A Cambridge City Council website

Cambridge City Council

Council and democracy

Home > Council and Democracy > Agenda item

Agenda item

Councillor Robertson - Fireworks and Pets as Prizes

This Council notes:

 

Effects of Loud Fireworks on Animals

 

1.  Studies have found fireworks to be the most common cause for fear responses in dogs¹, and it is estimated that 45 percent of dogs show signs of fear when they hear fireworks². A New Zealand survey recorded 79 percent of horses as either anxious or
very anxious around fireworks or over the Guy Fawkes Day period.³

 

2.  Although there is limited direct evidence, it is also likely that fireworks and their debris will cause disturbance to wildlife, and are likely to cause suffering or distress, depending on the distance from the explosive and the noise level.

 

3.  The RSPCA believes that a licensing system would help with better enforcement of the law by allowing enforcement bodies to know where licensed events are being held so they can focus on locations and incidents elsewhere.

 

4.  This phobia can be treated (in dogs at least) in the long term but owners need to prepare themselves and their pets sooner, rather than just before the fireworks are let off. There is a need to raise awareness about the impact of fireworks on animals to the wider public to encourage them to be more considerate of those with pets, horses and livestock as well as local wildlife

¹ Blackwell, E., Bradshaw, J., & Casey, R. (2013). Fear responses to noises in domestic dogs: Prevalence, risk
factors and co-occurrence with other fear related behaviour. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 145, 15-25.
² Blackwell, E., Casey, R., & Bradshaw, J. (2005). Firework Fears and Phobias in the Domestic Dog. Scientific
Report for the RSPCA, University of Bristol, UK
³ Gronqvist, G, Rogers, C. & Gee, E. (2016). The Management of Horses during Fireworks in New Zealand.
Animals 6(20).

 

 

Pets as prizes

 

5.  That the RSPCA

a.  receives reports of pets given as prizes via fairgrounds, social media and other channels in England – and notes the issue  predominantly concerns goldfish

b.  is concerned for the welfare of those animals

c.  recognises that many cases of pets being as prizes may go unreported each year

d.  supports a move to ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

 

6.  That the city council has an existing policy that does not permit the use of live creatures as prizes at any event including circuses and funfairs on the Council’s parks and open spaces,


The Council agrees to:

 

A.  To encourage the organisers of all public firework displays within the local authority boundaries to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people

B.  To actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people – including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks.

C.  To write to the UK Government urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays.

D.  To encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display.

 

E.  To encourage others in Cambridge to also ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

F.  write to the UK Government, urging an outright ban on the giving of live animals as prizes on both public and private

 

 

Minutes:

Councillor Collis proposed and Councillor Dryden seconded the following motion:

 

 Effects of Loud Fireworks on Animals

1.  Studies have found fireworks to be the most common cause for fear responses in dogs¹, and it is estimated that 45 percent of dogs show signs of fear when they hear
fireworks². A New Zealand survey recorded 79 percent of horses as either anxious or very anxious around fireworks or over the Guy Fawkes Day period.³

2.  Although there is limited direct evidence, it is also likely that fireworks and their debris will cause disturbance to wildlife, and are likely to cause suffering or distress, depending on the distance from the explosive and the noise level.

3.  The RSPCA believes that a licensing system would help with better enforcement of the law by allowing enforcement bodies to know where licensed events are being held so they can focus on locations and incidents elsewhere.

4.  This phobia can be treated (in dogs at least) in the long term but owners need to prepare themselves and their pets sooner, rather than just before the fireworks are let off. There is a need to raise awareness about the impact of fireworks on animals to the wider public to encourage them to be more considerate of those with pets, horses and livestock as well as local wildlife

¹ Blackwell, E., Bradshaw, J., & Casey, R. (2013). Fear responses to noises in domestic dogs: Prevalence, risk
factors and co-occurrence with other fear related behaviour. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 145, 15-25.
² Blackwell, E., Casey, R., & Bradshaw, J. (2005). Firework Fears and Phobias in the Domestic Dog. Scientific
Report for the RSPCA, University of Bristol, UK
³ Gronqvist, G, Rogers, C. & Gee, E. (2016). The Management of Horses during Fireworks in New Zealand.
Animals 6(20).

 

Pets as prizes

5.  That the RSPCA

a.  receives reports of pets given as prizes via fairgrounds, social media and other channels in England – and notes the issue predominantly concerns goldfish

b.  is concerned for the welfare of those animals

c.  recognises that many cases of pets being as prizes may go unreported each year

d.  supports a move to ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

6.  That the city council has an existing policy that does not permit the use of live creatures as prizes at any event including circuses and funfairs on the Council’s parks and open spaces,

 

The Council agrees to:

A.  To encourage the organisers of all public firework displays within the local authority boundaries to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people

B.  To actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people – including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks.

C.  To write to the UK Government urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays.

D.  To encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display.

E.  To encourage others in Cambridge to also ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

F.  write to the UK Government, urging an outright ban on the giving of live animals as prizes on both public and private land.

 

Councillor Porrer proposed and Councillor Nethsingha seconded the following amendment to motion (additional text underlined):

 

This Council notes:

Effects of Loud Fireworks on Animals

1.  Studies have found fireworks to be the most common cause for fear responses in dogs¹, and it is estimated that 45 percent of dogs show signs of fear when they hear fireworks². A New Zealand survey recorded 79 percent of horses as either anxious or
very anxious around fireworks or over the Guy Fawkes Day period.³

2.  Although there is limited direct evidence, it is also likely that fireworks and their debris will cause disturbance to wildlife, and are likely to cause suffering or distress,depending on the distance from the explosive and the noise level.

3.  The RSPCA believes that a licensing system would help with better enforcement of the law by allowing enforcement bodies to know where licensed events are being held so they can focus on locations and incidents elsewhere.

4.  This phobia can be treated (in dogs at least) in the long term but owners need to prepare themselves and their pets sooner, rather than just before the fireworks are let off. There is a need to raise awareness about the impact of fireworks on animals to the wider public to encourage them to be more considerate of those with pets, horses and livestock as well as local wildlife

¹ Blackwell, E., Bradshaw, J., & Casey, R. (2013). Fear responses to noises in domestic dogs: Prevalence, risk
factors and co-occurrence with other fear related behaviour. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 145, 15-25.
² Blackwell, E., Casey, R., & Bradshaw, J. (2005). Firework Fears and Phobias in the Domestic Dog. Scientific
Report for the RSPCA, University of Bristol, UK
³ Gronqvist, G, Rogers, C. & Gee, E. (2016). The Management of Horses during Fireworks in New Zealand.
Animals 6(20).

 

Pets as prizes

5.  That the RSPCA

a.  receives reports of pets given as prizes via fairgrounds, social media and other channels in England – and notes the issue  predominantly concerns goldfish

b.  is concerned for the welfare of those animals

c.  recognises that many cases of pets being as prizes may go unreported each year

d.  supports a move to ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

 

6.  That the city council has an existing policy that does not permit the use of live creatures as prizes at any event including circuses and funfairs on the Council’s parks and open spaces,

 

The Council agrees to:

A.  To encourage the organisers of all public firework displays within the local authority boundaries to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people

B.  To actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people – including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks.

C.  To write to the UK Government urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays.

D.  To encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display.

E.  To investigate the use of fireworks and firework equivalents that reduce carbon release and reduce noise, and to work with Cambridge University and colleges and other stakeholders across the city to share this knowledge to reduce the carbon and acoustic impact of future events.

F.  To encourage others in Cambridge to also ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

G.  write to the UK Government, urging an outright ban on the giving of live animals as prizes on both public and private land.

 

On a show of hands the amendment was lost by 8 votes to 19.

 

Resolved (unanimously) that:

 

Effects of Loud Fireworks on Animals

7.  Studies have found fireworks to be the most common cause for fear responses in dogs¹, and it is estimated that 45 percent of dogs show signs of fear when they hear
fireworks². A New Zealand survey recorded 79 percent of horses as either anxious or very anxious around fireworks or over the Guy Fawkes Day period.³

8.  Although there is limited direct evidence, it is also likely that fireworks and their debris will cause disturbance to wildlife, and are likely to cause suffering or distress, depending on the distance from the explosive and the noise level.

9.  The RSPCA believes that a licensing system would help with better enforcement of the law by allowing enforcement bodies to know where licensed events are being held so they can focus on locations and incidents elsewhere.

10.  This phobia can be treated (in dogs at least) in the long term but owners need to prepare themselves and their pets sooner, rather than just before the fireworks are let off. There is a need to raise awareness about the impact of fireworks on animals to the wider public to encourage them to be more considerate of those with pets, horses and livestock as well as local wildlife

¹ Blackwell, E., Bradshaw, J., & Casey, R. (2013). Fear responses to noises in domestic dogs: Prevalence, risk
factors and co-occurrence with other fear related behaviour. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 145, 15-25.
² Blackwell, E., Casey, R., & Bradshaw, J. (2005). Firework Fears and Phobias in the Domestic Dog. Scientific
Report for the RSPCA, University of Bristol, UK
³ Gronqvist, G, Rogers, C. & Gee, E. (2016). The Management of Horses during Fireworks in New Zealand.
Animals 6(20).

 

Pets as prizes

11.  That the RSPCA

a.  receives reports of pets given as prizes via fairgrounds, social media and other channels in England – and notes the issue predominantly concerns goldfish

b.  is concerned for the welfare of those animals

c.  recognises that many cases of pets being as prizes may go unreported each year

d.  supports a move to ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

12.  That the city council has an existing policy that does not permit the use of live creatures as prizes at any event including circuses and funfairs on the Council’s parks and open spaces,

 

The Council agrees to:

A.  To encourage the organisers of all public firework displays within the local authority boundaries to be advertised in advance of the event, allowing residents to take precautions for their animals and vulnerable people

B.  To actively promote a public awareness campaign about the impact of fireworks on animal welfare and vulnerable people – including the precautions that can be taken to mitigate risks.

C.  To write to the UK Government urging them to introduce legislation to limit the maximum noise level of fireworks to 90dB for those sold to the public for private displays.

D.  To encourage local suppliers of fireworks to stock ‘quieter’ fireworks for public display.

E.  To encourage others in Cambridge to also ban the giving of live animals as prizes, in any form.

F.  write to the UK Government, urging an outright ban on the giving of live animals as prizes on both public and private land.