the the city centre. In particular the council calls on:

1. The Commissioner and the Chief Constable for the proposed city centre public contact point to take the form of a desk staffed 24/7, recognising the very high footfall in Cambridge city centre, the size of the night economy, and the high concentration of incidents to be found in any vibrant urban centre;

 

2. The City Council Chief Executive to explore and if possible advance the opportunity for the Police Neighbourhood Policing team to share an office facility within the city with the city council’s Safer Communities team and potentially other enforcement officers of the city and county council, a model which has been pioneered in Peterborough, in order to further enhance joint working.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Martinelli proposed and Councillor Dalzell seconded the following motion:

 

Council notes the Police Constabulary’s intention to move its Southern Divisional HQ out of its current site in Parkside to a location in the outskirts of Cambridge.

 

It resolves to hold the Police & Crime Commissioner to his public statement that community policing and a Public Contact point will remain in the the city centre. In particular the council calls on:

1. The Commissioner and the Chief Constable for the proposed city centre public contact point to take the form of a desk staffed 24/7, recognising the very high footfall in Cambridge city centre, the size of the night economy, and the high concentration of incidents to be found in any vibrant urban centre;

 

2. The City Council Chief Executive to explore and if possible advance the opportunity for the Police Neighbourhood Policing team to share an office facility within the city with the city council’s Safer Communities team and potentially other enforcement officers of the city and county council, a model which has been pioneered in Peterborough, in order to further enhance joint working.

 

Councillor Massey proposed and Councillor Davies seconded the following amendment to motion (additional text underlined and deleted text struck through)

 

Council notes the Police Constabulary’s intention to move its Southern Divisional HQ out of its current site in Parkside to a location in the outskirts of Cambridge.

 

It resolves to hold the Police & Crime Commissioner to his public statement that community policing and a Public Contact point will remain in the the city centre. In particularThe council calls on:

1. The Police and Crime Commissioner and the Chief Constable to retain a smaller city centre police station with parking for patrol cars, particularly for our neighbourhood policing officers to work from and to be able to walk and cycle from the station and with  for the proposed city centre public contact point to take the form of a desk staffed 24/7, recognising the very high footfall in Cambridge city centre, the high levels of tourism in our city the size of the night economy, and the high concentration of incidents to be found in any vibrant urban centre;

 

2. The City Council Chief Executive to explore and if possible advance the opportunity for the Police Neighbourhood Policing team to share an office facility within the city with the city council’s Safer Communities team and potentially other enforcement officers of the city and county council, a model which has been pioneered in Peterborough, in order to further enhance joint working.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 22 votes to 11.

 

Resolved (by 33 votes to 0):

 

Council notes the Police Constabulary’s intention to move its Southern Divisional HQ out of its current site in Parkside to a location in the outskirts of Cambridge.

 

The council calls on:

The Police and Crime Commissioner and the Chief Constable to retain a smaller city centre police station with parking for patrol cars, particularly for our neighbourhood policing officers to work from and to be able to walk and cycle from the station and with a desk staffed 24/7, recognising the very high footfall in Cambridge city centre, the high levels of tourism in our city the size of the night economy, and the high concentration of incidents to be found in any vibrant urban centre.

 

 

 

 

 

 

19/15/CNLb

Councillor Cantrill: People's vote motion

In the 2016 Referendum on the European Union Cambridge voted over 73% in favour of remaining in the European Union.  The European elections on the 23 May, provides residents with an opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to remaining in the European Union.

The Council believes that the interests of its residents would be best protected by a People’s Vote on Brexit with the option of revoking Article 50 and remaining in the EU.

The Council calls on all political parties to commit to give Cambridge residents (including resident European citizens) a vote on whether to accept whatever Brexit deal is agreed or to retain the many benefits local residents currently enjoy by staying in the European Union.

The Council should write to our two local MPs calling on them to lobby their parties to unequivocally support a People’s Vote.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Cantrill requested the Council’s consent under Council Procedure Rule 26 to alter his motion. On a show of hands the request was lost (by 11 in favour to 22 against).

 

Councillor Cantrill proposed and Councillor Gehring seconded the following motion:

In the 2016 Referendum on the European Union Cambridge voted over 73% in favour of remaining in the European Union.  The European elections on the 23 May, provides residents with an opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to remaining in the European Union.

The Council believes that the interests of its residents would be best protected by a People’s Vote on Brexit with the option of revoking Article 50 and remaining in the EU.

The Council calls on all political parties to commit to give Cambridge residents (including resident European citizens) a vote on whether to accept whatever Brexit deal is agreed or to retain the many benefits local residents currently enjoy by staying in the European Union.

The Council should write to our two local MPs calling on them to lobby their parties to unequivocally support a People’s Vote.

Councillor Smith proposed and Councillor Moore seconded an amendment to the motion (additional text underlined and deleted text struck through)

In the 2016 Referendum on the European Union Cambridge voted over 73% in favour of remaining in the European Union.  The European elections on the 23 May, provides residents with an opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to remaining in the European Union.

The Council believes that the interests of its residents would be best protected by a People’s Vote  Confirmatory Public Vote on any Brexit deal agreed, with the option of revoking Article 50 and remaining in the EU.

The Council calls on all political parties Parliament to commit to give Cambridge, and all UK residents (including resident European citizens) a vote on whether to accept whatever Brexit deal is agreed or to retain the many benefits local residents currently enjoy by staying in the European Union.

The Council should write to our two local MPs calling on them to lobby their parties to unequivocally support a People’s Vote thanking them for their consistent support in campaigning for a confirmatory ballot.

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 22 votes to 11.

Resolved (by 33 votes to 0, with Councillor Hipkin recorded as abstaining):

The Council believes that the interests of its residents would be best protected by a Confirmatory Public Vote on any Brexit deal agreed, with the option of revoking Article 50 and remaining in the EU.

The Council calls on Parliament to commit to give Cambridge, and all UK residents (including resident European citizens) a vote on whether to accept whatever Brexit deal is agreed or to retain the many benefits local residents currently enjoy by staying in the European Union.

The Council should write to our two local MPs thanking them for their consistent support in campaigning for a confirmatory ballot.

 

 

19/15/CNLc

Councillor Thornburrow: Declaration of a biodiversity emergency

This Council notes with concern recent reports from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) on global species and habitat loss, and also that  Cambridgeshire & Peterborough combined has one of the lowest percentages of land cover of priority habitats, natural green spaces and designated nature conservation sites in England, with only 6.5% of the land surface having statutory or non-statutory nature conservation designations and only approximately 8.5% being priority habitat.

 

We recognise the importance of a healthy and biodiverse environment that ensures our City’s future prosperity and supports the wellbeing of all who live, work and study here.

 

We therefore pledge to provide leadership and to ensure that we work with partners and our communities to reverse the decline in biodiversity and deliver measurable biodiversity net gain within Cambridge and the wider region.

 

Further to this, Council:

 

(1)  Declares its recognition of the global biodiversity emergency and the local impact this could have on the communities and businesses we serve

(2)  Pledges to act during the first year of Motion being accepted, to work towards future measurable biodiversity net gain for Cambridge, based on a full assessment of the scientific evidence on how best to achieve this

(3)  Pledges to develop plans for further action, in second year of Motion and beyond, to secure further biodiversity net gain.

 

In recognition of this biodiversity emergency, during first year of Motion being accepted Cambridge City Council will:

 

·  Make the Council estate more hospitable to a wide range of plants and animals, including on our parks and open spaces.

·  Publish a Parks Biodiversity Toolkit to encourage community engagement with habitat creation such as flowering meadows for pollinating insects.

·  Identify how the City’s open spaces function as part of a Cambridgeshire coherent ecological network and prioritise areas for protection and enhancement.

·  Set measurable targets and standards for biodiversity increase, seeking to increase community engagement with habitat creation such as bee banks and ponds.

·  Work to improve the City Council Nature Conservation Strategy, building on the significant work already delivered since its adoption in 2006, by embedding measurable biodiversity net gain across the authority.

·  Work in partnership with institutions, schools, businesses and community groups, to raise awareness and encourage wider biodiversity action across the City by:

o  Providing a range of public engagement and awareness campaigns to provide advice to residents and businesses on how to protect and enhance habitats within their neighbourhoods.

o  Promoting the adoption of the Local Nature Partnership ‘Developing with Nature Toolkit’ within all new major developments to ensure biodiversity best practice is implemented and recognised

o  Continuing to safeguard and enhance the trees of our urban forest to maximise their biodiversity benefits through the implementation of the adopted Tree Strategy (2016)

o  Encouraging and supporting urban agriculture as set out in the City Council Sustainable Food Policy,

o  Continuing to support the Local Wildlife Trust through a service level agreement (SLA) to ensure our designated Local Wildlife Sites reach and retain favourable conservation status

o  Continuing to  ...  view the full agenda text for item 19/15/CNLc

Minutes:

Councillor Thornburrow proposed and Councillor Moore seconded the following motion:

 

This Council notes with concern recent reports from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) on global species and habitat loss, and also that  Cambridgeshire & Peterborough combined has one of the lowest percentages of land cover of priority habitats, natural green spaces and designated nature conservation sites in England, with only 6.5% of the land surface having statutory or non-statutory nature conservation designations and only approximately 8.5% being priority habitat.

 

We recognise the importance of a healthy and biodiverse environment that ensures our City’s future prosperity and supports the wellbeing of all who live, work and study here.

 

We therefore pledge to provide leadership and to ensure that we work with partners and our communities to reverse the decline in biodiversity and deliver measurable biodiversity net gain within Cambridge and the wider region.

 

Further to this, Council:

 

(1)  Declares its recognition of the global biodiversity emergency and the local impact this could have on the communities and businesses we serve

(2)  Pledges to act during the first year of Motion being accepted, to work towards future measurable biodiversity net gain for Cambridge, based on a full assessment of the scientific evidence on how best to achieve this

(3)  Pledges to develop plans for further action, in second year of Motion and beyond, to secure further biodiversity net gain.

 

In recognition of this biodiversity emergency, during first year of Motion being accepted Cambridge City Council will:

 

·  Make the Council estate more hospitable to a wide range of plants and animals, including on our parks and open spaces.

·  Publish a Parks Biodiversity Toolkit to encourage community engagement with habitat creation such as flowering meadows for pollinating insects.

·  Identify how the City’s open spaces function as part of a Cambridgeshire coherent ecological network and prioritise areas for protection and enhancement.

·  Set measurable targets and standards for biodiversity increase, seeking to increase community engagement with habitat creation such as bee banks and ponds.

·  Work to improve the City Council Nature Conservation Strategy, building on the significant work already delivered since its adoption in 2006, by embedding measurable biodiversity net gain across the authority.

·  Work in partnership with institutions, schools, businesses and community groups, to raise awareness and encourage wider biodiversity action across the City by:

o  Providing a range of public engagement and awareness campaigns to provide advice to residents and businesses on how to protect and enhance habitats within their neighbourhoods.

o  Promoting the adoption of the Local Nature Partnership ‘Developing with Nature Toolkit’ within all new major developments to ensure biodiversity best practice is implemented and recognised

o  Continuing to safeguard and enhance the trees of our urban forest to maximise their biodiversity benefits through the implementation of the adopted Tree Strategy (2016)

o  Encouraging and supporting urban agriculture as set out in the City Council Sustainable Food Policy,

o  Continuing to support the Local Wildlife Trust through a service level agreement (SLA) to ensure our designated Local Wildlife Sites reach and retain favourable conservation status

o  Continuing to support the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Environmental Records Centre through a SLA to ensure validated, up-to-date biodiversity data is captured and available to decision makers when considering the implications of development, land management and projects.

o  Continuing to support Natural Cambridgeshire, the Local Nature Partnership (LNP), to deliver the shared vision for ‘Cambridgeshire to be an exemplar for the landscape scale restoration of the natural environment’.

 

We further aspire to:

·  Ensure the delivery of biodiversity enhancements through our planning policy and development control functions by providing guidance to support existing biodiversity policies as part of the Greater Cambridge Sustainable Design and Construction SPD and forthcoming Greater Cambridge Biodiversity SPD. Development of the Joint Greater Cambridge Local Plan will enable the development of a mandatory biodiversity net gain policy for Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire, ensuring that this is a core principle for all future development across the Greater Cambridge Shared Planning Service

·  Establish a Cambridge Biodiversity Charter, calling on all organisations, businesses and individuals in the city to each establish their own Biodiversity Action Plans and to commit to enhancing their open spaces, to contribute towards a city’s wide net gain

·  Design new council housing for net gain of biodiversity and opportunities in the form of integral swift boxes, biodiverse green roofs and hedgehog highways etc, where viable.

·  Work with the Cambridgeshire County Council, Greater Cambridge Partnership and Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Combined Authority to promote sustainable transport by the implementation of biodiversity net gain targets

·  Establish a Biodiversity recognition scheme for schools / community groups / business and individual gardens.

 

Supporting Information:

Climate change, biodiversity and human health

https://www.who.int/globalchange/ecosystems/biodiversity/en/

WWF Living Planet report 2018

https://www.wwf.org.uk/sites/default/files/2018-10/wwfintl_livingplanet_full.pdf

Biodiversity: state of emergency https://news.cnrs.fr/articles/biodiversity-state-ofemergency https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/nature-conservation-strategy

https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/tree-strategy

Natural Cambridgeshire Vision  https://naturalcambridgeshire.org.uk/vision/

https://naturalcambridgeshire.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/nc-developing-with-nature-toolkit.pdf

 

Councillor Dalzell proposed and Councillor McGerty seconded the following amendment to motion (additional text underlined and deleted text struck through)

 

This Council notes with concern recent reports from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) on global species and habitat loss, and also that Cambridgeshire & Peterborough combined has one of the lowest percentages of land cover of priority habitats, natural green spaces and designated nature conservation sites in England, with only 6.5% of the land surface having statutory or non-statutory nature conservation designations and only approximately 8.5% being priority habitat.

 

We recognise the importance of a healthy and biodiverse environment that ensures our City’s future prosperity and supports the wellbeing of all who live, work and study here.

 

We therefore pledge to provide leadership and to ensure that we work with partners and our communities to reverse the decline in biodiversity and deliver measurable biodiversity net gain within Cambridge and the wider region.

 

Further to this, Council:

 

(1)  Declares its recognition of the global biodiversity emergency and the local impact this could have on the communities and businesses we serve

(2)  Pledges to act during the first year of Motion being accepted, to work towards future measurable biodiversity net gain for Cambridge, based on a full assessment of the scientific evidence on how best to achieve this

(3)  Pledges to develop plans for further action, in second year of Motion and beyond, to secure further biodiversity net gain.

 

(1)   Recognises the global biodiversity crisis, the impact this will have on our local community and its close link to the Climate Emergency declared at our last meeting. 

(2)  Renews this Council’s 2006 commitment to deliver a measurable biodiversity net gain for Cambridge, based on a full assessment of the scientific evidence and consultation with local stakeholders.

(3)  Pledges to identify actions that can be taken this year to protect and improve biodiversity in Cambridge, to bring a report to scrutiny committee in October to report on progress and develop a long-term spending plan for future budgets.

 

In recognition of this biodiversity emergency, during first year of Motion being accepted Cambridge City Council will:

 

·  Make the Council estate more hospitable to a wide range of plants and animals, including on our parks and open spaces.

·  Seek to eliminate unnecessary use of pesticides across the City Council estate.

·  Publish a Parks Biodiversity Toolkit to encourage community engagement with habitat creation such as flowering meadows for pollinating insects.

·  Identify how the City’s open spaces function as part of a Cambridgeshire coherent ecological network and prioritise areas for protection and enhancement.

·  Set measurable targets and standards for biodiversity increase, seeking to increase community engagement with habitat creation such as bee banks and ponds.

·  Work to improve the City Council Nature Conservation Strategy, building on the significant work already delivered since its adoption in 2006, by embedding measurable biodiversity net gain across the authority.

·  Work in partnership with neighbouring Councils, institutions, schools, businesses and community groups, to develop strategies raise awareness and encourage wider biodiversity action across the City by:

o  Providing a range of public engagement and awareness campaigns to provide advice to residents and businesses on how to protect and enhance habitats within their neighbourhoods.

o  Promoting the adoption of the Local Nature Partnership ‘Developing with Nature Toolkit’ within all new major developments to ensure biodiversity best practice is implemented and recognised.

o  Continuing to safeguard and enhance the trees of our urban forest to maximise their biodiversity benefits through the implementation of the adopted Tree Strategy (2016) and committing to increase the number of trees in Cambridge.

o  Develop a Hedge Strategy to protect and maximise the planting of high quality hedging across the city including major GCP projects and housing developments.

o  Encouraging and supporting urban agriculture as set out in the City Council Sustainable Food Policy,

o  Continuing to support the Local Wildlife Trust through a service level agreement (SLA) to ensure our designated Local Wildlife Sites reach and retain favourable conservation status.

o  Continuing to support the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Environmental Records Centre through a SLA to ensure validated, up-to-date biodiversity data is captured and available to decision makers when considering the implications of development, land management and projects.

o  Continuing to support Natural Cambridgeshire, the Local Nature Partnership (LNP), to deliver the shared vision for ‘Cambridgeshire to be an exemplar for the landscape scale restoration of the natural environment’.

 We further aspire to:

·  Ensure the delivery of biodiversity enhancements through our planning policy and development control functions by providing guidance to support existing biodiversity policies as part of the Greater Cambridge Sustainable Design and Construction SPD and forthcoming Greater Cambridge Biodiversity SPD. Development of the Joint Greater Cambridge Local Plan will enable the development of a mandatory biodiversity net gain policy for Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire, ensuring that this is a core principle for all future development across the Greater Cambridge Shared Planning Service

·  Establish a Cambridge Biodiversity Charter, calling on all organisations, businesses and individuals in the city to each establish their own Biodiversity Action Plans and to commit to enhancing their open spaces, to contribute towards a city’s wide net gain

·  Design new council housing for net gain of biodiversity and opportunities in the form of integral swift boxes, biodiverse green roofs and hedgehog highways etc, where viable.

·  Work with the Cambridgeshire County Council, Greater Cambridge Partnership and Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Combined Authority to promote sustainable transport by the implementation of biodiversity net gain targets

·  Establish a Biodiversity recognition scheme for schools / community groups / business and individual gardens.

 

Supporting Information:

Climate change, biodiversity and human health

https://www.who.int/globalchange/ecosystems/biodiversity/en/

WWF Living Planet report 2018

https://www.wwf.org.uk/sites/default/files/2018-10/wwfintl_livingplanet_full.pdf

Biodiversity: state of emergency https://news.cnrs.fr/articles/biodiversity-state-ofemergency https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/nature-conservation-strategy

https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/tree-strategy

Natural Cambridgeshire Vision https://naturalcambridgeshire.org.uk/vision/

https://naturalcambridgeshire.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/nc-developing-with-nature-toolkit.pdf

 

On a show of hands the amendment was lost by 11 votes to 22 (with Councillor Hipkin recorded as abstaining)

 

Resolved (unanimously):

 

This Council notes with concern recent reports from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) on global species and habitat loss, and also that  Cambridgeshire & Peterborough combined has one of the lowest percentages of land cover of priority habitats, natural green spaces and designated nature conservation sites in England, with only 6.5% of the land surface having statutory or non-statutory nature conservation designations and only approximately 8.5% being priority habitat.

 

We recognise the importance of a healthy and biodiverse environment that ensures our City’s future prosperity and supports the wellbeing of all who live, work and study here.

 

We therefore pledge to provide leadership and to ensure that we work with partners and our communities to reverse the decline in biodiversity and deliver measurable biodiversity net gain within Cambridge and the wider region.

 

Further to this, Council:

 

(4)  Declares its recognition of the global biodiversity emergency and the local impact this could have on the communities and businesses we serve

(5)  Pledges to act during the first year of Motion being accepted, to work towards future measurable biodiversity net gain for Cambridge, based on a full assessment of the scientific evidence on how best to achieve this

(6)  Pledges to develop plans for further action, in second year of Motion and beyond, to secure further biodiversity net gain.

 

In recognition of this biodiversity emergency, during first year of Motion being accepted Cambridge City Council will:

 

·  Make the Council estate more hospitable to a wide range of plants and animals, including on our parks and open spaces.

·  Publish a Parks Biodiversity Toolkit to encourage community engagement with habitat creation such as flowering meadows for pollinating insects.

·  Identify how the City’s open spaces function as part of a Cambridgeshire coherent ecological network and prioritise areas for protection and enhancement.

·  Set measurable targets and standards for biodiversity increase, seeking to increase community engagement with habitat creation such as bee banks and ponds.

·  Work to improve the City Council Nature Conservation Strategy, building on the significant work already delivered since its adoption in 2006, by embedding measurable biodiversity net gain across the authority.

·  Work in partnership with institutions, schools, businesses and community groups, to raise awareness and encourage wider biodiversity action across the City by:

o  Providing a range of public engagement and awareness campaigns to provide advice to residents and businesses on how to protect and enhance habitats within their neighbourhoods.

o  Promoting the adoption of the Local Nature Partnership ‘Developing with Nature Toolkit’ within all new major developments to ensure biodiversity best practice is implemented and recognised

o  Continuing to safeguard and enhance the trees of our urban forest to maximise their biodiversity benefits through the implementation of the adopted Tree Strategy (2016)

o  Encouraging and supporting urban agriculture as set out in the City Council Sustainable Food Policy,

o  Continuing to support the Local Wildlife Trust through a service level agreement (SLA) to ensure our designated Local Wildlife Sites reach and retain favourable conservation status

o  Continuing to support the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Environmental Records Centre through a SLA to ensure validated, up-to-date biodiversity data is captured and available to decision makers when considering the implications of development, land management and projects.

o  Continuing to support Natural Cambridgeshire, the Local Nature Partnership (LNP), to deliver the shared vision for ‘Cambridgeshire to be an exemplar for the landscape scale restoration of the natural environment’.

 

We further aspire to:

·  Ensure the delivery of biodiversity enhancements through our planning policy and development control functions by providing guidance to support existing biodiversity policies as part of the Greater Cambridge Sustainable Design and Construction SPD and forthcoming Greater Cambridge Biodiversity SPD. Development of the Joint Greater Cambridge Local Plan will enable the development of a mandatory biodiversity net gain policy for Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire, ensuring that this is a core principle for all future development across the Greater Cambridge Shared Planning Service

·  Establish a Cambridge Biodiversity Charter, calling on all organisations, businesses and individuals in the city to each establish their own Biodiversity Action Plans and to commit to enhancing their open spaces, to contribute towards a city’s wide net gain

·  Design new council housing for net gain of biodiversity and opportunities in the form of integral swift boxes, biodiverse green roofs and hedgehog highways etc, where viable.

·  Work with the Cambridgeshire County Council, Greater Cambridge Partnership and Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Combined Authority to promote sustainable transport by the implementation of biodiversity net gain targets

·  Establish a Biodiversity recognition scheme for schools / community groups / business and individual gardens.

 

Supporting Information:

Climate change, biodiversity and human health

https://www.who.int/globalchange/ecosystems/biodiversity/en/

WWF Living Planet report 2018

https://www.wwf.org.uk/sites/default/files/2018-10/wwfintl_livingplanet_full.pdf

Biodiversity: state of emergency https://news.cnrs.fr/articles/biodiversity-state-ofemergency https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/nature-conservation-strategy

https://www.cambridge.gov.uk/tree-strategy

Natural Cambridgeshire Vision  https://naturalcambridgeshire.org.uk/vision/

https://naturalcambridgeshire.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/nc-developing-with-nature-toolkit.pdf

 

19/15/CNLd

Councillor Thittala: Supporting overseas nurses in developing their English proficiency

Along with other UK cities, Cambridge is suffering a severe shortage of trained nurses and nursing staff in the NHS, and of care staff locally. Problems of recruitment and retention are made far worse by the setting of English language standards not always appropriate to the roles, and inadequate supplementary English classes following the recruitment of staff from overseas, or for potential staff already in the UK.

 

The Council asks the Leader of the Council to write to:

1. The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) to step in and address this unfair practice. The NMC requires a score of 7 out of 9, which is about 78%, but requesting to conduct a consultation to reduce it to 6.5, which is still a 72% pass mark, for those nurses, worked and settled in the United Kingdom and worked in the health sector for more than 4 years;

2.  The NMC requesting they conduct an immediate consultation on improving recruitment and addressing the barriers to people where English is their second language; 

3.  CUHS and Addenbrookes asking them to review their overseas recruitment policy, including of staff where their English can be improved while in work;

4. The Secretary of State for Health calling for Government intervention to address the national shortage of nurses in our NHS, and in Cambridge. 

 

Minutes:

Councillors Gehring and Smith declared personal interests as being employed by Cambridge University and Cambridge Assessment respectively and they would not vote on the Motion.

 

Councillor Thittala amended his motion under Council Procedure Rule 26 and Councillor McQueen seconded the following motion (additional text underlined and deleted text struck through):

 

Along with other UK cities, Cambridge is suffering a severe shortage of trained nurses and nursing staff in the NHS, and of care staff locally. Problems of recruitment and retention are made far worse by the setting of English language standards not always appropriate to the roles, and inadequate supplementary English classes following the recruitment of staff from overseas, or for potential staff already in the UK.

 

The Council asks the Leader of the Council to write to:

1.The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) asking them to step in and address this unfair practice and requesting that they conduct a consultation to reduce the required English proficiency score. so. The NMC requires a score of 7 out of 9, which is about 78%, but the consultation should consider reducing it to requesting to conduct a consultation to reduce it to 6.5, which is still a 72% pass mark, for those nurses who worked and are settled in the United Kingdom and have worked in the UK health sector for more than 4 years;

2.The NMC requesting they conduct an immediate consultation on improving recruitment and addressing the barriers to people where English is their second language; 

3.CUHS and Addenbrookes Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust asking them to review their overseas recruitment policy, including of staff where their whose English can be improved while in work;

4.The Secretary of State for Health calling for Government intervention to address the national shortage of nurses in our NHS, and in Cambridge.

 

Resolved (by 30 votes to 0)

 

Along with other UK cities, Cambridge is suffering a severe shortage of trained nurses and nursing staff in the NHS, and of care staff locally. Problems of recruitment and retention are made far worse by the setting of English language standards not always appropriate to roles, and inadequate supplementary English classes following the recruitment of staff from overseas, or for potential staff already in the UK.

 

The Council asks the Leader of the Council to write to:

1.The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) asking them to step in and address this unfair practice and requesting that they conduct a consultation to reduce the required English proficiency score. The NMC requires a score of 7 out of 9, which is about 78%, but the consultation should consider reducing it to 6.5, which is still a 72% pass mark, for those nurses who  are settled in the United Kingdom and have worked in the UK health sector for more than 4 years;

2.The NMC requesting they conduct an immediate consultation on improving recruitment and addressing the barriers to people where English is their second language; 

3.Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust asking them to review their overseas recruitment policy, including of staff whose English can be improved while in work;

4.The Secretary of State for Health calling for Government intervention to address the national shortage of nurses in our NHS, and in Cambridge.

 

 

 

 

19/16/CNL

Written questions

No discussion will take place on this item. Members will be asked to note the written questions and answers document as circulated around the Chamber.

 

Minutes:

Members were asked to note the written questions and answers that had been placed in the information pack circulated around the Chamber.