A Cambridge City Council website

Cambridge City Council

Council and democracy

Home > Council and Democracy > Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, The Guildhall, Market Square, Cambridge, CB2 3QJ. View directions

Contact: Democratic Services  Committee Manager

Link: Video recording of the meeting

Items
No. Item

18/51/CNL

Minutes pdf icon PDF 366 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of the meeting held on the 19 July 2018 were confirmed as a correct record and signed by the Mayor.

18/52/CNL

Mayor's announcements

Minutes:

Apologies

Apologies had been received from Councillors Tunnacliffe, Page-Croft and Price. Councillor Payne provided apologies for arriving late.

 

Mayor’s Day Out

The annual outing for senior citizens to Felixstowe in August was a huge success and the Mayor thanked councillors who helped with stewarding.

 

Chariots of Fire

The Mayor was honoured to join the High Sheriff in presenting the awards at the event this year. The turnout was fantastic and the event was enjoyable.

 

Annual Firework Display

Members were reminded of their invitation to the Annual Firework Display on Monday 5 November on Midsummer Common. The VIP reception would start at 6.00pm, in the Cambridge Live Tent with the fireworks starting at 7.00pm.

 

Remembrance

The Remembrance Sunday civic service would take place on Sunday 11 November at Great St. Mary’s Church at 10.55 a.m. The Mayor reminded Members that it was the 100th anniversary of World War I and asked Members to let the Sergeant-at-Mace know whether they would be attending the service.

 

Chevyn Service

Notice was given that the preaching of the Chevyn Sermon would take place on Sunday 27 January 2019 and that invitations would be sent out nearer the time.

 

RETURNING OFFICER REPORT

Council noted the Returning Officer’s report that Kelley Green had been elected following the by-election for Petersfield on 13 September. 

 

 

18/53/CNL

Declarations of Interest

Minutes:

Name

Item

Interest

Cantrill

18/57/CNL

Trustee of Wintercomfort

Johnson

18/58/CNL7b

Employee of Daniel Zeichner MP

Moore

18/56/CNL5b

Personal interest regarding special responsibility allowance report

Herbert

18/56/CNL5b

Personal interest regarding special responsibility allowance report

Thornburrow

18/55/CNL4e

Owned a narrow boat moored on private land within jurisdiction of the Cam Conservators

Baigent

18/56/CNL5b

Personal interest regarding special responsibility allowance report.

Massey

18/56/CNL5b

Personal interest regarding special responsibility allowance report

Ashton

18/55/CNL4a

Chair of Cherry Hinton Residents Association

Gillespie

18/55/CNL4a and 18/55/CNL4c

Works for University of Cambridge and had attended a short course with Allia Limited

 

18/54/CNL

Public questions time

Minutes:

A member of the public asked the following question as set out below:

 

1.  Please can the council executive commission officers to explore commissioning large photographic reproductions of the glass plate negatives of the women who made modern Cambridge currently residing in the Palmer Clark archive in the Cambridgeshire Collection; given that the only woman whose painting is on the walls of the large hall in the Guildhall is that of Queen Victoria.

 

The Executive Councillor for Communities responded as follows:

 

i.  She thanked Mr Carpen for raising this issue and for his work on the Vote 100 events (celebrating 100 years since Parliament passed a law which allowed some women to vote). Mr Carpen was correct in saying that the photographs on display were unrepresentative of the achievements of women in Cambridge and she would like to see a more diverse range of paintings. She invited Mr Carpen to meet with officers to discuss ways of taking this matter forward.

18/55/CNL

To consider the recommendations of the Executive for adoption

18/55/CNLa

Cambridge Local Plan: Towards 2031 - Adoption (Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport) pdf icon PDF 183 KB

Attached separately.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 37 votes to 0) to:

 

  i.  Adopt the Cambridge Local Plan 2018 including both Main and Additional Modifications (Appendix 4 to the Officers report); 

  ii.  Adopt the Cambridge Policies Map 2018, including Main Modifications (Appendix 5 to the Officers report); and

  iii.  Authorise the Joint Director of Planning and Economic Development for Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire, in consultation with the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport, and the Chair and Spokes for the Planning Policy and Transport Scrutiny Committee, to make minor typographical amendments or updates in preparing the final version of the Adopted Local Plan and Policies Map.

 

18/55/CNLb

Housing Revenue Account Medium Term Financial Strategy 2018/19 (Executive Councillor for Housing) pdf icon PDF 179 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 25 votes to 0) to:

 

  i.  Approve proposals for changes in existing housing capital budgets, as introduced in Sections 6 and 7 and detailed in Appendix E of the Officer’s report, with the resulting position summarised in Appendix H.

 

18/55/CNLc

Treasury Management Half Yearly Update Report 2018/19 (Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources) pdf icon PDF 203 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

  i.  Approve the report which included the Council’s estimated Prudential and Treasury Indicators 2018/19 to 2021/22.

  ii.  Approve a £5m limit on secured bonds with local businesses subject to due diligence as highlighted in paragraph 8 of the officer’s report.

  iii.  Update the Minimum Revenue Provision (MRP) Policy to state that no MRP will be required if this bond is secured, but this would be reviewed at least annually.

  iv.  Agree the principle of investing up to £5m in a bond issued by Allia Limited, and delegate to the Head of Finance the final decision on the appropriateness of this investment, once detailed due diligence has been completed as set out in paragraph 8.9 of the Officer’s report;

  v.  Increase the counterparty limit for Barclays Bank Plc by £10m to £35m; and;

  vi.  Reduce the Money Market Fund (MMF) counterparty limit by £10m to £5m for each fund, with a total MMF limit of £20m (and to continue using MMFs that were rated AAA).

 

18/55/CNLd

General Fund Medium Term Financial Strategy (MTFS) October 2018 (Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources) pdf icon PDF 217 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (by 26 votes to 0) to:

 

i.  Agree the budget strategy and timetable as outlined in Section 1 [pages 1 to 3 refer] of the MTFS document.

ii.  Agree the incorporation of changed assumptions and indicative net unavoidable budget pressures identified in Section 4 [pages 15 to 18 refer]. This provides an indication of the net savings requirements, by year for the next 5 years, and revised General Fund revenue, funding and reserves projections as shown in Section 5 [pages 19 to 20 refer] of the MTFS document.

iii.  Note the changes to the Capital Plan as set out in Section 6 [pages 21 to 27 refer] and Appendix A [pages 35 to 40 refer] of the MTFS document and agree the new proposals:

 

 

iv.  Agree the remit of the Cambridge Live Development Fund (1.4.18 to 31.3.20) to support the transformation and ongoing development of Cambridge Live over the next two years subject to a maximum spend of £500,000 with full delegation for management of the Fund assigned to the Chief Executive

v.  Agree changes to General Fund Reserve levels, with the Prudent Minimum Balance being set at £5.504m and the target level at £6.605m as detailed in Section 7 [pages 28 to 31 refer] and Appendix B [pages 41 to 42 refer] of the Officer’s report.

18/55/CNLe

Council Appointments to the Conservators of the River Cam (Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces) pdf icon PDF 185 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

  i.  Approve the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces recommendation of the non-councillor appointments to the Conservators of the River Cam commencing 1 January 2019:

a.  Jim Ross

b.  Kate Hurst

c.  May Block

d.  Ceridwen Salisbury

  ii.  Approve the nominations of three City Councillor appointments (two Labour and one Liberal Democrat appointment) to the Conservators of the River Cam commencing 1 January 2019:

  a.  Councillor Sargeant

    b.  Councillor Massey

  c.    Councillor Tunnacliffe

  iii.  Approve Councillor Sargeant to the vacant seat held by former Councillor Sinnott to 31 December 2018.

18/56/CNL

To consider the recommendations of Committees for adoption

18/56/CNLa

Licensing Committee:Statement of Gambling Principles pdf icon PDF 85 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

i.  Approve the Statement of Gambling Principles for publication on 3 January 2019, and for it to come into effect on 31 January 2019.

18/56/CNLb

Civic Affairs Committee: Independent Remuneration Panel - Special Responsibility Allowance pdf icon PDF 287 KB

Recommendation to follow.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved by (24 votes to 0) to:

 

i.  Approve that each of the roles detailed in the table below should receive an SRA in the following percentages of Basic Allowance and that these allowances be back-dated to thestart of the Municipal Year.

 

Role Title

Percentage of Basic Allowance

Combined Authority:

Cabinet Member (1)

100%

Combined Authority:

Members on the Overview and Scrutiny Committee (2)

25%

Combined Authority:

Member on the Audit and Governance Committee (1)

10%

Greater Cambridge Partnership:

Assembly Members (3)

15%

Police and Crime Panel Member (1)

15%

 

 

ii.  Agree the allowances detailed in i be reviewed in 2020 to take account of any further changes in roles and responsibilities.

iii.  Agree that travel allowance costs to city council meetings be amended as follows:

 

For Cambridge City Council meetings only, Members can claim travel costs from outside Cambridge if their absence from Cambridge was unavoidable or if a meeting was called at short notice and that Member had to make a journey which would not otherwise have been made. The exception to this rule is attending Planning or Licensing Committee meetings, as these take place more frequently than other meetings.

If a claim is made and an officer is unclear whether or not the travel expense should be reimbursed, the officer shall consult the political group leaders prior to approving payment. If any claim remains unresolved, it is the responsibility of the Chief Executive to determine.

18/56/CNLc

Civic Affairs Committee: Process for scrutiny of the Council's budget pdf icon PDF 396 KB

Recommendation to follow.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved by (25 votes to 13) to:

 

i.  Change the Council’s budget and policy framework procedure (part 4c) and Council Procedure Rules appendix 2 budget recommendations and amendments (part 4a) as set out in the adoption minute contained in the Information Pack.

 

(These changes reflect option A, as amended by Committee, described in the report)

18/57/CNL

To deal with oral questions

Minutes:

1) Councillor McGerty to the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces

 

Is the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces satisfied with the level of street cleaning provided by the council?

 

The Executive Councillor confirmed that she was satisfied with the level of street cleansing provided by the Council but was not satisfied by the mess created by certain individuals. She confirmed that an anti-litter campaign was coming soon and offered Councillor McGerty the opportunity to spend a day with herself and the Street Cleansing Team. She commented that she hoped Ward Councillors would report any cleansing issues identified in Market Ward. 

 

2) Councillor Massey to theExecutive Councillor for Housing

 

What is the Executive Councillor for Housing’s opinion on the recent announcement by the Prime Minister to scrap the borrowing cap that local authorities can borrow against their housing stock?

 

The Executive Councillor welcomed the development to remove the cap on borrowing but commented that the devil would be in the detail. Councils were due to be consulted on the proposals and he anticipated that further information would emerge in the budget on the 29 October.  He commented that the Secretary of State for Housing needed to be held to her promise and that he would continue to press Central Government for further affordable housing reform measures, for example the increased flexibility for using right to buy housing receipts.

 

3) Councillor Thittala to the Executive Councillor for Communities

 

Can the Executive Councillor provide an update on the free holiday lunch scheme?

 

The Executive Councillor paid tribute to Councillor Johnson who had previously held the Executive Councillor for Communities role. She commented that for many families holidays were a difficult time; the free holiday lunch scheme was open to everyone and was not means tested. There were five venues the scheme was offered in the City: Buchan Street Neighbourhood Centre, Ross Street Community Centre, Brown's Field Youth and Community Centre, Meadows Community Centre and the Church of the Good Shepherd (run by the Church not the Council).

 

The number of free holiday lunches provided to date in 2018 was 248 during Easter, 198 during May half term and 1314 during the summer.

 

Over October half term, lunches were being piloted at a new venue in Queen Edith ward and Trumpington Pavilion (the latter in partnership with Cambridge Sustainable food). There were also plans to develop a lunch offer in Abbey ward with various partners later in the year. Buchan Street Neighbourhood Centre would be providing Christmas meals for families and also supporting community groups to run an event between Christmas and New Year. For the first time, a holiday lunch was planned between Christmas and New Year at Brown’s Field Community Centre.

 

4) Councillor Cantrill to the Executive Councillor for Housing

 

Last week marked the world homeless day.  At the same time research was published that showed at least 449 homeless people died in the UK in the last 12 months. 

 

As we come into the winter months, does the Exec Cllr believe that the council is doing everything possible to address the homeless crisis we see on the streets of Cambridge?

 

The Executive Councillor commented that during the winter months (from November to March 2019) when the Severe Weather Emergency Protocol (SWEP) starts, 46 additional beds would be provided when the weather turns bad. SWEP beds were not provided continuously during this period but were provided by the council in response to SWEP conditions. The Council adopted a more common sense approach of SWEP and would make beds available when there was a prolonged period of wet and cold weather even if the temperature had not been freezing. Advice on applying SWEP was taken from the Outreach Team and Jimmy’s.  SWEP was open to all and there was no local connection criteria, all that was asked was for people to behave acceptably. Last year there was only one evening when SWEP beds reached capacity.

 

5) Councillor Barnett to theExecutive Councillor for Communities

 

Can the Executive Councillor provide an update on the work of the Activate project and the impact it is having?

 

The Executive Councillor stated that the Activate project supported children and young people to build essential skills and confidence as they moved into secondary education and was about to start its third year of delivery. The young people involved were pupils at Coleridge Community College, and project partners include Cambridge Junction, Kettle’s Yard, The University of Cambridge Museums, New International Theatre, Museum of Cambridge, and Menagerie Theatre. Young people who had not previously taken part in creative activities were recruited annually to take part in weekly after school sessions, some on school premises and some at the partner venues. They took part in a structured programme designed to support the development of skills in creativity and communication, to build confidence and resilience, both in and out of the classroom, and to introduce them to the rich cultural life of the city. As part of the process they had opportunities to perform and present their work, and to gain Arts Award qualifications. Fifty six young people had taken part in the programme so far, not including children and young people attending the performances and presentations given by the Activate students.

 

6) Councillor Pippas to the Executive Councillor for Housing

 

Can the Executive Councillor provide the council with an update on the program of smoke detection safety checks in Council owned properties?

 

The Executive Councillor confirmed that there was a programme to check and renew smoke detectors; these were checked annually as part of gas servicing and when properties were vacant. Detectors were replaced on a programmed basis every 10 years. Contactors had fallen behind on this work last year but the programme was now up to date. There were some problems in replacing detectors as tenants had not allowed contractors access to their properties, officers would continue to contact tenants to persuade them of the importance of this work. Where properties had fire alarm systems these were checked and serviced every quarter. There were on-going information campaigns to remind tenants and leaseholders of the importance of their role in fire safety and this included asking them to report any concerns that they had about their detectors to the council. 

 

7) Councillor Bird to the Leader

Can the Leader write to the Post Office and the Government stating his opposition on behalf of Council to the loss of our separate main street central and accessible Cambridge Crown Post Office, now proposed to be taken over by WH Smith’s and located somewhere inside their city store?

 

The Leader expressed disappointment that the Post Office had brought this proposal forward. He commented that the issue had arisen following a deal which had been struck by the Liberal Democrat Leader regarding the privatisation of Royal Mail, which also provided for WH Smith to have an interest in Royal Mail. The Post Office was run by professional postal workers who have been trained; the building was in an accessible location for all people. He commented that people needed to support this campaign. 

 

8) Councillor O’Connell to the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre

What steps were taken to publicise and consult on alternatives to the sudden removal of mixed recycling bins at Newmarket Road and Hauxton Road recycling points?

 

The Executive Councillor commented that one of the mixed recycling bins hadn’t been removed yet. There were two recycling points one at Waitrose on Hauxton Road and one at Tesco on Newmarket Road. These recycling points were for complementary recycling (ie: for those materials that were not able to be taken from residential recycling collections). Blue bins were also available at these sites so that anyone with extra recycling could use these.  Unfortunately fly tipping had occurred at these sites, which were owned by the supermarkets and not the Council. The supermarkets had asked for the mixed recycling bins to be removed as they had had a lot of complaints from their customers. Members of the public were not consulted but consultation had taken place with the owners of the land, who had asked for the points to be removed. Posters had been displayed to advise members of the public that the mixed recycling bins were going to be removed, the bins at Hauxton Road had been removed and the bins at Newmarket Road would be removed at the end of the month.

 

9) Councillor O’Reilly to the Executive Councillor for Communities

Can the Executive Councillor provide us an update on the work ChYpPS have done to engage young people with local democracy?

 

The Executive Councillor commented that the Council’s engagement work was led by Steph Burwitz in the ChYpPS team and the following projects had been undertaken this year:

 

Take over days in East Chesterton and Kings Hedges, these days included working with young people to talk about particular issues in their area and what they would like ChYpPs to deliver next; and travel provision. Young people had also organised litter picking sessions in their local area. A consultation on the Abbey BMX tracks had been undertaken to ensure that the young people who used the tracks had been fully consulted on the changes proposed and work was in progress with the Streets and Open Spaces Team to look at next steps. Work had also been undertaken with the Greater Cambridge Partnership to consult with young people to consider improvements in the City Centre. There was a further take over day on the 23rd November 2018 which would focus ontravel around the city and community safety.

 

ChYpPS had supported S106 bids for three park improvements at Lichfield Road, Gunhild Close and Trumpington Recreation Ground based on earlier feedback from children in the local area. These play areas were currently at the design and consultation phase.

 

The following oral questions were tabled but owing to the expiry of the period of time permitted, were not covered during the meeting. The Mayor asked Executive Councillors if a written response could be provided to those questions that had not been covered.

 

10) Councillor Todd-Jones to the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre

There has been a lot of media interest this week in what has been described as over-tourism in Cambridge. Can the Executive Councillor tell me what sparked the furore and what we are doing about it?

 

11) Councillor McQueen to the Executive Councillor for Housing

What has the Council been doing to promote national Empty Homes Week, which started this Monday?

 

12) Councillor Smart to the Executive Councillor for Communities

Can the Executive Councillor update us on Volunteer Cambridge, which is taking place on Saturday 20th October?

 

13) Councillor Page-Croft to the Executive Councillor for Planning and Transport

Is the Executive Councillor satisfied with the service from Stagecoach?

 

14) Councillor Sargeant to the Executive Councillor for Communities

What will be the benefit to Cambridge of the new City Fibre broadband network?

 

15) Councillor Holt to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport

Would the Executive Councillor like to join with me in congratulating MUMA LLP, the architect of the Community Centre, Eddington - for being shortlisted for the Stirling Prize for Architecture and for being awarded East Building of the Year and East Sustainability Building of the year by RIBA for 2018?  www.architecture.com/about/press-office

 

16) Councillor Payne to the Leader

Will the Leader make a public statement of support for transgender people?

 

17) Councillor Baigent to the Executive Councillor for Communities

What is the aim of the Council’s revised policy for storage for communal areas?

 

18) Councillor Gehring to the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces

Given that the proposed toilet strategy remains elusive after being promised for over two years, how will the Council improve the cleanliness of basic facilities at a time when our parks and open spaces are in use all year around?

 

19) Councillor Martinelli Executive Councillor for Environmental Services and City Centre

The Executive Councillor has recently approved changes to waste collection including reducing the frequency of green bin collection, in the context of having already increased the price residents pay for a second green bin. What would the Executive Councillor recommend that people do with their food waste during the four week periods without a collection, especially over Christmas and New Year? 

 

20) Councillor Gillespie to the Executive Councillor for Communities

Is the Executive Councillor aware of the extent of open drug dealing in the city centre, and can she tell us how it will be brought under control?

 

21) Councillor Dalzell to the Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources

Does the Executive Councillor agree that the local introduction of the chronically underfunded Universal Credit system is likely to have a negative impact on the vulnerable claimants in our city?

 

Secondary Question

 

1) Councillor Bird to the Executive Councillor for Housing

Can the Executive Councillor for Housing provide a brief update on progress in delivering new council homes for rent under the Devolution Agreement?

18/58/CNL

To consider the following notices of motion, notice of which has been given by:

18/58/CNLa

Councillor Johnson - Abolition of Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988

This Council:

 

·  Notes that with many people unable to afford to buy a home, the number of households nationally who are renting privately has almost doubled over the last 20 years, and it is estimated that one-third of households in Cambridge are renting privately;

 

·  Further notes that in July of this year the Government consulted on changes to the length of fixed-term tenancies from six months to three years, whilst still permitting a tenant to end a tenancy early if they wish. The Council supports these changes as it provides greater security and peace of mind for tenants, and allows them a certain degree of flexibility in case their circumstances change;

 

·  Regrets that the Government did not consult on reforming or abolishing Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988, which permits landlords to evict tenants at the end of a fixed-term tenancy without providing them with a reason. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation and University of Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research recently estimated that 80 percent of all evictions since 2015 occurred under the provisions of Section 21 and is a major cause of homelessness in Cambridge and elsewhere;

 

·  Acknowledges that the threat of a “no-fault eviction” causes insecurity and stress for those who rent privately and can discourage tenants from complaining about substandard housing;

 

·  Recognises that the City Council, along with other registered social landlords, support tenants as much as possible, with eviction used always as a last resort;

 

·  Resolves for the Leader to write to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, asking him to abolish Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 and to speedily implement the Government’s other proposal to extend fixed-term tenancies as the first steps to end insecurity and unfairness in the private rental sector.?

 

Minutes:

Councillor Johnson proposed and Councillor Sheil seconded the following motion:

 

This Council:

 

·  Notes that with many people unable to afford to buy a home, the number of households nationally who are renting privately has almost doubled over the last 20 years, and it is estimated that one-third of households in Cambridge are renting privately;

 

·  Further notes that in July of this year the Government consulted on changes to the length of fixed-term tenancies from six months to three years, whilst still permitting a tenant to end a tenancy early if they wish. The Council supports these changes as it provides greater security and peace of mind for tenants, and allows them a certain degree of flexibility in case their circumstances change;

 

·  Regrets that the Government did not consult on reforming or abolishing Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988, which permits landlords to evict tenants at the end of a fixed-term tenancy without providing them with a reason. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation and University of Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research recently estimated that 80 percent of all evictions since 2015 occurred under the provisions of Section 21 and is a major cause of homelessness in Cambridge and elsewhere;

 

·  Acknowledges that the threat of a “no-fault eviction” causes insecurity and stress for those who rent privately and can discourage tenants from complaining about substandard housing;

 

·  Recognises that the City Council, along with other registered social landlords, support tenants as much as possible, with eviction used always as a last resort;

 

·  Resolves for the Leader to write to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, asking him to abolish Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 and to speedily implement the Government’s other proposal to extend fixed-term tenancies as the first steps to end insecurity and unfairness in the private rental sector.?

 

Resolved (unanimously) to support the motion.

 

 

18/58/CNLb

Councillor Cantrill - People's Vote motion

In the 2016 Referendum on the European Union Cambridge voted over 73% in favour of remaining in the European Union.

 

The negotiations on withdrawal that have followed the national decision to leave the EU have progressed at a slow rate and the precise nature of any final deal is still uncertain with clear divisions among those who voted to leave and a lack of support among the Government’s members of parliament for the adopted ‘Chequers proposals’. It is therefore clear that there is uncertainty whether any final deal will have wholehearted support and can be carried through Parliament.

 

In recent months a campaign has developed which proposes a People’s Vote on any final deal (or no deal), with the alternative to remain in the EU, to ensure that the path taken has majority support among the electorate.

 

A number of letters/emails have been received by members asking the Council to support this initiative.

 

The Council notes that:

 

(i)  The Governor of the Bank of England has stated that the average household income in Britain is now £900 lower than that anticipated if the decision to leave the EU had not been taken.

 

(ii)    There are a large number of non-UK EU nationals resident in Cambridge whose life, and that of their UK-national families, has been destabilised by uncertainty. Apart from the social impacts, this has resulted in the loss of staff by local businesses and the NHS.

 

(iii)   Due to uncertainty about whether the deal that will be agreed with the EU will achieve a Parliamentary majority, ‘no deal’ appears a very credible outcome. This has been described by Chancellor Hammond as having “large fiscal consequences” and by independent observers as “overwhelmingly negative”.

 

(iv)   All avenues currently being considered by the Government impose increasing delays for goods at our international frontiers and no facilitation would be provided for trade in services which form a major element in the local economy.

 

(v)    Recent opinion poll evidence has suggested an overall trend in public opinion away from support for leaving  the EU and in favour of a vote on the conditions of any departure. A vote on the terms of withdrawal with the option to remain would ensure that we leave, should we do so, with wholehearted support for the actual conditions of withdrawal.

 

(vi)   The anticipated rapidly deteriorating economic situation if Brexit proceeds is likely to accelerate austerity, which has already caused acute problems in providing local authority services and has severely affected local residents, in particular those in social housing or in receipt of benefits.

 

(vii)  Evidence of illegal overspending has been presented (and accepted by the Electoral Commission) and court challenges on the constitutional position are still continuing. A vote on the withdrawal terms would ensure that any decision is accepted as sound by both sides of the argument rather than being fought out in the courts.

 

The Council believes that the interests of its residents would be best protected by a People’s Vote on the terms  ...  view the full agenda text for item 18/58/CNLb

Minutes:

Councillor Cantrill proposed and Councillor Gehring seconded the following motion:

 

In the 2016 Referendum on the European Union Cambridge voted over 73% in favour of remaining in the European Union.

 

The negotiations on withdrawal that have followed the national decision to leave the EU have progressed at a slow rate and the precise nature of any final deal is still uncertain with clear divisions among those who voted to leave and a lack of support among the Government’s members of parliament for the adopted ‘Chequers proposals’. It is therefore clear that there is uncertainty whether any final deal will have wholehearted support and can be carried through Parliament.

 

In recent months a campaign has developed which proposes a People’s Vote on any final deal (or no deal), with the alternative to remain in the EU, to ensure that the path taken has majority support among the electorate.

 

A number of letters/emails have been received by members asking the Council to support this initiative.

 

The Council notes that:

 

(i)  The Governor of the Bank of England has stated that the average household income in Britain is now £900 lower than that anticipated if the decision to leave the EU had not been taken.

 

(ii)    There are a large number of non-UK EU nationals resident in Cambridge whose life, and that of their UK-national families, has been destabilised by uncertainty. Apart from the social impacts, this has resulted in the loss of staff by local businesses and the NHS.

 

(iii)   Due to uncertainty about whether the deal that will be agreed with the EU will achieve a Parliamentary majority, ‘no deal’ appears a very credible outcome. This has been described by Chancellor Hammond as having “large fiscal consequences” and by independent observers as “overwhelmingly negative”.

 

(iv)   All avenues currently being considered by the Government impose increasing delays for goods at our international frontiers and no facilitation would be provided for trade in services which form a major element in the local economy.

 

(v)    Recent opinion poll evidence has suggested an overall trend in public opinion away from support for leaving  the EU and in favour of a vote on the conditions of any departure. A vote on the terms of withdrawal with the option to remain would ensure that we leave, should we do so, with wholehearted support for the actual conditions of withdrawal.

 

(vi)   The anticipated rapidly deteriorating economic situation if Brexit proceeds is likely to accelerate austerity, which has already caused acute problems in providing local authority services and has severely affected local residents, in particular those in social housing or in receipt of benefits.

 

(vii)  Evidence of illegal overspending has been presented (and accepted by the Electoral Commission) and court challenges on the constitutional position are still continuing. A vote on the withdrawal terms would ensure that any decision is accepted as sound by both sides of the argument rather than being fought out in the courts.

 

The Council believes that the interests of its residents would be best protected by a People’s Vote on the terms of leaving the European Union with the possibility of rescinding Article 50 and remaining in the EU.

 

The Council calls on the Government to abandon plans for a hard Brexit and to give Cambridge residents the opportunity to assess the original promises of a seamless Brexit with minimal impact made by the Leave campaign by giving the electorate (including resident European citizens) a vote on whether to accept the proposed withdrawal arrangements or to retain the many benefits local residents currently enjoy by staying in the European Union.

 

The Council should write to our two local MPs calling on them to clearly support a People’s Vote.

 

Councillor Smith proposed and Councillor Baigent seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struck through and additional text underlined):

 

In the 2016 Referendum on the European Union Cambridge voted over 73% in favour of remaining in the European Union.

 

The negotiations on withdrawal that have followed the national decision to leave the EU have progressed at a slow rate and the precise nature of any final deal is still uncertain with clear divisions among those who voted to leave and a lack of support among the Government’s members of parliament for the adopted ‘Chequers proposals’. It is therefore clear that there is uncertainty whether any final deal will have wholehearted support and can be carried through Parliament.

 

In recent months a campaign has developed which proposes a People’s Vote on any final deal (or no deal), with the alternative to remain in the EU, to ensure that the path taken has majority support among the electorate.

 

A number of letters/emails have been received by members asking the Council to support this initiative.

 

The Council notes that:

 

(i)    The Governor of the Bank of England has stated that the average household income in Britain is now £900 lower than that anticipated if the decision to leave the EU had not been taken.

 

(ii)    There are a large number of non-UK EU nationals resident in Cambridge whose life, and that of their UK-national families, has been destabilised by uncertainty. Apart from the social impacts, this has resulted in the loss of staff by local businesses and the NHS.

 

(iii)   Due to uncertainty about whether the deal that will be agreed with the EU will achieve a Parliamentary majority, ‘no deal’ appears a very credible outcome. This has been described by Chancellor Hammond as having “large fiscal consequences” and by independent observers as “overwhelmingly negative”.

 

(iv)   All avenues currently being considered by the Government impose increasing delays for goods at our international frontiers and no facilitation would be provided for trade in services which form a major element in the local economy.

 

(v)    Recent opinion poll evidence has suggested an overall trend in public opinion away from support for leaving  the EU and in favour of a vote on the conditions of any departure. A vote on the terms of withdrawal with the option to remain would ensure that we leave, should we do so, with wholehearted support for the actual conditions of withdrawal.

 

(vi)   The anticipated rapidly deteriorating economic situation if Brexit proceeds is likely to accelerate austerity, which has already caused acute problems in providing local authority services and has severely affected local residents, in particular those in social housing or in receipt of benefits.

 

(vii)  Evidence of illegal overspending has been presented (and accepted by the Electoral Commission) and court challenges on the constitutional position are still continuing. A vote on the withdrawal terms would ensure that any decision is accepted as sound by both sides of the argument rather than being fought out in the courts.

 

The Council believes that the interests of its residents would be best protected by a People’s Vote on the terms of leaving the European Union with the possibility of rescinding Article 50 and remaining in the EU.

 

The Council calls on the Government to abandon plans for a hard Brexit and to give Cambridge residents the opportunity to assess the original promises of a seamless Brexit with minimal impact made by the Leave campaign by giving the electorate (including resident European citizens) a vote on whether to accept the proposed withdrawal arrangements or to retain the many benefits local residents currently enjoy by staying in the European Union.

 

The Council should write to our two local MPs calling on them to clearly support a People’s Vote.

 

(viii)  Cambridge voted overwhelmingly to remain in the European
Union, but this was not reflected across the whole of the UK.

 

(ix)  No-one was voting for fewer rights, economic chaos, or risks to jobs, and the Brexit deal being pursued by Theresa May is a threat to jobs, freedom of movement, peace in Northern Ireland, and the NHS.  It is also a threat to Cambridge and our residents, the city’s Universities, health and social care locally, and our jobs and community.

 

(x)  Non-UK EU citizens who moved to the UK and are long settled in Cambridge have not yet received the full assurances they need. Similarly, the rights of Cambridge residents now living and working elsewhere in the EU need the same protections they have now.

(xi)  A “no deal Brexit” should be rejected as a viable option by Parliament.

 

This council supports the actions of the Leader of the Opposition Jeremy Corbyn MP, and will continue to campaign, that:

·  Should Parliament vote down a Tory Brexit or the talks end in no-deal, this would constitute a loss of confidence in the government, and that an immediate General Election should follow.

·  If a general election does not follow, all options remain on the table, including the option of a public vote.
If the government is confident in negotiating a deal that working people, our economy and communities will benefit from, they should not be afraid to put that deal to the public, so that all options are on the table including the option to remain in the European Union.”

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 22 votes to 12.

 

Resolved by (23 votes to 0) to:

 

The Council notes that:

 

(i)    The Governor of the Bank of England has stated that the average household income in Britain is now £900 lower than that anticipated if the decision to leave the EU had not been taken.

 

(ii)    There are a large number of non-UK EU nationals resident in Cambridge whose life, and that of their UK-national families, has been destabilised by uncertainty. Apart from the social impacts, this has resulted in the loss of staff by local businesses and the NHS.

 

(iii)   Due to uncertainty about whether the deal that will be agreed with the EU will achieve a Parliamentary majority, ‘no deal’ appears a very credible outcome. This has been described by Chancellor Hammond as having “large fiscal consequences” and by independent observers as “overwhelmingly negative”.

 

(iv)   All avenues currently being considered by the Government impose increasing delays for goods at our international frontiers and no facilitation would be provided for trade in services which form a major element in the local economy.

 

(v)    Recent opinion poll evidence has suggested an overall trend in public opinion away from support for leaving  the EU and in favour of a vote on the conditions of any departure. A vote on the terms of withdrawal with the option to remain would ensure that we leave, should we do so, with wholehearted support for the actual conditions of withdrawal.

 

(vi)   The anticipated rapidly deteriorating economic situation if Brexit proceeds is likely to accelerate austerity, which has already caused acute problems in providing local authority services and has severely affected local residents, in particular those in social housing or in receipt of benefits.

 

(vii)  Evidence of illegal overspending has been presented (and accepted by the Electoral Commission) and court challenges on the constitutional position are still continuing. A vote on the withdrawal terms would ensure that any decision is accepted as sound by both sides of the argument rather than being fought out in the courts.

(viii)  Cambridge voted overwhelmingly to remain in the European
Union, but this was not reflected across the whole of the UK.

 

(ix)  No-one was voting for fewer rights, economic chaos, or risks to jobs, and the Brexit deal being pursued by Theresa May is a threat to jobs, freedom of movement, peace in Northern Ireland, and the NHS.  It is also a threat to Cambridge and our residents, the city’s Universities, health and social care locally, and our jobs and community.

 

(x)  Non-UK EU citizens who moved to the UK and are long settled in Cambridge have not yet received the full assurances they need. Similarly, the rights of Cambridge residents now living and working elsewhere in the EU need the same protections they have now.

(xi)  A “no deal Brexit” should be rejected as a viable option by Parliament.

 

This council supports the actions of the Leader of the Opposition Jeremy Corbyn MP, and will continue to campaign, that:

·  Should Parliament vote down a Tory Brexit or the talks end in no-deal, this would constitute a loss of confidence in the government, and that an immediate General Election should follow.

·  If a general election does not follow, all options remain on the table, including the option of a public vote.
If the government is confident in negotiating a deal that working people, our economy and communities will benefit from, they should not be afraid to put that deal to the public, so that all options are on the table including the option to remain in the European Union.”

 

18/58/CNLc

Councillor Payne - Ask for Angela motion

Council welcomes the “Ask for Angela” campaign, launched in Cambridgeshire last year by the Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership and the Police Constabulary as a strategy to aid both women and men in pubs and bars whose date goes seriously wrong. In particular it recognises the work done in Cambridge by Cambridge Business Against Crime and Pubwatch to engage and train staff of venues in the city. Noting that that incidence of sexual crime is no different in this area from the country as a whole, yet the campaign has yet to be called on, Council calls on officers to explore means of further boosting targeted public awareness of the campaign, calling on support as appropriate from the Cambridge Community Safety Partnership, the city’s sixth forms, its two universities and Cambridge Regional College; in addition to offer support to the provision of a web-based listing of venues signed up to the scheme to provide assurance to people deciding where to meet.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Payne proposed and Councilllor O’Connell seconded the following motion:

 

Council welcomes the “Ask for Angela” campaign, launched in Cambridgeshire last year by the Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership and the Police Constabulary as a strategy to aid both women and men in pubs and bars whose date goes seriously wrong. In particular it recognises the work done in Cambridge by Cambridge Business Against Crime and Pubwatch to engage and train staff of venues in the city. Noting that that incidence of sexual crime is no different in this area from the country as a whole, yet the campaign has yet to be called on, Council calls on officers to explore means of further boosting targeted public awareness of the campaign, calling on support as appropriate from the Cambridge Community Safety Partnership, the city’s sixth forms, its two universities and Cambridge Regional College; in addition to offer support to the provision of a web-based listing of venues signed up to the scheme to provide assurance to people deciding where to meet.

 

Councillor Massey proposed and Councillor Barnett seconded the following amendment to motion (deleted text struck through and additional text underlined):

 

Council welcomes the “Ask for Angela” campaign, launched in Cambridgeshire last year by the Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership and the Police Constabulary as a strategy to aid both women and men in pubs and bars whose date goes seriously wrong. In particular it recognises with thanks the work done in Cambridge by Cambridge Business Against Crime and Pubwatch to engage and train staff of venues in the city, and the work of council officers in promoting and encouraging the campaign in partnership with CAMBAC and the Community Safety Partnership.

 

Council notes that for the campaign to be successful there needs to be clear awareness of it amongst its target audience. It further notes that this target audience includes sixth form, college and university students, as well as other local residents and workers. Council notes that officers are already in talks with partners to explore means of promoting this campaign in ways which do not undermine the need for discretion which is fundamental to the campaign, and gives its full support to this approach. It also calls upon local bars and clubs not already signed up to this excellent initiative to give serious consideration to doing so.

 

Noting that that incidence of sexual crime is no different in this area from the country as a whole, yet the campaign has yet to be called on, Council calls on officers to explore means of further boosting targeted public awareness of the campaign, calling on support as appropriate from the Cambridge Community Safety Partnership, the city’s sixth forms, its two universities and Cambridge Regional College; in addition to offer support to the provision of a web-based listing of venues signed up to the scheme to provide assurance to people deciding where to meet.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 20 votes to 11.

 

Resolved (by 30 votes to 0):

 

Council welcomes the “Ask for Angela” campaign, launched in Cambridgeshire last year by the Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Partnership and the Police Constabulary as a strategy to aid both women and men in pubs and bars whose date goes seriously wrong. In particular it recognises with thanks the work done in Cambridge by Cambridge Business Against Crime and Pubwatch to engage and train staff of venues in the city, and the work of council officers in promoting and encouraging the campaign in partnership with CAMBAC and the Community Safety Partnership.

 

Council notes that for the campaign to be successful there needs to be clear awareness of it amongst its target audience. It further notes that this target audience includes sixth form, college and university students, as well as other local residents and workers. Council notes that officers are already in talks with partners to explore means of promoting this campaign in ways which do not undermine the need for discretion which is fundamental to the campaign, and gives its full support to this approach. It also calls upon local bars and clubs not already signed up to this excellent initiative to give serious consideration to doing so.

 

18/58/CNLd

Councillor Smith - Motion on EU Negotiations

This council notes that

·  Cambridge voted overwhelmingly to remain in the European Union, but this was not reflected across the whole of the UK.

·  No-one was voting for fewer rights, economic chaos, or risks to jobs, and the Brexit deal being pursued by Theresa May is a threat to jobs, freedom of movement, peace in Northern Ireland, and the NHS.  It is also a threat to Cambridge and our residents, the city’s Universities, health and social care locally, and our jobs and community.

·  Non-UK EU citizens who moved to the UK and are long settled in Cambridge have not yet received the full assurances they need. Similarly, the rights of Cambridge residents now living and working elsewhere in the EU need the same protections they have now.

·  A “no deal Brexit” should be rejected as a viable option by Parliament.

 

This council believes, and will continue to campaign, that:

·  Should Parliament vote down a Tory Brexit or the talks end in no-deal, this would constitute a loss of confidence in the government, and that an immediate General Election should follow.

·  If a general election does not follow, all options remain on the table, including the option of a public vote.
If the government is confident in negotiating a deal that working people, our economy and communities will benefit from, they should not be afraid to put that deal to the public.

 

Minutes:

This motion was withdrawn under Council Procedure Rule 27, which provides that a motion may be withdrawn by the mover of the motion with the consent of the seconder and of the Council which shall be signified without discussion.

18/58/CNLe

Councillor Bick - Councillors who break their connection with their council area

Noting the current experience of an elected member continuing in office despite neither living nor working in the city, Council calls for a change in national legislation so that any councillor who during his or her term of office ceases to meet the minimum qualifying conditions required for initially standing for election, excluding continued service as a councillor, would after 6 months be considered to have vacated their seat, allowing a by-election to be called. Council requests the Leader to write to the Secretary of State and Local Government Association seeking their support for this change.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Bick proposed and Councillor O’Connell seconded the following motion:

 

Noting the current experience of an elected member continuing in office despite neither living nor working in the city, Council calls for a change in national legislation so that any councillor who during his or her term of office ceases to meet the minimum qualifying conditions required for initially standing for election, excluding continued service as a councillor, would after 6 months be considered to have vacated their seat, allowing a by-election to be called. Council requests the Leader to write to the Secretary of State and Local Government Association seeking their support for this change.

 

Councillor Herbert proposed and Councillor Blencowe seconded the following amendment to motion (additional text underlined)

 

Noting the current experience of an elected member continuing in office despite neither living nor working in the city, Council calls for a change in national legislation so that any councillor who during his or her term of office ceases to meet the minimum qualifying conditions required for initially standing for election, excluding continued service as a councillor, but then moving to live more than a normal maximum commuting distance of 50 miles from the boundary of their council area would after 6 months be considered to have vacated their seat, allowing a by-election to be called. Council requests the Leader to write to the Secretary of State and Local Government Association seeking their support for this change.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 20 votes to 11.

 

Resolved (unanimously):

 

Noting the current experience of an elected member continuing in office despite neither living nor working in the city, Council calls for a change in national legislation so that any councillor who during his or her term of office ceases to meet the minimum qualifying conditions required for initially standing for election, excluding continued service as a councillor, but then moving to live more than a normal maximum commuting distance of 50 miles from the boundary of their council area would after 6 months be considered to have vacated their seat, allowing a by-election to be called. Council requests the Leader to write to the Secretary of State and Local Government Association seeking their support for this change.

 

18/58/CNLf

Councillor Gillespie - Fur Free Market motion

This Council notes that:

·  The United Kingdom has outlawed the farming of animals for their fur on ethical grounds since 2000 and that the use of one of the most common traps used to catch animals for their fur has been illegal for many years.

·  Nonetheless fur products are imported from overseas nations, particularly China, where such bans do not operate and where there is virtually no animal welfare legislation in force.

·  Real fur comes from animals raised in deplorable conditions or trapped in the wild and killed inhumanely.

·  Regrettably these products are often found for sale on public markets in the UK and customers can inadvertently buy them thinking them to be made of imitation fur.

 

Accordingly Council resolves to:

·  Prohibit the sale of any product wholly or partially made with real animal fur on Council owned land and at Council run or Council leased markets. This ban to cover such items as fur coats, vintage fur, fur shawls, garments with fur trim, fur pompom hats, and fur accessories and trinkets.

·  Support the Fur Free Markets campaign of the animal welfare charity, Respect for Animals, the UK’s leading anti-fur organisation, by:

-   Becoming a signatory to the initiative.

-   Seeking the advice and assistance of the charity in the enforcement of this ban.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Gillespie proposed and Councillor Nethsingha seconded the following motion:

 

This Council notes that:

·  The United Kingdom has outlawed the farming of animals for their fur on ethical grounds since 2000 and that the use of one of the most common traps used to catch animals for their fur has been illegal for many years.

·  Nonetheless fur products are imported from overseas nations, particularly China, where such bans do not operate and where there is virtually no animal welfare legislation in force.

·  Real fur comes from animals raised in deplorable conditions or trapped in the wild and killed inhumanely.

·  Regrettably these products are often found for sale on public markets in the UK and customers can inadvertently buy them thinking them to be made of imitation fur.

 

Accordingly Council resolves to:

·  Prohibit the sale of any product wholly or partially made with real animal fur on Council owned land and at Council run or Council leased markets. This ban to cover such items as fur coats, vintage fur, fur shawls, garments with fur trim, fur pompom hats, and fur accessories and trinkets.

·  Support the Fur Free Markets campaign of the animal welfare charity, Respect for Animals, the UK’s leading anti-fur organisation, by:

-   Becoming a signatory to the initiative.

-   Seeking the advice and assistance of the charity in the enforcement of this ban.

 

Councillor Moore proposed and Councillor Sheil seconded the following amendment to motion (additional text underlined and deleted text struck through)

 

This Council notes that:

·  The United Kingdom has outlawed the farming of animals for their fur on ethical grounds since 2000 and that the use of one of the most common traps used to catch animals for their fur has been illegal for many years.

·  Nonetheless fur products are imported from overseas nations, particularly China, where such bans do not operate and where there is virtually no animal welfare legislation in force.

·  Real fur comes from animals raised in deplorable conditions or trapped in the wild and killed inhumanely.

·  Regrettably these products are often found for sale on public markets in the UK and customers can inadvertently buy them thinking them to be made of imitation fur.

 

Accordingly Council resolves toask the Executive Councillor to investigate the legalities of:

 

·  Prohibiting the sale of any product wholly or partially made with real animal fur on Council owned land and at Council run or Council leased markets. This ban to cover such items as fur coats, vintage fur, fur shawls, garments with fur trim, fur pompom hats, and fur accessories and trinkets.

 

And to look into

 

·  Supporting the Fur Free Markets campaign of the animal welfare charity, Respect for Animals, the UK’s leading anti-fur organisation, by and

-  Becoming a signatory to the initiative.

-   Seeking the advice and assistance of the charity in the enforcement of this ban.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried unanimously.

 

Resolved (unanimously):

 

 This Council notes that:

·  The United Kingdom has outlawed the farming of animals for their fur on ethical grounds since 2000 and that the use of one of the most common traps used to catch animals for their fur has been illegal for many years.

·  Nonetheless fur products are imported from overseas nations, where such bans do not operate and where there is virtually no animal welfare legislation in force.

·  Real fur comes from animals raised in deplorable conditions or trapped in the wild and killed inhumanely.

·  Regrettably these products are often found for sale on public markets in the UK and customers can inadvertently buy them thinking them to be made of imitation fur.

 

Accordingly Council resolves toask the executive councillor to investigate the legalities of:

 

·  Prohibiting the sale of any product wholly or partially made with real animal fur on Council owned land and at Council run or Council leased markets. This ban to cover such items as fur coats, vintage fur, fur shawls, garments with fur trim, fur pompom hats, and fur accessories and trinkets.

 

And to look into

 

·  Supporting the Fur Free Markets campaign of the animal welfare charity, Respect for Animals, the UK’s leading anti-fur organisation, and

-  Becoming a signatory to the initiative.

 

18/59/CNL

Written questions

No discussion will take place on this item. Members will be asked to note the written questions and answers document as circulated around the Chamber.

 

Minutes:

Members were asked to note the written questions and answers contained in the Information Pack that had been circulated round the Council Chamber.