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Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, The Guildhall, Market Square, Cambridge, CB2 3QJ. View directions

Contact: Democratic Services  Committee Manager

Link: Video recording of the meeting

Items
No. Item

18/25/CNL

To Elect a Mayor for the Municipal Year 2018/19

Minutes:

Councillor Price proposed and Councillor Dalzell seconded the nomination of Councillor Nigel Gawthrope as Mayor for the Municipal Year 2018/19.

 

Resolved (unanimously) that:

 

i.  Councillor Nigel Gawthrope be elected for the Municipal Year 2018/19.

 

Councillor Gawthrope then made the statutory declaration of acceptance of the Office of Mayor.

 

18/26/CNL

To Elect a Deputy Mayor for the Municipal Year 2018/19

Minutes:

Councillor Moore proposed and Councillor Cantrill seconded the nomination of Councillor Gerri Bird as Deputy Mayor for the Municipal Year 2018/19.

 

Resolved that:

 

i.  Councillor Gerri Bird be elected Deputy Mayor for the Municipal Year 2018/19.

 

Councillor Bird then made the statutory declaration of acceptance of the Office of Deputy Mayor.

 

18/27/CNL

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 19 April 2018 pdf icon PDF 286 KB

Minutes:

The minutes of 19 April 2018 were confirmed as a correct record and signed by the Mayor.

 

18/28/CNL

To Note the Returning Officer's Report that the following have been Elected to the Office of Councillor

·  Abbey: Nicky Massey

·  Arbury: Patrick Sheil

·  Castle: Cheney-Anne Payne

·  Cherry Hinton: Russ McPherson

·  Coleridge: Lewis Herbert

·  East Chesterton: Carla McQueen

·  East Chesterton: Baiju Thittala

·  King’s Hedges: Martin Smart

·  Market: Anthony Martinelli

·  Newnham: Rod Cantrill

·  Petersfield: Ann Sinnott

·  Queen Edith’s: Colin McGerty

·  Romsey: Dave Baigent

·  Trumpington: Katie Thornburrow

·  West Chesterton: Jamie Dalzell

Minutes:

It was noted the following had been elected to the Office of Councillor:

·  Abbey: Nicky Massey

·  Arbury: Patrick Sheil

·  Castle: Cheney-Anne Payne

·  Cherry Hinton: Russ McPherson

·  Coleridge: Lewis Herbert

·  East Chesterton: Carla McQueen

·  East Chesterton: Baiju Thittala

·  King’s Hedges: Martin Smart

·  Market: Anthony Martinelli

·  Newnham: Rod Cantrill

·  Petersfield: Ann Sinnott

·  Queen Edith’s: Colin McGerty

·  Romsey: Dave Baigent

·  Trumpington: Katie Thornburrow

·  West Chesterton: Jamie Dalzell

 

18/29/CNL

To Note the Appointment of the Mayor's Chaplain for the Ensuing Year

Minutes:

The Council noted the appointment of Rev’d David Maher as the Mayor’s Chaplain for the Municipal Year 2018/19.

 

18/30/CNL

To Pass a Resolution of Thanks to the Outgoing Mayor

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously), on the proposal of Councillor Page-Croft, seconded by Councillor Herbert that:

 

i. The Council expressed its appreciation of the manner in which the duties of Mayor and Mayoress were discharged by Councillor George Pippas and Anastasia Pippas, during their period of office and that the Common Seal be affixed to a copy of this resolution for presentation at the next Council meeting.

 

18/31/CNL

Mayor's announcements

Minutes:

Apologies

Apologies were received from Councillor Payne and apologies for lateness were received from Councillor Smart. 

 

Civic Church Service

The Mott Sermon would be preached at Holy Trinity Church this coming Sunday, 27 May at 9.30 a.m.

 

Proclamation of Midsummer Fair

The Proclamation of Midsummer Fair was scheduled to take place on Wednesday, 20 June, and details have been circulated.

 

Mayor’s Day Out

The Mayor confirmed that the Mayor’s Day Out would take place on Tuesday 14 August and asked that if anyone would like to help to let Penny Jackson know who would inform the Cambridge Live team.

18/32/CNL

To Elect from among the Members of the Council Four Bailiffs of the City for the Municipal Year 2018/19

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

Appoint Councillors Dryden, McPherson, Pippas and Page-Croft Bailiffs of the City for the Municipal Year 2018/19.

 

18/33/CNL

To consider the recommendation of the Executive for Adoption

18/33/CNLa

Council Appointments to the Conservators of the River Cam (Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces) pdf icon PDF 72 KB

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

Appoint Councillors Hart and Sinnott to the Conservators of the River Cam.

18/34/CNL

To consider the recommendations of Committees for adoption

18/34/CNLa

Civic Affairs: Nominations for Committees for the Municipal Year 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 273 KB

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

  i.  Agree the number and size of committees and membership of committees as listed below:

 

Ordinary Committee

 

 

Environment and Community Scrutiny Committee 10 (6 Labour + 3 Lib Dem + 1I/G)

Smart, Bird, Massey, Sheil, Barnett, Thittala

 

O’Connell, McGerty, Martinelli

 

Gillespie

 

Alternates - Sargeant, O’Reilly, Gehring, Nethsingha

 

Planning and Transport Scrutiny Committee  8 (5 Labour + 2 Lib Dem + 1I/G)

Sargeant, Smart, Baigent, Thornburrow, McQueen

 

Bick, Payne

 

Hipkin

 

Alternates – Massey, Sinnott, Dalzell, Gillespie

 

Housing Scrutiny Committee 8 (5 Labour + 3 Lib Dem)

Todd-Jones, Bird, Thittala, Thornburrow, Sheil

 

Cantrill, Payne, McGerty

 

Alternates – Barnett, Sinnott, Page-Croft

 

Strategy and Resources Scrutiny Committee 6 (4 Labour + 2 Lib Dem)

Barnett, Baigent, Sargeant, Sinnott

 

Bick, Dalzell

 

Alternates – Massey, Thornburrow, Cantrill

 

Civic Affairs Committee 6 (4 Labour + 2 Lib Dem)

McPherson, Benstead, Gawthrope, Robertson,

 

O’Connell, Dalzell

 

Alternate – Sargeant, Martinelli

 

Employment (Senior Officer) Committee 6 (4 Labour +2 Lib Dem)

Blencowe, Hart, Herbert, Price

 

Bick, Nethsingha

 

Licensing Committee 12 (8 Labour+ 4 Lib Dem)

Bird, Thittala, Moore, Gawthrope, Benstead, McPherson, Sargeant, McQueen

 

Pippas, Gehring, Holt, Page-Croft

 

Alternates – Johnson

 

Planning Committee10 (6 Labour+ 3 Lib Dem + 1 I/G)

Smart, Blencowe, McQueen, Hart, Sinnott, Thornburrow

 

Tunnacliffe, Nethsingha, Page-Croft.

 

Hipkin

 

Alternates – Baigent, Holt, Gillespie

 

Cambridge City Joint Area Committee (with County Council) 6 (4 Labour + 2  Lib Dem )

Sargeant, Bird, Blencowe, Robertson

 

Gehring, Holt

 

Alternates - Smart, Payne

 

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Combined Authority - 1 seat

Herbert, Leader of the Council 

 

Alternate - Price

 

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Combined Authority Overview and Scrutiny Committee 1 Labour + 1 Lib Dem

Sargeant

 

Gehring

 

Alternates – Thornburrow, Holt

 

 

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Audit and Governance Committee 1 Labour + one alternate

Robertson

 

Alternate – Ashton

 

Greater Cambridge Partnership Joint Assembly 3 (2 Labour + 1 Lib Dem)

Price, Massey,

 

Bick

 

Joint Development Control Committee - Cambridge Fringes 6 (4 Labour+ 2 Lib Dem)

Blencowe, Smart, Bird, Price

 

Tunnacliffe, Page-Croft

 

Alternates- Thornburrow, Sargeant, Holt, Nethsingha

 

 

18/34/CNLb

Civic Affairs: Nominations for Committees Chairs and Vice-Chairs Municipal Year 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 252 KB

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

Approve the Nominations for Committee Chairs and Vice-Chairs for Municipal Year 2018/19.

 

 

Chair

Vice Chair

Environment and Community Services

Smart

Bird

Planning and Transport

Sargeant

Smart

Housing

Todd-Jones

Bird

(nb. Tenant/Leaseholder is Chair of Part 1 of the meeting)

Strategy & Resources

Barnett

Baigent

Civic Affairs

McPherson

Benstead

Licensing

Bird

Thittala

Planning

Smart

Blencowe

JDCC

Blencowe as Lead Cllr

 

18/34/CNLc

Civic Affairs: Constitutional Updates pdf icon PDF 512 KB

Minutes:

Resolved (unanimously) to:

 

Approve the changes to the Constitution as set out below:

 

1.  An amendment to the Committee designated as the Crime and Disorder Committee as required under the Police and Justice Act 2006, this will now be the Environment and Community Scrutiny Committee (extract of the amendment to the Constitution detailed below).

 

6.1  Strategy and Resources (Scrutiny) Committee

 

Terms of Reference

1.Overview and scrutiny of the functions for which the Leader (and Executive Councillor for Strategy and Transformation) is responsible.

2.Overview and scrutiny of the functions for which the Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources is responsible.

3.Overview and scrutiny of any functions exercised by the Executive collectively.

4.Overview and scrutiny of any Council functions which fall outside the remit of any other scrutiny committee.

5. As required by Section 19 of the Police and Justice Act 2006 to be the crime and disorder committee with the power to review or scrutinise decisions made by the Council or by the Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership.

6.2  Environment and Community (Scrutiny) Committee

 

Terms of Reference

Overview and scrutiny of the functions for which the Executive Councillors for (i) Communities (ii) Environmental Services and City Centre and (iii) Streets and Open Spaces  are responsible

 

As required by Section 19 of the Police and Justice Act 2006 to be the crime and disorder committee with the power to review or scrutinise decisions made by the Council or by the Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership.

 

2.  Council is requested to note that the following transfer of Executive Councillor responsibilities and clarifications made by the Leader of the Council and to note the Leader’s portfolio is renamed Executive Councillor for Strategy and External Partnerships.

 

 

Proposed Amendments to Part 3 Section 2.3, 2.5 and 2.9 of Constitution, deleted text struckthrough and additional text underlined.

Transfer of responsibilities
- In italics and underlined, to the Executive Councillor for Communities
- In capitals and underlined, to the Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources
- In bold and underlined, clarity on capital responsibility of the Executive Councillor for Housing

2.3 Responsibilities of the Executive Councillor for Strategy and Transformation External Partnerships

2.3.2 The Leader shall have the power to determine which Executive Councillor shall have responsibility for the exercise of executive functions in cases of doubt or in cases for which provision has not been made in the Constitution. Where the Leader decides to lead, or to co-ordinate work with one or more Executive Councillors, or take decisions on a matter within another executive portfolio (e.g. a major project), it will be identified in the Forward Plan.


2.3.3 The development, implementation and monitoring of the Council’s plans, policies and strategies relating to:


corporate objectives, policies and strategies of the Council subject, where necessary, to the approval of the Council and excluding those objectives, policies and strategies which are the responsibility of another Executive Councillor

 

programmes which give direction to, and co-ordinate, the implementation of the Council's corporate policies and priorities,includingDetailed oversight of race equality, disability equality and equal opportunity in service delivery and Council policy

 

the need for, and the development of, new services and policy not within the terms of reference of other Executive Councillors

 

Lead on Business Transformation, working with the Executive Councillor; specific responsibility for leading plans, where notdelegatedotherwise delegated, for new externally facing shared services, trusts, service reviews and joint projects involving other councils and organisationsor taking lead on projects which involve the responsibilities of more than one Executive Councillor.

 

matters falling substantially within the Terms of Reference of more than one other Executive Councillor, where not otherwise delegated.

 

The exercise of the Council’s functions and the delivery of services including

 

Strategy and Partnerships - including the devolution Combined Authority, City Deal, and the expansion of joint working with other councils, the Universities and other partners

Business Transformation – creation of new external shared services, or joint structures including trusts and joint projects with other councils and organisations which involve the responsibilities of more than one other Executive Councillor

All matters concerning national local government associations and corporate projects with Government, including council-wide bids for resources

The giving of any guarantee or incurring of any other commitments not specifically referred elsewhere

The exercise of compulsory purchase powers except where these are allocated to Executive Councillors relating to their portfolio responsibilities.

 

The development, implementation and monitoring of the Council’s plans, policies and strategies relating to:

Data protection and freedom of information.

 

Functions and Services

The exercise of the Council’s functions and the delivery of services in respect of the areas listed in Paragraph 1 including, by way of illustration:

Corporate And Other Services

The Independent Complaints Investigator Service

The Council's emergency planning functions

Democratic Services

Other responsibilities which do not fall within the remit of another Executive Councillor.

 

Civic functions (insofar as these are not within the remit of the Civic Affairs Committee)

Matters relating to the democratic functions of the Council, including

O The mayoralty

o Civic hospitality and town twinning and other partnerships with local authorities overseas

 

Relationships, including the appointment or nomination of Council representatives, with outside organisations not directly related to the programme area of any committee or other Executive Councillor.


Community Safety Including the Community Safety Partnership, work with the police and the CCTV system and, working with the Leader, work with Cambridge police, the Police and Crime Commissioner and the Council’s representative on the Police and Crime Panel.


CONFIRM EXECUTIVE COUNCILLOR FOR FINANCE AND RESOURCES
text on Constitution p40

Responsibility for all capital projects etc.
- except responsibility for housing development on council sites that includes significant new council housing or affordable housing


BUT AMEND

Management of all land and buildings held by the Council, except for:

 

o property in use for specific operational purposes which fall within the responsibility of another Executive Councillor

o those parts of council sites developed for housing including new council housing, and dwellings held within the Housing Revenue Account  and land held by the Council for housing purposes used for or in connection with the provision of facilities or amenities for local tenants or residents, which shall be the responsibility of the Executive Councillor for Housing.

 

 

A clean version of Part 3 Section 2.3, 2.5 and 2.9 with amendments incorporated is detailed below.

2.3  The Leader and Executive Councillor for Strategy and External Partnerships

 

2.3.1The Leader shall be responsible for exercising functions on behalf of the Executive in the circumstances set out in the Council’s Executive Procedure Rules in Part 4 of this Constitution.

 

2.3.2The Leader shall have the power to determine which Executive Councillor shall have responsibility for the exercise of executive functions in cases of doubt or in cases for which provision has not been made in the Constitution. Where the Leader decides to lead, or to co-ordinate work with one or more Executive Councillors, or take decisions on a matter within another executive portfolio (e.g. a major project), it will be identified in the Forward Plan.

 

2.3.3The development, implementation and monitoring of the Council’s plans, policies and strategies relating to:

·  corporate objectives, policies and strategies of the Council subject, where necessary, to the approval of the Council and excluding those objectives, policies and strategies which are the responsibility of another Executive Councillor

·  programmes which give direction to, and co-ordinate, the  implementation of the Council's corporate policies and priorities.

·  the need for, and the development of, new services and policy not within the terms of reference of other Executive Councillors

·  matters falling substantially within the Terms of Reference of more than one other Executive Councillor, where not otherwise delegated.

 

The exercise of the Council’s functions and the delivery of services including

 

·  Strategy and Partnerships - including the devolution Combined Authority, City Deal, and the expansion of joint working with other councils, the Universities and other partners

·  All matters concerning national local government associations and corporate projects with Government, including council-wide bids for resources

·  The giving of any guarantee or incurring of any other commitments not specifically referred elsewhere

·  The exercise of compulsory purchase powers except where these are allocated to Executive Councillors relating to their portfolio responsibilities.

 

The development, implementation and monitoring of the Council’s plans, policies and strategies relating to:

 

·  Data protection and freedom of information.

 

Functions and Services

The exercise of the Council’s functions and the delivery of services in respect of the areas listed in Paragraph 1 including, by way of illustration:

 

Corporate And Other Services

 

·  The Independent Complaints Investigator Service

·  The Council's emergency planning functions

·  Democratic Services

·  Other responsibilities which do not fall within the remit of another Executive Councillor.

 

Civic functions (insofar as these are not within the remit of the Civic Affairs Committee)

 

·  Matters relating to the democratic functions of the Council, including

o  The mayoralty

o  Civic hospitality and town twinning and other partnerships with local authorities overseas

 

Relationships, including the appointment or nomination of Council representatives, with outside organisations not directly related to the programme area of any committee or other Executive Council 

2.4  Deputy Leader

 

2.4.1The responsibilities of the Deputy Leader are set out in the Executive Procedure Rules in Part 4 of this Constitution.

 

2.5  Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources

 

2.5.1Strategic control of the use of the financial resources of the Council, (subject to the necessary financial approvals of the Council)

Treasury Management including for the Housing Revenue Account

Insurance and banking services

The approval of Council contributions towards projects being funded from the National Lottery

Supervision of the borrowing of money and management of the Council's cash flow
Management of other income and specific reserves
Other detailed financial management matters, including  the writing off of debts except where the responsibility of the Executive Councillor for Housing

Collection and management of Council Tax, National Non-Domestic Rates and Housing Benefit.

 

Strategic information technology issues, information technology projects which either have implications for the Council as a whole or which fall significantly within the remit of more than one Executive Councillor.

 

·  corporate implementation of improvements and efficiency reviews, and the development and monitoring of core performance indicators and targets

·  Business Transformation-internal service reviews and responsibility for leading plans, where not otherwise delegated, for new externally facing shared services, trusts , service reviews and joint projects involving other councils and organisations. The creation of new external shared services, or joint structures including trusts and joint projects with other councils and organisations which involve the responsibilities of more than one other Executive Councillor

·  Corporate and support services as exemplified under “Functions and Services” below.

·  Procurement (at a strategic level - oversight of individual procurement exercises will remain with the portfolio-holder for the relevant service area).

·  The policy and management of moorings

·  Climate Change Policy

 

Trading Services

·  Council strategy to expand trading activities and additional income generation opportunities, including responsibility for those which do not fall within the remit of another Executive Councillor

 

Customer Services and ICT

 

·  Delivery of quality customer services and the customer access centre

·  Corporate telephony and IT systems to support joined up customer service delivery.

·  The delivery of front line services to Council customers through the Council’s reception areas and telephone services

·  Council’s evolving digital strategy and the benefits it will deliver for residents, and also to staff in helping them do their jobs better and more easily

 

Property Matters

 

·  Leadership on corporate and cross-portfolio major capital projects and oversight of the council’s overall capital programme, including the development, redevelopment, change of use or other major change to land or property owned by the Council considered by the Chief Executive to be major, significant or sensitive in terms of the Council's policies and priorities.

·  Any realisation of assets programme which may be considered necessary to generate capital receipts for the Council.

·  The approval of any proposal to re-allocate land between functions and any formal appropriation of land or property from one purpose to another.

·  Management of all land and buildings held by the Council, except for:

 

o  property in use for specific operational purposes which fall within the responsibility of another Executive Councillor

o  those parts of council sites developed for housing including new council housing, and dwellings held within the Housing Revenue Account  and land held by the Council for housing purposes used for or in connection with the provision of facilities or amenities for local tenants or residents, which shall be the responsibility of the Executive Councillor for Housing.

·  The acquisition (by purchase or lease) of property by the Council.

·  Management of  the Council's office accommodation

·  The Council's Land Charges service.

 

Shared Services and Service Reviews, and Employee and Management Matters 

 

To be responsible for:


- corporate service reviews and other efficiency and effectiveness reviews which involve the responsibilities of more than one other Executive Councillor, or have not been otherwise delegated.

- the performance of corporate and other shared services in meeting financial performance objectives in business plan, except that responsibility for operational matters in relation to non-corporate shared services shall be the responsibility of the appropriate other Executive Councillor.

To establish, monitor and ensure funding for Council-wide employment and training and apprenticeship policies and delivery

 

·  To comply with all relevant employment legislation and the Council's corporate strategy, policies and objectives.

·  To exercise strategic control of, and agree policies for, the use of the staffing, property and information technology resources of the Council.

·  To co-ordinate and monitor the arrangements for employee Health and Safety at Work

·  To oversee the provision of professional and central support services, including:

o  Corporate human resources support and information including training

o  Financial services

o  Legal services.


The relevant exercise of compulsory purchase powers.

2.9  Executive Councillor for Communities

 

2.9.1Plans, policies and strategies

 

The development, implementation and monitoring of the Council’s plans, policies and strategies relating to:

 

·  The local welfare and community development needs of all neighbourhoods throughout the City.

·  The provision, promotion and development of policies and programmes to provide children and young people to play and participate in community life, including providing direction and advice to other committees of the Council in pursuance of these aims; the provision and promotion of leisure, sporting, artistic and cultural activities

·  Anti-poverty initiatives and the Sharing Prosperity Fund, including the powers and duties of the Council in respect of issues relating to tackling inequality and the provision of opportunities for individuals and communities in the City to overcome disadvantage

·  The provision and promotion of advice relating to citizens’ legal rights and responsibilities, social security benefits, money management , employment and immigration

·  Supporting the Leader in the delivery of Equalities initiatives, and measures to tackle discrimination.

·  Detailed oversight of race equality, disability equality and equal opportunity in service delivery and Council policy

 

Functions and Services

 

The exercise of the Council’s functions and the delivery of services including

 

·  The powers and duties of the Council in respect of children's activities and youth facilities 

·  Community strategy including the powers and duties of the Council in respect of opportunities for individuals and communities in the City including:

o  education and self-development

o  play programmes

o  artistic, cultural, sporting and leisure activities and entertainments

o  the provision, maintenance and management of places of public entertainment, sport and recreation (including the Guildhall Halls)

o  council owned or operated community facilities

o  museums and art galleries

o  the Council’s responsibilities for public health, working with the county council and health services.

o  health promotion

·  Community Safety Including the Community Safety Partnership, work with the police and the CCTV system and, working with the Leader, work with Cambridge police, the Police and Crime Commissioner and the Council’s representative on the Police and Crime Panel.

 

Progressing the objectives set out in this section by:

 

·  direct provision

·  grant aid and other  financial assistance  to voluntary sector and other agencies

·  partnership,  joint work and liaison  with  public, private or voluntary sector organisations, including community and joint  use agreements,  community primary school agreements and  support for national lottery projects

·  regenerating and encouraging the development of community life and enabling local  communities to take action on their own behalf 

·  giving advice and guidance to other Executive Councillors and committees of the Council on community engagement addressing, in particular, the needs of those experiencing social or economic inequality

·  advocacy.

 

The relevant exercise of compulsory purchase powers.

 

18/35/CNL

Annual Statements pdf icon PDF 228 KB

Group Leaders will each have the opportunity to speak for not more than 15 minutes on their Group’s priorities for action and objectives for the forthcoming municipal year in the following order:

 

Councillor Herbert

Councillor Bick

Councillor Hipkin

 

Annual Statement of the Labour Group is appended.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Herbert spoke to a written Annual Statement on the Labour Group’s priorities for the forthcoming Municipal Year, which had been appended to the agenda for the meeting.

 

Councillor Bick spoke to a written Annual Statement on the Liberal Democrat Group’s priorities for the forthcoming Municipal Year, which had been appended to the information pack for the meeting.

 

Councillor Hipkin gave an oral Annual Statement on the Independent/Green Group’s priorities for the forthcoming Municipal Year.

18/36/CNL

Adoption of Policies and Priorities

The scheme for Annual Statements provides that the Statement of the Leader of the largest group on the Council shall be deemed to be a motion for adoption. It may therefore be debated and amendments proposed after which it shall be put to the vote and, if carried, shall be adopted as Council policy for the municipal year. The Council will therefore consider the Annual Statement of the Labour Group as a motion for adoption.

 

If the adopted Annual Statement contains proposals which fall outside of the Council’s budgetary or policy framework, the proposals shall not be acted upon until there has been a report to the relevant Scrutiny Committee(s) and Executive Councillor(s) in the normal way and approval at a subsequent meeting of the Council.

Minutes:

Under the Scheme for Annual Statements, that of the Labour Group was deemed to be a motion for adoption by the Council.

Resolved (by 26 votes to 0) that:

 

i. The Annual Statement of the Labour Group, as appended to the agenda, be adopted as Council policy for 2018/19.

18/37/CNL

Public questions time

Minutes:

Mrs Diana Minns raised the following points in response to the news that Councillor Adey had moved 400 miles away from Trumpington, the ward which he was elected to represent.

 

  i.  Councillor Adey had informed constituents they could contact him via the internet or Skype but not all residents had access to these methods of communication.

  ii.  Local electors who had an issue they wanted to raise or follow up may be lucky to see Councillor Adey twice yearly at council meetings (in order that he could claim expenses).

  iii.  A recent survey had shown that 40% of Cambridge City Council housing tenants did not have access to the internet.

  iv.  Certain members of society had less access to the internet due to cost.

  v.  She would have liked to ask Councillor Adey if he would resign from his seat but instead would put forward the following question to the Leader of the Council:

·  In light of Councillor Adey moving to Scotland whilst claiming he is still representing the local electors of Trumpington, how can the diverse and large group of electors now secure the full time local representation that they voted for? 

 

The Leader responded:

 

  i.  It was a shame that Councillor Adey was not at the afternoon session of the council meeting as it was not good practice to talk about individuals when they were not present.

  ii.  Councillor Adey was also a County Councillor and in effect had reduced the representation for Trumpington ward at both Councils.

  iii.  Believed it was not possible for a Councillor to respond to a resident’s request to look at an issue instantly from a distance, as they needed to be present to do so.

  iv.  It would be difficult to organise meetings with a day’s notice to respond to residents’ issues.

  v.  Councillor Adey’s move to Scotland had increased the workload for fellow Trumpington councillors who had the largest ward in the city.

  vi.  Trumpington currently had major transport issues and regular attendance at meetings was needed to voice these problems.

 vii.  Suggested that the residents of Trumpington (without party affiliation) assembled a petition to make it clear that this situation was not sustainable. In theory Councillor Adey had a further three year term at the County Council and a two year term at the City Council before his seat would be up for election.

 

The Leader then asked the Council for a show of hands to indicate if they felt that Councillor Adey should resign. All members present raised their hand.

 

Mrs Minns made a supplementary point that an appalling precedent had been set and stated that Councillor Adey was refusing to do the honourable thing and resign.

 

The Leader concluded that the Government needed to review the legislation for the six month rule regarding attendance at meetings; there were Councillors who were not doing their duty and worked around this six month rule.

 

2. Mrs Tina Lynch said the following:

 

  i.  As a resident of Cambridge living in Trumpington ward the situation regarding Councillor Adey moving away was a disgrace.

  ii.  She expressed disappointment that Councillor Adey was not present to listen to the views of Trumpington residents.

  iii.  Agreed that a petition calling for the resignation of Councillor Adey was the right way forward.

 

3. Mr Fung raised the following points regarding an Airbnb that was being advertised as a dwelling for twelve to fourteen adults and two children, next door to his property.

 

  i.  Enquired if the City Council had a policy regarding properties advertised as an Airbnb, rented out without the owner living at the property.

  ii.  Urged the Council not to wait until the problem became an epidemic in Cambridge before there was a solution.

  iii.  Had spoken to planning enforcement officers who said that use of Airbnb, where the owners were not present was growing. 

  iv.  Cities such as Cambridge in Massachusetts, San Francisco and New York had addressed the problems with Airbnb.

  v.  In Newmarket, Cambridgeshire, the problem was being addressed, with the mantra ‘protecting the residents of Newmarket’.

  vi.  The property was constantly being bombarded with minibuses appearing at the front of the house; large groups of people walking past; people sitting on the front wall and individuals trying to open the key safe.

 vii.  The average length of stay at the Airbnb was two to three nights; the cleaners would then follow after departure blocking access to Mr Fung’s garage.

viii.  The bins belonging to the Airbnb were repeatedly left across the garage which caused an obstruction to access to the garage. 

  ix.  At the start of 2017, he had registered a complaint with the Planning Enforcement Department. He had recently received a reply advising that the matter would be investigated and an Enforcement Notice would be served at the beginning of May.

  x.  Further correspondence from the Planning Enforcement Officer had stated that the property would be inspected the second week of May but he hadn’t heard anything further.

  xi.  Planning Enforcement Officers were very difficult to contact and did not respond to numerous voice mails, messages left with colleagues and e-mails.

 xii.  He believed that the Planning Enforcement Team had too much work and not enough officers. 

xiii.  High rents and lack of affordable properties were frequently discussed by all parties of the Council and properties used for Airbnb were part of the problem and forced rental prices up.

 

The Executive for Planning and Transport responded with the following:

 

  i.  He had asked the Planning Enforcement Team to advise why there had been a lack of contact regarding Mr Fung’s complaint.

  ii.  It was possible that the complaint could come to a future Planning Committee; the committee had considered a number of cases concerning Airbnbs.

  iii.  Planning enforcement complaints were dealt with, within the existing framework of guidance, such as the National Planning Policy Framework and Local Plan. If those plans needed to be strengthened it would be for Officers to put forward proposals to the relevant committee. 

  iv.  He acknowledged that the Planning Enforcement Team had been understaffed with a large caseload but this had been rectified.

  v.  He reiterated that he would speak with the relevant officers regarding Mr Fung’s complaint. 

 

Mr Fung asked for confirmation that a policy was in place to address the issues with Airbnb properties when owners were not present. In New York with 46,000 Airbnb properties the price of a rental property had increased by 25%.

 

The Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport replied there was a practical policy for planning enforcement officers to deal with these issues. If a property was being used as a guest house without the relevant permissions then enforcement action could be taken.

 

 

18/38/CNL

To deal with oral questions

Minutes:

1) Councillor Gillespie to the Executive Councillor for Environment and City Centre.

When the procurement process for a new car club provider for the city takes place this year, does the Executive Councillor feel that it's worth some degree of financial outlay to make sure the fleet is all electric?

The Executive Councillor explained there were no current plans to provide financial provision but the Council would continue to support the scheme. The scheme aimed to condense the number of cars in the city, reduce the carbon footprint and reduce parking in the city. It was estimated that every car club vehicle equated to ten privately owned vehicles off the road. However, there needed to be a variety of vehicles to attract more users and be located in different areas for the car club to work. This standard needed to apply across the country. 

The Council supported the principle of increasing the number of electric vehicles in Cambridge and had replaced their own fleet with electric cars and would continue to do so when the opportunity permitted The number of electric vehicle charging points had increased throughout the city and the council had updated the taxi licensing policy to reflect the support and need for electric vehicles.

2) Councillor Cantrill to the Executive Councillor for Housing

Does the Executive Councillor believe that this council’s duty to tenants in its social housing goes beyond its legal obligations?

The Executive Councillor agreed that the Council’s duty to tenants in its social housing did go beyond its legal obligations meeting the Council’s vision of ‘one Cambridge, fair for all’. 

Support was offered from a variety of services; Independent community support services which included welfare and pension checks; Tenancy support of nineteen units at Ditchburn Place for those residents with mental health issues; Resident engagement included an action plan which had been developed from the 2014 staff survey to improve life for tenants and leaseholders.  Two estate champions had been employed who undertook a programme of active engagement. The Council was also going to undertake further work on its domestic violence policy. Significant work around social and digital inclusion was on-going.

3) Councillor Martinelli to the Executive Councillor for Environmental Services

What is the City Council planning to mark National Clean Air Day on 21 June?

The Executive Councillor advised representatives from the Council would be attending a ‘Clear Air’ event in Huntingdon which had been organised by the Public Health Team at Cambridgeshire County Council.  The Council’s Principal Scientific Officer would be presenting on the roles and responsibilities of local authorities across the county. The Council’s updated Air Quality Action Plan would be launched on 21 June, with a public consultation throughout the summer asking for opinions on the Plan. A workshop was in the process of being finalised for residents and stakeholders to meet and share ideas on this matter, with a second event for staff where they could also try out a variety of electric vehicles.

In September, the results of the feasibility study for a clean air zone in the city would be published, leading to further consultation and discussion.

4) Councillor Smart to the Leader

At the last Council meeting on 19 April, Cambridge City Council unanimously supported a motion to reduce the maximum bet on Fixed Odds Betting Terminals to £2. The Council then wrote to the Prime Minister and Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, to the Chair of the Gambling Commission and the Chief Executive of the Gambling Commission and to the two Cambridge MP’s, Daniel Zeichner MP to support him in his resolve to champion this issue, and to Heidi Allen MP to ask her to put pressure on government to call for the maximum bet on Fixed Odds Betting Terminals be set at £2. Did we receive any replies from them?

The Leader replied he had received a response from both Heidi Allen MP (e-mail correspondence) and Daniel Zeichner MP (meeting).  The motion agreed at the previous council meeting had been very timely as the Government had agreed to the maximum bet on Fixed Odds Betting Terminals being set at £2.

5) Councillor Barnett to the Executive Councillor for Communities

What will be the arrangements for this year’s summer programme of events for young people?

The Executive Councillor replied the council’s summer holiday programme; ‘PlayDaze 2018’ would run for 4 weeks from 30th July to 24th August including a range of activities including ‘Big Wednesdays’.  Partners included Cambridge University Museum, Amey and Speechmatic.  The programme would be distributed to all primary school children with information on the Council’s website and copies handed out at the Big Weekend.

The programme was aimed at school age children and their families; actively encouraging parents and carers to play.  Whilst attempting to have a city wide approach to play, the Council’s resources would target those areas where there was a greatest disadvantage and limited play opportunities. 

The Big Wednesdays would be hosted on the Council’s bigger parks where parking was provided and there would be an opportunity to promote the Council’s year round programme including Cambridge Community Scrapstore.

Prior to the summer holidays, project leaders would be working in local neighbourhoods towards a football tournament that would happen on the first day of the summer holidays on Pye Recreation Ground (25th July). 

There would also be a programme of events for May half term which culminated in a city wide event on Parker’s Piece on Friday 1st June to celebrate International Children’s Day.

6) Councillor Nethsingha to the Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources

Please could the Executive Councillor tell me what further action is being taken to reduce the amount of punting, and the serious disruption to pedestrian and cycle traffic which is a consequence of large numbers of people waiting for punt tours taking place from Garret Hostel Bridge? 

The Executive Councillor advised that the Council had sought an injunction in the High Court to stop the use of it’s land along the middle river including Garret Hostel Lane.  The case had been with the High Court on May 9 & 11 and the Council were currently waiting judgement.  If successful, enforcement action could be used to stop the use of Garret Hostel Lane for commercial punt operations.  The Council was aware of the issues of congestion and disruption to both pedestrians and cyclists which was part of the reason for seeking an injunction to stop this use.

7) Councillor McGerty to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport

Does the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport share my dismay at the proposed pre-emptive demolition of two period houses of significant character at 291 and 292 Hills Road and the planning authority’s inability to prevent the rapidly changing character of the Cambridge approaches?

The Executive Councillor responded that the Council had to work within the guidelines and standards set by national processes, the National Planning Policy Framework and the Local Plan. Matters could only be dealt with within the realms of the Council’s responsibility and its limitation.

8) Councillor Gehring to the Executive Councillor for Planning Policy and Transport

Which reform steps for planning decisions will be agreed with South Cambridgeshire District Council as part of the new shared planning service?

The Executive Councillor responded that officer delegation had increased giving a wider responsibility when dealing with planning applications. This would ensure an improved response time.  Staffing restructures had taken place to harmonise the shared service with further work being undertaken.

9) Councillor Dalzell to the Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources

Is the Executive Councillor satisfied with the performance of the city's commercial property portfolio?

The Executive Councillor replied that yes, the performance had been very good, assets had risen by 25% with a 20% rise in income.

10) Councillor Sheil to the Executive Councillor for Streets and Open Spaces

Can the Executive Councillor update us on the measures being taken over the summer to ensure that our public spaces are kept free of litter?

The Executive Councillor stated the Council’s streets and open spaces team worked very hard throughout the year to ensure that the public spaces were kept free of litter, starting very early in the morning. In the summer, staffing levels were increased including the weekends and focus was given to popular outdoor areas without neglecting the rest of the city.  The enforcement team also worked throughout the city seven days a week and in addition offered educational programmes and talks visiting local schools. This summer an anti-litter campaign would be run with various food outlets.

The following Oral Questions were also tabled, but owing to the expiry of the period of time permitted, were not covered during the meeting. The Mayor encouraged a written response to be sent out those Councillors whose questions were not answered:

11) Councillor McQueen to the Executive Councillor for Communities

Can the Executive Councillor for Communities confirm what the Council’s future aspirations are in improving and enhancing swimming facilities in Cambridge?

12) Councillor Bick to the Leader

What does the Leader see as the significance of the finding of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Independent Economic Commission that Greater Cambridge sits at the centre of a local economy that is quite distinct within the broader Cambridgeshire and Peterborough area?

13) Councillor Page-Croft to the Executive Councillor for Housing

How does the Executive Councillor for Housing intend to tackle the problem with the empty properties in the private and public sector?

14) Councillor O’Connell to the Leader

In his capacity as member of the Greater Cambridgeshire Partnership Executive Board, does the Leader share my concerns about imminent dramatic increases in traffic in the South of the city caused by growth of the Biomedical Campus?

15) Councillor Pippas to the Executive Councillor for Finance and Resources

Will the Executive Councillor responsible for the Cambridge City council's customer support service provide us with an update on that team's performance?

 

18/39/CNL

To consider the following notices of motion, notice of which has been given by:

18/39/CNLa

Councillor O'Connell - Council Plastics Motion

This Council welcomes both the efforts of our residents in helping the council recycle materials, and the success of the ‘Plastic Bag Levy’ which has led to an 85% reduction in disposable plastic

bag usage.

 

However, the council notes with concern that a 2015 study indicated that of the 270 million tons of new plastic made each year, 8 million tons ends up washed into the ocean. Plastic which ends up in the River Cam and other watercourses locally contributes to this total, and can release toxic chemicals which harm the health of wildlife.

 

This Council believes that although reducing damage to the environment requires action by everyone, it can take a leading role. It therefore commits to:

 

·  Wherever possible, reduce or eliminate the use of single-use plastics such as bottles, plastic cups, cutlery and drinking straws in council buildings and council-commissioned services, in favour of reusable or environmentally friendly alternatives and to report the initial results of this initiative to the Environment & Community Services Scrutiny Committee in the next 12 months.

·  Write to both our MPs and the Secretary of State for the Environment asking for a 5p charge for disposable coffee cups, including plastic cups, be introduced to follow on from the success of the 5p charge for plastic bags.

·  Include information for the public on reducing plastic waste in both online and written materials including, but not only, on the council website and “Cambridge Matters” magazine.

·  Liaise with local schools to raise awareness of this Council campaign and to encourage local pupils to promote the scheme with their families.

·  To write to major local education establishments, retailers and employers, asking them to adopt similar measures to reduce single-use plastic usage and educate their customers and staff on how they can help.

 

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/347/6223/768?ijkey=BXtBaPzbQgagE&keytype=ref&siteid=sci

 

Minutes:

Councillor O’Connell proposed and Councillor Martinelli seconded the following motion.

 

This Council welcomes both the efforts of our residents in helping the council recycle materials, and the success of the ‘Plastic Bag Levy’ which has led to an 85% reduction in disposable plastic

bag usage.

 

However, the council notes with concern that a 2015 study indicated that of the 270 million tons of new plastic made each year, 8 million tons ends up washed into the ocean. Plastic which ends up in the River Cam and other watercourses locally contributes to this total, and can release toxic chemicals which harm the health of wildlife.

 

This Council believes that although reducing damage to the environment requires action by everyone, it can take a leading role. It therefore commits to:

 

·  Wherever possible, reduce or eliminate the use of single-use plastics such as bottles, plastic cups, cutlery and drinking straws in council buildings and council-commissioned services, in favour of reusable or environmentally friendly alternatives and to report the initial results of this initiative to the Environment & Community Services Scrutiny Committee in the next 12 months.

·  Write to both our MPs and the Secretary of State for the Environment asking for a 5p charge for disposable coffee cups, including plastic cups, be introduced to follow on from the success of the 5p charge for plastic bags.

·  Include information for the public on reducing plastic waste in both online and written materials including, but not only, on the council website and “Cambridge Matters” magazine.

·  Liaise with local schools to raise awareness of this Council campaign and to encourage local pupils to promote the scheme with their families.

·  To write to major local education establishments, retailers and employers, asking them to adopt similar measures to reduce single-use plastic usage and educate their customers and staff on how they can help.

 

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/347/6223/768?ijkey=BXtBaPzbQgagE&keytype=ref&siteid=sci

Councillor Moore proposed and Councillor Thornburrow seconded the following amendments to the motion (additional text underlined and deleted text struck through)

 

“This Council welcomes both the efforts of our residents in helping the council recycle materials, and the success of the ‘Plastic Bag Levy’ which has led to an 85% reduction in disposable plastic bag usage.

 

However, the council notes, with concern, that a 2015 study indicated that of the 270 million tons of new plastic made each year, 8 million tons ends up washed into the ocean.  Plastic which ends up in the River Cam and other watercourses locally contributes to this total, and can release toxic chemicals which harm the health of wildlife.It also notes the growing problem of microfibre pollution caused by the washing of synthetic textiles which has resulted in trillions of tiny threads of plastic being washed into our waterways.  These microfibres have been found in rivers, oceans, in our drinking water and in all forms of sea life, including birds, fish and plankton.

 

This Council believes that to stem the global tide of plastic pollution requires international commitment and regulation so we will write to both of our MPs and the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs asking them to act quickly to protect us and our planet by introducing legislation to prevent unnecessary damage to the environment from avoidable plastics and to reduce the amount of plastic waste. Including but not limited to; although reducing damage to the environment requires action by everyone, it can take a leading role. It therefore commits to:

 

  Wherever possible, reduce or eliminate the use of single-use plastics such as bottles, plastic cups, cutlery and drinking straws in council buildings and council-commissioned services, in favour of reusable or environmentally friendly alternatives and to report the initial results of this initiative to the Environment & Community Services Scrutiny Committee in the next 12 months.

 

  asking for a 5p charge for disposable coffee cups, including plastic cups, be introduced to follow on from the success of the 5p charge for plastic bags.

 

·  Ban disposable coffee cups that can’t be recycled and introduce a 25p charge for disposable cups.

·  To prevent further microfibre pollution of our water and food chain by requiring the washing machine industry to develop filters which prevent microfibres washing into the water cycle, alongside legislation on the textile industry requiring the development of fabrics that shed less fibre in the first place.

·  To introduce a tax on packaging which uses only virgin plastics.

·  To ban disposable plastic glasses and introduce a nationwide deposit-and-return-scheme for plastic glasses such as we have at The Folk Festival.

·  To require all black plastic food trays and plant pots to be dyed using detectable black inks so that they can be fully recycled.

 

This council notes that organisations and individuals also need to take an active role in combating plastic pollution and we believe that we should lead by example which is why we have been looking at reducing our waste across the council. Some of the work that we have done so far includes;

·  As part of the Office Accommodation Strategy, we will be providing glasses and crockery in kitchens together with water dispensers so that staff do not have to use single-use plastic cups in the office. 

·  Encouraging all caterers working on City commissioned events to approach the event in as sustainable a way as possible. 

·  We have updated the Charter Market Regulations (CMR) this year and included the following new regulation: All Traders selling take away hot food or drinks must use cardboard or paper-based cups, trays, dishes or other biodegradable/ re-usable packaging for their products.

·  We are currently working on developing and launching a water bottle refill scheme in Cambridge.

·  We are Members of RECOUP (Recycling Of Used Plastics) a charity and not-for-profit member based organisation, which works in collaboration with all stakeholders to promote, develop, and increase the levels of plastics recycling within the UK.  We are meeting with a RECOUP representative in the coming week to help formulate a residents’ engagement and education campaign to increase the capture of plastics in our recycling bins.

 

This Council will continue our waste reduction work and bring a report to the Environment & Community Services Committee within the next year, which will look at the options for further reducing waste across the council and the city as a whole, making progress towards a Zero Waste strategy. This will include public information campaigns and working with local schools, businesses, organisations and the two universities.

·  Include information for the public on reducing plastic waste in both online and written materials including, but not only, on the council website and “Cambridge Matters” magazine.

·  Liaise with local schools to raise awareness of this Council campaign and to encourage local pupils to promote the scheme with their families.

·  To write to major local education establishments, retailers and employers, asking them to adopt similar measures to reduce single-use plastic usage and educate their customers and staff on how they can help.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried unanimously.

 

Resolved (unanimously) that:

 

“This Council welcomes both the efforts of our residents in helping the council recycle materials, and the success of the ‘Plastic Bag Levy’ which has led to an 85% reduction in disposable plastic bag usage.

 

However, the council notes, with concern, that a 2015 study indicated that of the 270 million tons of new plastic made each year, 8 million tons ends up washed into the ocean.  Plastic which ends up in the River Cam and other watercourses locally contributes to this total, and can release toxic chemicals which harm the health of wildlife.It also notes the growing problem of microfibre pollution caused by the washing of synthetic textiles which has resulted in trillions of tiny threads of plastic being washed into our waterways.  These microfibres have been found in rivers, oceans, in our drinking water and in all forms of sea life, including birds, fish and plankton.

 

This Council believes that to stem the global tide of plastic pollution requires international commitment and regulation so we will write to both of our MPs and the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs asking them to act quickly to protect us and our planet by introducing legislation to prevent unnecessary damage to the environment from avoidable plastics and to reduce the amount of plastic waste. Including but not limited to;

 

·  Ban disposable coffee cups that can’t be recycled and introduce a 25p charge for disposable cups.

·  To prevent further microfibre pollution of our water and food chain by requiring the washing machine industry to develop filters which prevent microfibres washing into the water cycle, alongside legislation on the textile industry requiring the development of fabrics that shed less fibre in the first place.

·  To introduce a tax on packaging which uses only virgin plastics.

·  To ban disposable plastic glasses and introduce a nationwide deposit-and-return-scheme for plastic glasses such as we have at The Folk Festival.

·  To require all black plastic food trays and plant pots to be dyed using detectable black inks so that they can be fully recycled.

 

This council notes that organisations and individuals also need to take an active role in combating plastic pollution and we believe that we should lead by example which is why we have been looking at reducing our waste across the council. Some of the work that we have done so far includes;

·  As part of the Office Accommodation Strategy, we will be providing glasses and crockery in kitchens together with water dispensers so that staff do not have to use single-use plastic cups in the office. 

·  Encouraging all caterers working on City commissioned events to approach the event in as sustainable a way as possible. 

·  We have updated the Charter Market Regulations (CMR) this year and included the following new regulation: All Traders selling take away hot food or drinks must use cardboard or paper-based cups, trays, dishes or other biodegradable/ re-usable packaging for their products.

·  We are currently working on developing and launching a water bottle refill scheme in Cambridge.

·  We are Members of RECOUP (Recycling Of Used Plastics) a charity and not-for-profit member based organisation, which works in collaboration with all stakeholders to promote, develop, and increase the levels of plastics recycling within the UK.  We are meeting with a RECOUP representative in the coming week to help formulate a residents’ engagement and education campaign to increase the capture of plastics in our recycling bins.

 

This Council will continue our waste reduction work and bring a report to the Environment & Community Services Committee within the next year, which will look at the options for further reducing waste across the council and the city as a whole, making progress towards a Zero Waste strategy. This will include public information campaigns and working with local schools, businesses, organisations and the two universities.

 

18/39/CNLb

Councillor Cantrill - Cambridge Living Wage Motion

· Cambridge is a dynamic and successful city.  However, the cost of living is higher than almost anywhere else in the UK

 

· The Liberal Democrat administration introduced the Real Living Wage in the City Council in 2012/2013 and initiated the process for the council to be accredited with the Living Wage Foundation

 

· One of the key goals of the council introducing the real living wage was to act as an example to other employers across Cambridge and to encourage them to also pay the Real Living Wage

 

· In the last few years, the cost of living in Cambridge has continued to increase, particularly the cost of housing (both buying and renting), whilst wages have not kept pace for the majority of employees

 

· The council’s recent introduction of a minimum wage of £10 per hour helps council staff, but does not address the broader issue of many residents still struggling to make ends meet because of the cost of living

 

· This council therefore believes that building on the real living wage campaign the council has undertaken, the council should explore the introduction of a Cambridge Living Wage

 

· The Cambridge Living Wage would be a voluntary rate promoted by Cambridge City Council to reflect the higher costs of living in Cambridge.  The rate would be higher than the Real Living Wage (currently at £8.75 per hour) and be pegged to the London Living Wage (currently £10.20 per hour)

 

· The Cambridge Living Wage would be paid to all directly employed Council employees, contracted and subcontracted staff and the council would promote the wage to other employers in Cambridge

 

· The Council asks the Executive Councillor for Communities to bring forward:

o  proposals for how the Cambridge Living Wage would be introduced by the council, the rate that should be adopted and a basis for it, together with a timeline for its introduction

o  an action plan for promoting the Cambridge Living Wage to other employers within Cambridge building on the track record established by the Real Living Wage campaign

 

Minutes:

Councillor Cantrill proposed and Councillor Nethsingha seconded the following motion.

 

· Cambridge is a dynamic and successful city.  However, the cost of living is higher than almost anywhere else in the UK

 

· The Liberal Democrat administration introduced the Real Living Wage in the City Council in 2012/2013 and initiated the process for the council to be accredited with the Living Wage Foundation

 

· One of the key goals of the council introducing the real living wage was to act as an example to other employers across Cambridge and to encourage them to also pay the Real Living Wage

 

· In the last few years, the cost of living in Cambridge has continued to increase, particularly the cost of housing (both buying and renting), whilst wages have not kept pace for the majority of employees

 

· The council’s recent introduction of a minimum wage of £10 per hour helps council staff, but does not address the broader issue of many residents still struggling to make ends meet because of the cost of living

 

· This council therefore believes that building on the real living wage campaign the council has undertaken, the council should explore the introduction of a Cambridge Living Wage

 

· The Cambridge Living Wage would be a voluntary rate promoted by Cambridge City Council to reflect the higher costs of living in Cambridge.  The rate would be higher than the Real Living Wage (currently at £8.75 per hour) and be pegged to the London Living Wage (currently £10.20 per hour)

 

· The Cambridge Living Wage would be paid to all directly employed Council employees, contracted and subcontracted staff and the council would promote the wage to other employers in Cambridge

 

· The Council asks the Executive Councillor for Communities to bring forward:

o  proposals for how the Cambridge Living Wage would be introduced by the council, the rate that should be adopted and a basis for it, together with a timeline for its introduction

o  an action plan for promoting the Cambridge Living Wage to other employers within Cambridge building on the track record established by the Real Living Wage campaign

 

Councillor Johnson proposed and Councillor Bird seconded the following amendments to motion (additional text underlined and deleted text struck through)

 

Cambridge is a dynamic and successful city. However, the cost of living is higher than almost anywhere else in the UK

 

The Liberal Democrat administration introduced the Real Living Wage in the City Council in 2012/2013 and initiated the process for the council to be accredited with the Living Wage Foundation

 

In 2012 the then Labour opposition proposed the City Council pay the Real Living Wage rate to its employees, staff employed by its contractors and subcontractors, and to promote it widely amongst local businesses – a proposition which was enacted, and eventually led to the authority completing the Living Wage Foundation’s formal accreditation process in 2014

 

One of the key goals of the council introducing the Real Living Wage was to act as an example to other employers across Cambridge and to encourage them to also pay the Real Living Wage

 

Since 2014 the number of Cambridge businesses becoming accredited by the Living Wage Foundation as paying the Real Living Wage has increased from 16 to 59. The council has directly supported 26 of the 43 additional employers accredited since 2014

 

In the last few years, the cost of living in Cambridge has continued to increase, particularly the cost of housing (both buying and renting), whilst wages have not kept pace for the majority of employees

 

In acknowledging this fact, the council recently introduced a minimum wage rate of £10 per hour to its directly employed staff. The council will now seek the support of partner councils for this minimum payment rate to be extended to those employees who assist in delivering shared services for Cambridge residents

 

To further demonstrate its commitment to being an exemplar employer, the council should now also consider the possibility of extending its minimum wage rate to staff of contractors and subcontractors in the scope of the Real Living Wage

 

Furthermore, the council will continue its work in encouraging local businesses, and major employers like the colleges of the University of Cambridge, to pay their employees the Real Living Wage rate.

 

In promoting the Real Living Wage, the council believes this rate ought to be the absolute starting point when setting pay, and employers should consider going beyond this rate if it is possible for them to do so

 

The council’s recent introduction of a minimum wage of £10 per hour helps council staff, but does not address the broader issue of many residents still struggling to make ends meet because of the cost of living

 

This council therefore believes that, building on the real living wage campaign the council has undertaken, the council should explore the introduction of a Cambridge Living Wage

 

The Cambridge Living Wage would be a voluntary rate promoted by Cambridge City Council to reflect the higher costs of living in Cambridge.  The rate would be higher than the Real Living Wage (currently at £8.75 per hour) and be pegged to the London Living Wage (currently £10.20 per hour)

 

The Cambridge Living Wage would be paid to all directly employed Council employees, contracted and subcontracted staff and the council would promote the wage to other employers in Cambridge

 

The Council asks the Executive Councillor for Communities to bring forward:

• proposals for how the Cambridge Living Wage would be introduced by the council, the rate that should be adopted and a basis for it, together with a timeline for its introduction

• an action plan for promoting the Cambridge Living Wage to other employers within Cambridge building on the track record established by the Real Living Wage campaign

 

The council therefore resolves to:

-  ask officers to bring a report to Strategy and Resources Scrutiny Committee on the feasibility of the council extending its minimum payable wage rate to all its contracted and subcontracted staff

-  discuss with partner councils its aspiration for the minimum payable rate to be extended to those employees who deliver shared services for Cambridge residents

-  continue its work in encouraging local businesses to pay their employees a rate that properly takes into consideration the cost of living in Cambridge using, as its starting point, the Real Living Wage

 

On a show of hands the amendment was carried by 25 votes to 12.

 

Resolved (unanimously) that:

 

Cambridge is a dynamic and successful city. However, the cost of living is higher than almost anywhere else in the UK

 

In 2012 the then Labour opposition proposed the City Council pay the Real Living Wage rate to its employees, staff employed by its contractors and subcontractors, and to promote it widely amongst local businesses – a proposition which was enacted, and eventually led to the authority completing the Living Wage Foundation’s formal accreditation process in 2014.

 

One of the key goals of the council introducing the Real Living Wage was to act as an example to other employers across Cambridge and to encourage them to also pay the Real Living Wage

 

Since 2014 the number of Cambridge businesses becoming accredited by the Living Wage Foundation as paying the Real Living Wage has increased from 16 to 59. The council has directly supported 26 of the 43 additional employers accredited since 2014.

 

In the last few years, the cost of living in Cambridge has continued to increase, particularly the cost of housing (both buying and renting), whilst wages have not kept pace for the majority of employees

 

In acknowledging this fact, the council recently introduced a minimum wage rate of £10 per hour to its directly employed staff. The council will now seek the support of partner councils for this minimum payment rate to be extended to those employees who assist in delivering shared services for Cambridge residents.

 

To further demonstrate its commitment to being an exemplar employer, the council should now also consider the possibility of extending its minimum wage rate to staff of contractors and subcontractors in the scope of the Real Living Wage.

 

Furthermore, the council will continue its work in encouraging local businesses, and major employers like the colleges of the University of Cambridge, to pay their employees the Real Living Wage rate.

 

In promoting the Real Living Wage, the council believes this rate ought to be the absolute starting point when setting pay, and employers should consider going beyond this rate if it is possible for them to do so.

 

The council therefore resolves to:

-  ask officers to bring a report to Strategy and Resources Scrutiny Committee on the feasibility of the council extending its minimum payable wage rate to all its contracted and subcontracted staff

-  discuss with partner councils its aspiration for the minimum payable rate to be extended to those employees who deliver shared services for Cambridge residents

-  continue its work in encouraging local businesses to pay their employees a rate that properly takes into consideration the cost of living in Cambridge using, as its starting point, the Real Living Wage.